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What is my wife's legal name?

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  • ProudUSC
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by davdah:
    I have to disagree. Part of the vows are 'the two shall become one' There is a strong symbolic reference to that. It isn't just the women submitting herself. The man is assuming a responsibility for someone else. A balance of sorts that should be supported but in this day an age it isn't. A submissive women is labeled a slave and stupid. A guy taking care of his family is looked upon as being used and an idiot.

    This may seem trivial but it is one of many steps taken to destroy the family. Our parents didn't do that. Why not? And, if we notice, we have more parents still together than ourselves.

    Expectations and resolve have both been lowered. That's how it was done. Neither partner expects what our parents would have and neither hold to values with the same determination. Hence, it's easy to tear it apart. My 2nd X did the same thing, kept her name. The reasons for it became clear. If a women isn't comfortable and satisfied with the guys place in life, she shouldn't marry him. Same goes for the guy. If you start out divided it isn't going to go anywhere but further apart. Maybe we should look to the older ways for answers instead of some untested progressive agenda. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I think in some cases, the woman is the only one left in her family to carry on the name. That would be one reason to keep the maiden name. Another is the woman doesn't like the combination of her first and husband's last name. We have some young boater friends where this is the case. She didn't take his last name because the combination sounds a bit flakey and with her being an attorney, she opted to keep her maiden name. I don't think, at least in their case, that they aren't a team because she didn't take his name.

    In my case, I lucked out because my monogram stayed the same since my maiden and married name start with the same letter - lol!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • MakeItRight!
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Davidvcp:
    The name on her green card, SS card, and driver's license are not the same as the name on her birth certificate. So, what's her legal name. I'm preparing the N-400 form, and part 1, section A asks for her legal name. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Previous marriage??? Not necessarrily.
    Many Change Names to confuse the system. Intentional! Anyone can change their name Legal and Free!! Why Change it???? There Is purpose and Method Within many immigrants reasoning. Method!!!

    I had to recharge my portable power!!! .

    Leave a comment:


  • Kollerkrot
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by davdah:
    The one word spoken that sharpens my argument. Individualism! That single word is what causes the most problems. Two people married are a team, a partnership, a united front. The goal is for both.

    Being individual and separate is what drives people apart. Purposed and goals go in different directions and sooner or later they are fighting each other.

    Koller, your wrong to think a guy doesn't care about the name thing. Most still do. They may not say it but deep down they feel it, rejection. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Well, now I have to ask you, why would it be rejection? What is if a woman would feel she has to submissively drop her name. If a name signals and means unity so much, then let's unite the names.

    Perhaps a woman loves the guy, but I doesn't like the sound of his name. Why does she have have too....? Perhaps she comes from a well-known family with a famous name... there are so many reason - maybe it's a nationality issue.

    I kept mine and hyphenated it with my American husband's name. I think it is a great combination.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kollerkrot
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by davdah:
    An old fashioned idea that works. The women assumes it to be bound to him and the guy accepts the responsibility for her. There is no good reason to have separate names except to tell one's husband you don't want to be united. If your the guy going along with it you obviously want to dodge your proper position. Either way, it's doomed to failure or at minimum a distant relationship. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    The proper position! I am in agreement that it did work around my grandpa's time or even earlier. It could work if a woman has no drive for individualism and/or moreover has no education to stand on her own feet and wholly depends on a man to support her or chooses to be wholly dependent. I am sure there are still women like that.

    On the other hand, one has to be very careful to try to apply such values to younger more modern and individually thinking women. If applied by compulsive means like critizism or shame, I guess an individual thinking woman would retreat and would eventually seek divorce (so much for being bound). This is the trend we see en masse in today's society.

    Women carrying a man's name has nothing to do with the love or the attraction a couple has for one another. Personally, I am even in favor of seperate bedrooms.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brit4064
    replied
    Davdah is very old-fashioned LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • ProudUSC
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by davdah:
    You got it. Once a women is married, assuming she isn't a feminazi, and assumes her husband's last name, it becomes her legal name. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Davdah, didn't you know this is old fashioned? LOL. Many women choose to keep their maiden names nowadays for a variety of reasons. I took my husband's name and I think it's better when you have kids together that all last names are the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sprint_girl07
    replied
    Ah, sorry. Glad you managed to get them all in same name now.

