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  • Mexican Interior Secretary: We'll Never Help U.S. Secure Border

    Mexican Interior Secretary: We'll Never Help U.S. Secure Border

    Well ya i think they have been lying to us,.
    Posted Jul 28, 2003

    Mexican Interior Secretary Santiago Creel, who has been agitating for the United States to grant amnesty to Mexican illegal aliens, said last week that his country will never help the United States secure its southern border.

    "We are not going to do that," Creel told reporter Jerry Kammer of the Copley News Service. Creel said the Mexican Constitution provides for "complete freedom of movement" for Mexicans inside Mexico, which, in Creel's view, precludes his government from stopping anybody on their side of the U.S. border. "We can't put up a checkpoint or a customs station inside our territory," said Creel.

    Kammer reported that prior to September 11, then-Mexican Foreign Secretary Jorge Castaneda had tried to work out a deal with the Bush Administration. If the administration would grant an amnesty to Mexican illegal aliens inside the United States, the Mexican government would work to make sure that the flow of illegal aliens stopped.

    According to Kammer, Castaneda's half-brother, former Deputy Foreign Minister Andres Rozental, unambiguously described the proposal as a "quid pro quo."

    "You both gave and took," said Rozental. "The 'take' was you received an orderly way for a large number of Mexicans to go to the United States, and in exchange [Mexico promised] to play its role in ensuring that the vast majority go that way."

    Former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Jeffrey Davidow viewed the U.S.-Mexican negotiations differently than Rozental. "That idea was never presented at the technical-level meetings," he said. "That was the greatest weakness in the whole negotiating scenario: The Mexican 'quid' was not going to be big enough for the U.S. 'quo.' What were they going to do, start a Border Patrol the same size as ours to keep Mexicans from crossing?"

    For his part, Rozental said that Creel was incorrect in arguing that it would be unconstitutional for the Mexican government to stop Mexicans from crossing illegally into the United States. "The Constitution says that Mexicans have freedom of movement," said Rozental, "but it also says [that movement is] subject to administrative regulations."

    Creel may be taking a swipe at the United States with the hope that it will improve his political prospects. He is seen as a candidate that the conservative National Action Party (PAN) is grooming to replace President Vicente Fox, when Fox's term expires in 2006.

    On July 10, as reported by the Los Angeles Times, Creel visited Washington, D.C., to address a meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and for private talks with Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge. Creel advised the bishops that the U.S. should essentially abandon any effort to stop Mexicans from crossing its Southern border.

    "There are nearly four million Mexicans working in the United States with no record of who they are, where they live, where they work and when they entered," said Creel. "Does it not make sense to improve security through allowing them to become fully recognized and legal? Migrant regularization would provide the United States with a greater margin of security than the one it currently has."

    "The policy of containment implemented by the United States on its southern border has not been able to stop the migration flow," he said. "The widespread surveillance has only changed the traditional routes taken by the migrants and increased the price they have to pay to get across."

    "The Mexican migratory flow represents no risk whatsoever, even less if it is documented," he said.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Copyright © 2003 HUMAN EVENTS. All Rights Reserved.

  • #2
    Mexican Interior Secretary: We'll Never Help U.S. Secure Border

    Well ya i think they have been lying to us,.
    Posted Jul 28, 2003

    Mexican Interior Secretary Santiago Creel, who has been agitating for the United States to grant amnesty to Mexican illegal aliens, said last week that his country will never help the United States secure its southern border.

    "We are not going to do that," Creel told reporter Jerry Kammer of the Copley News Service. Creel said the Mexican Constitution provides for "complete freedom of movement" for Mexicans inside Mexico, which, in Creel's view, precludes his government from stopping anybody on their side of the U.S. border. "We can't put up a checkpoint or a customs station inside our territory," said Creel.

    Kammer reported that prior to September 11, then-Mexican Foreign Secretary Jorge Castaneda had tried to work out a deal with the Bush Administration. If the administration would grant an amnesty to Mexican illegal aliens inside the United States, the Mexican government would work to make sure that the flow of illegal aliens stopped.

