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Swedish losing country privilege...help! + other questions!

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  • Swedish losing country privilege...help! + other questions!

    I am just enquiring about a situation with my wife's friend that she just told me about. She is swedish, having been born in Sweden out of wedlock with a Canadian father and a Swedish mother. After birth, they moved back to Canada where they THEN became married. Basically, she lived in Canada for 15 years with no problems - even was issued a SIN # and was employed for a while.

    Family problems came about and they then left back to Sweden. Now 30, she has been trying to move permanently back in Canada but she has been denied citizenship, or landed status since she was born out of wedlock in the 70's when policy was apparently harsh on those issues!?!?

    Apparently, the policy may be reversed this fall, but she is currently here with a visitors visa and must return to Sweden in the summer. Is there any loopholes she could jump through to stay in Canada (besides marrying a Canadian)? She does have a 4 year teaching degree, but I understand Sweden to Canada policy is the same as Canada to US for teachers - there must be a shortage of teachers (which there isn't), and you must get job acceptance outside the country (where of course she is still inside the country).

    Any information would be greatly appreciated!

    Question 2! Our daughter was born in the US while we were living down there with a TN visa (we are both Canadian). Since she was born on US soil, will she ALWAYS have US citizenship (dual Canada), or will she be forced to give up one or the other when becoming an adult? Also, since US taxes worldwide income for US citizens, would she have to file taxes permenantly when she starts working, or are there special tax considerations when both parents are Canadian (or do you not even bother since you can't be double taxed and Canadian taxes are always going to be more than American)???

    Any suggestions or answers would be greatly appreciated!

    TIA
    Dave

  • #2
    I am just enquiring about a situation with my wife's friend that she just told me about. She is swedish, having been born in Sweden out of wedlock with a Canadian father and a Swedish mother. After birth, they moved back to Canada where they THEN became married. Basically, she lived in Canada for 15 years with no problems - even was issued a SIN # and was employed for a while.

    Family problems came about and they then left back to Sweden. Now 30, she has been trying to move permanently back in Canada but she has been denied citizenship, or landed status since she was born out of wedlock in the 70's when policy was apparently harsh on those issues!?!?

    Apparently, the policy may be reversed this fall, but she is currently here with a visitors visa and must return to Sweden in the summer. Is there any loopholes she could jump through to stay in Canada (besides marrying a Canadian)? She does have a 4 year teaching degree, but I understand Sweden to Canada policy is the same as Canada to US for teachers - there must be a shortage of teachers (which there isn't), and you must get job acceptance outside the country (where of course she is still inside the country).

    Any information would be greatly appreciated!

    Question 2! Our daughter was born in the US while we were living down there with a TN visa (we are both Canadian). Since she was born on US soil, will she ALWAYS have US citizenship (dual Canada), or will she be forced to give up one or the other when becoming an adult? Also, since US taxes worldwide income for US citizens, would she have to file taxes permenantly when she starts working, or are there special tax considerations when both parents are Canadian (or do you not even bother since you can't be double taxed and Canadian taxes are always going to be more than American)???

    Any suggestions or answers would be greatly appreciated!

    TIA
    Dave

    Comment


    • #3
      If mother of your wife's friend is Citizen, then you can sponsor her. Otherwise, she should consult some good Canadian Immigration Attorney and act accordingly.
      As for your daughter is concerned, she will have to decide when she will be 18 years old, whether she want US Citizenship or Canadian Citizenship. If she opts to retain U.S. Citizenship, then she must file Income Tax Returns every your.
      Good luck.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the bit about our daughter - seems a pain since she would never actually pay more taxes on the american side based on the Canadian tax rate! In regards to my wifes friend though, I understand that the policy about children born out of wedlock appears to be the issue here. Even though the father is Canadian, and the mother also 'eventually' became a Canadian citizen, the daughter gets left in the dark because of this Swedish 'policy'.....

        Make sense? I assume the mother can't sponsor!?

        Comment


        • #5
          What I understand no law of any country in the world, would stop any mother to sponsor and bring in her child even if the child is born out of wedlock. Still she is mother and the child is her biological child. Child born out of wedlock is very common in Western World. Your wife's friend should also seek services of some good Canadian Immigration Lawyer.
          Good luck.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the followup - just dug to understand the situation even more - I assume the main problem actually is the fact that her mother never returned back to Canada and has stayed in Sweden since they originally left. It's possible she may not even still have her Canadian citizenship although my wife isn't certain.

            That must be the main hang up I suppose, possibly just leaving her with a Canadian father.

            She does have grandparents (paternal) still in the country. Do they have the power to sponsor would you know?

            TIA
            Dave

            Comment


            • #7
              To dhadley :

              Your wife's friend should check with her mother about her Canadian Citizenship. If she has not reliquished her Canadian Citizenship then she can sponsor her daughter. Her grandparents can not sponsor her.
              Good luck.

              Comment

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