    As far as I can see, you are good to file now

    Leave a comment:


  • Davidvcp
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Kollerkrot:
    Of course marriage changes a woman's legal name. Has done so for centuries.

    [snip]

    If you have no problem, you can always create one. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I have so little experience in these areas

    Thanks for the info

    Leave a comment:


  • Kollerkrot
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Davidvcp:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Sprint_girl07:
    David, as we said earlier in your other posts, I really think it is best to get all her documents in order, especially prior to filing. It can cause confusion later.

    She can change her name when she Naturalizes, but it is best to at least get SS and GC etc the same.

    Just my opinion. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    You are misunderstanding. At this point, her name for the SS agency and her GC are the same. Do you have experience filling out the N-400? That is what I need help on. I am unsure of her legal name. The name on her SS card, driver's license, and green card are the same. But that is different from the name on her birth certificate. I am unsure if marriage changed her 'legal' name. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Of course marriage changes a woman's legal name. Has done so for centuries. Women have something called "Maiden Name" which changes when they get married. The married name is then the "Legal Name". If her passport was issued before she got married, it naturally would list her maiden name unless she was married before.

    If you have no problem, you can always create one.

    Leave a comment:


  • Davidvcp
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Sprint_girl07:
    Her legal name is what USCIS has her as.

    USCIS info is what you go by, not passport.

    All your other documentation should be as what USCIS has her under. Not having all these documents in same name is going to cause problems and delays.

    A red flag might come up because it may seem that she is trying to have alias's.

    Since 9/11 they are being stricter.

    Best to get it all in order before filing. If she wants to go back to her maiden name, then she can do that when she Naturalizes. That is the only time she can do that. She had the opportunity when she got her Green card, she chose your married name on the form, so that is what they go by. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


    OK, if I understand correctly, the name on her green card is her legal name. That seems reasonable. As I mentioned, all her US documents now use her married name (SS card and driver's license -- are there others I need to know about?) The only documents that uses her maiden name are her Russian international passport and internal identification, which I don't think I need to worry about when dealing with USCIS.

    She does not want to go back to using her maiden name.

    Leave a comment:


  • federale86
    replied
    Put the one she has on her green card as her real name, provided she actually uses it as her legal name. Provide the other names she uses on the question that asks for other names she uses.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sprint_girl07
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by davdah:
    You got it. Once a women is married, assuming she isn't a feminazi, and assumes her husband's last name, it becomes her legal name. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Actually you are wrong Davdah. They go by what you write on the form. They put my Green Card in the name I wrote on the form and what was on my passport at the time. I had a chance to change it upon my Green Card issue, but I chose not to at first. But after finding out problems I went to USCIS office and gave them a letter asking them to change my name to married name. Then GC went into my married name.

    So confusing, hence best to get it dealt with prior to filing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sprint_girl07
    replied
    Her legal name is what USCIS has her as.

    USCIS info is what you go by, not passport.

    All your other documentation should be as what USCIS has her under. Not having all these documents in same name is going to cause problems and delays.

    A red flag might come up because it may seem that she is trying to have alias's.

    Since 9/11 they are being stricter.

    Best to get it all in order before filing. If she wants to go back to her maiden name, then she can do that when she Naturalizes. That is the only time she can do that. She had the opportunity when she got her Green card, she chose your married name on the form, so that is what they go by.

    Leave a comment:


  • Davidvcp
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by davdah:
    That may create a problem. Question is, how did the name get hosed to begin with? Unless you correct it on the green card to match the passport, assuming it is correct, you should stick with what documentation she has with USCIS. If she naturalizes she'll get a new blue passport and the russian won't matter anymore. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I'm not sure how or why USCIS decided to use her married name on the green card. I would have to guess it was because we submitted documents saying to do that, and they just did it.

    So, if the USCIS already knows her by her married name (on the green card) does that mean her married name is her legal name? If yes, then on the N-400 form, do I put her maiden name in Part 1.C (other names used)?

    Leave a comment:


  • Davidvcp
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Mrs. Mani:
    put the name that is on her green card, passport, etc. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    The name on her green card is different from the name that is on her Russian passport.

    Leave a comment:

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