    According to Kammer, Castaneda's half-brother, former Deputy Foreign Minister Andres Rozental, unambiguously described the proposal as a "quid pro quo."

    "You both gave and took," said Rozental. "The 'take' was you received an orderly way for a large number of Mexicans to go to the United States, and in exchange [Mexico promised] to play its role in ensuring that the vast majority go that way."

    Former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Jeffrey Davidow viewed the U.S.-Mexican negotiations differently than Rozental. "That idea was never presented at the technical-level meetings," he said. "That was the greatest weakness in the whole negotiating scenario: The Mexican 'quid' was not going to be big enough for the U.S. 'quo.' What were they going to do, start a Border Patrol the same size as ours to keep Mexicans from crossing?"

    For his part, Rozental said that Creel was incorrect in arguing that it would be unconstitutional for the Mexican government to stop Mexicans from crossing illegally into the United States. "The Constitution says that Mexicans have freedom of movement," said Rozental, "but it also says [that movement is] subject to administrative regulations."

    Creel may be taking a swipe at the United States with the hope that it will improve his political prospects. He is seen as a candidate that the conservative National Action Party (PAN) is grooming to replace President Vicente Fox, when Fox's term expires in 2006.

    On July 10, as reported by the Los Angeles Times, Creel visited Washington, D.C., to address a meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and for private talks with Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge. Creel advised the bishops that the U.S. should essentially abandon any effort to stop Mexicans from crossing its Southern border.

    "There are nearly four million Mexicans working in the United States with no record of who they are, where they live, where they work and when they entered," said Creel. "Does it not make sense to improve security through allowing them to become fully recognized and legal? Migrant regularization would provide the United States with a greater margin of security than the one it currently has."

    "The policy of containment implemented by the United States on its southern border has not been able to stop the migration flow," he said. "The widespread surveillance has only changed the traditional routes taken by the migrants and increased the price they have to pay to get across."

    "The Mexican migratory flow represents no risk whatsoever, even less if it is documented," he said.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Copyright © 2003 HUMAN EVENTS. All Rights Reserved.

    Comment


    • #3
      The government of one country is not obligated to enforce the laws of another.

      Comment


      • #4
        .YOU HAVE INTERNATIONAIL LAW THAT ALL COUNTRIES USE POSTED FRIST, THEN YOU HAVE MEXICO LAW WHICH THEY DON'T ENFORCE EITHER, IT IS NOT A MATER OF LAWS ITS ENFORCEMNT OF THOSE WE HAVE; WERE WORKING ON IT, 2000 MORE BORDER patrol WERE HIRED



        Joint Communique
        Office of the Spokesman
        Washington, DC
        June 22, 2001
        [Spanish Version]

        U.S. –Mexico Migration Talks And Plan of Action for Cooperation on Border Safety

        Presidents Vicente Fox and George W. Bush, in the "Guanajuato Proposal" issued following their meeting in February, characterized migration as one of the major ties that bind Mexico and the United States. Accordingly, our respective policies should work to create a process of orderly migration that guarantees humane treatment of migrants, provides protection of their legal rights, ensures acceptable work conditions for migrants and also recognizes the right of nations to control the flow of people across their borders.
        For this purpose, the two Presidents directed the Secretary of State and the Attorney General of the United States, and the Secretaries of Foreign Relations and of the Interior of Mexico, to engage in formal high-level discussions to reach short and long-term agreements on migration and labor issues between Mexico and the United States. Both governments recognize that migration and its relationship with border safety are a shared responsibility.
        The initial meeting of the High Level Working Group on Migration occurred in Washington, DC on April 4. The two sides began talks aimed at achieving the goal of safe, legal, orderly and humane migration as set forth by our Presidents in Guanajuato. The binational agenda includes discussion of border safety, the H-2 temporary worker visa program, ideas on regularization of undocumented Mexicans in the United States, alternatives for possible new temporary worker programs, and efforts on regional economic development.
        The tragic deaths of fourteen Mexican migrants in the Arizona desert in May highlighted the pressing need for coordinated efforts to ensure safe and legal movement between Mexico and the U.S., and for considering and evaluating the potentials and consequences of expanded avenues for legal entries of Mexican nationals to the U.S.
        A binational working group met June 6 in San Antonio, Texas, to address border cooperation and safety. A second meeting took place on June 8 in Washington to continue our discussions of all migration-related issues on the binational agenda and to establish a timeframe for future action. As a result of these meetings, we agreed to increase immediately existing efforts to ensure safety on the border and to review our respective border policies in order to develop ways to accomplish our common goal of reducing risks and eliminating deaths of migrants along the border.
        These unprecedented cooperative efforts will be guided by a plan of action whose progress and implementation will be subject to regular review and evaluation. We have instructed our respective border authorities to implement immediately the following actions:
        Strengthen public safety campaigns to alert potential migrants of the dangers of crossing the border in high-risk areas;
        Reinforce operational plans for the protection, search and rescue of migrants along the border, including the increased aerial surveillance of desert areas on the U.S. side and increased presence of Grupo Beta elements on the Mexican side;
        Implement a cooperative, comprehensive and aggressive plan to combat and dismantle human smuggling and trafficking organizations; and
        Initiate a pilot-program on use of non-lethal weapons by Border Patrol agents.
        In order to coordinate special bilateral efforts to protect lives during the summer season, Mexican and U.S. officials held meetings in Tucson, Arizona, on June 14 and will hold additional meetings in the next several weeks in high-risk areas of California (San Diego and Calexico) and Texas (El Paso and Laredo).
        We are committed to making progress in preparing a comprehensive package of possible alternatives to address all migration-related issues on the binational agenda for consideration by our two Presidents when they meet in Washington in September.
        Plan of Action for Cooperation on Border Safety
        Both governments agree to coordinate their efforts toward addressing border safety concerns in order to reduce risks to migrants, law enforcement authorities and border communities. Such coordination is the only way effectively to achieve our common goal of enhancing public safety in the U.S.-Mexico border region.
        Both governments agreed that combating human smugglers, traffickers and criminal organizations should be given the utmost priority. Only cooperation in this regard can ensure the full success of this new comprehensive plan. To that end, Mexican and U.S. law enforcement agencies will be instructed to embark on an unprecedented joint effort to dismantle and penalize with all the weight of the law these criminal organizations.
        The Mexican Government commits to intensify immediately comprehensive actions in its territory designed to accomplish the following: reinforce border safety programs; consider actions to prevent access to crossing in high-risk areas; alert potential migrants of the dangers associated with non-authorized entries into the U.S; and underscore the serious consequences for migrants when they engage smugglers and criminals who only exploit their vulnerability.
        The U.S. Government commits to review immediately existing border control operations such as Gatekeeper, Hold the Line, Safeguard and Rio Grande, and to consider appropriate adjustments or alternatives to promote safety for migrants, law enforcement authorities and border communities and to prevent migrant deaths in the border region.
        In addition to the above-mentioned agreements, the Plan of Action for Cooperation on Border Safety includes the following:
        I. National and Binational Programs for Migrant Safety
        Develop a comprehensive set of binational programs and actions in areas of immediate concern to eliminate extreme risks to migrants. The deserts in Western Arizona, the All American Canal and the Rio Grande should be a priority in this regard.
        Strengthen public safety campaigns in Mexico to alert potential migrants of the imminent dangers of crossing the border through high-risk areas.
        Develop and implement specific operational plans for the search and rescue of migrants in dangerous areas along the border.
        Reinforce training programs on safety and migrant search and rescue operations.
        Map high-risk areas along the border to have an accurate portrait of new routes and implement preventive actions to reduce migrant risks.
        Activate additional cooperative binational actions on both sides of the border, like operations "Sky Watch II" -- a programs of aerial surveillance in the Arizona desert -- along with the reinforced presence of Beta Group elements in the Mexican side.
        Schedule periodic meetings, as needed, with Mexican and U.S. border consulates and law enforcement authorities to review regularly the results and the progress of local coordination efforts on border safety.
        II. Targeting Alien Trafficking
        Strengthen binational coordination among law enforcement agencies to fight human smugglers and traffickers on both sides of the border.
        Expedite and reinforce the exchange of bilateral information that targets migrant smugglers and traffickers.
        Review operations to that end (Denial, Crossroads, and Mexican operations).
        Embark on an unprecedented binational effort to combat and dismantle alien smuggling, trafficking and criminal organizations.
        Oversee and evaluate the outcomes of the implementation of such bilateral programs by holding periodic meetings.
        III. Border Violence
        Implement the U.S.-Mexico Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation against Border Violence (Mérida, February 15, 1999) and corresponding Guidelines (Washington, June 8, 2000) for cooperation between Mexican consuls and U.S. Attorneys in the border region. These memoranda facilitate the investigation of diverse violent incidents occurring at the border.
        Initiate a pilot program on use of non-lethal weapons by Border Patrol agents.
        Strengthen bilateral cooperation on preventive actions in order to:
        Reduce incidents of aggression against Border Patrol agents;
        Prevent assaults against migrants and border authorities;
        Deter migrant detentions by civilians.
        IV. Incursions
        Agree on an immediate plan of action that reduces incursions and incidents on both sides of the border
        Develop a binational program for demarcation at isolated areas to avoid incursions
        V. Cooperative Responses to Border Region Emergencies
        Agree on a Rapid Response Program that guarantees early alert and information exchanges between authorities of both governments for the immediate attention to critical border incidents.
        Such a program should aim to coordinate actions between central (Washington-Mexico City) and local authorities (Mexican consul-INS/BP) including measures to ensure that proper investigations are conducted.
        Develop cooperative mechanisms to respond to emergencies at the border, such as Emergency Management and Response Mechanisms:
        At border crossing points and international bridges in cases of bomb threats or trans-border pursuit of criminals.
        During weather related and natural disaster emergencies (wild fires, snow storms, rainstorms, heat waves,) for search and rescue coordination, publication of weather advisories, etc.
        Enhance coordination to attend to injured persons during emergencies:
        Consider installation of dedicated telephone alarm system tied to emergency services
        VI. Safe and Orderly Repatriations
        Review, via the Interior Consultative Mechanisms (ICM), the appropriate implementation of the six existing local Safe and Orderly Repatriation Arrangements, including:
        Coordination of removals from the U.S. interior to the border, and
        Prevention of the removal to Mexico of non-Mexican nationals.
        VII. Repatriation of Ex-Convicts
        Reinforce cooperation and coordination through the appropriate authorities for an orderly, legal and safe return of ex-convicts to Mexico.
        Meet, as needed, in order to review commitments and adjust existing programs.
        VIII. Border Liaison Mechanisms
        Enhance the role of the ten Border Liaison Mechanisms as bilateral coordinating entities at the local level.

        [End]
        Released on June 22, 2001

        For Mexico: Adherence to its own Migration Rules
        In general terms, the United states must press Mexico to begin enforcing some of its own elaborate laws on immigration and trans-border travel that have become virtual dead letters over the decades. Mexico should become as vigilant of its northern border as it is of its southern frontier. An appalling double standard now exists. Such urging will not be well received or easily acted upon. since the 1950s Mexican spokesmen have disingenuously claimed that the government cannot abridge the constitutional right of its citizens to leave their country.15 But Mexico's constitution and laws, as do U.S. laws, prescribe the conditions under which Mexicans must enter and leave the country "” conditions that are now ignored by millions.
        Migration of Mexican citizens is governed by the Ley General de Poblacion of 1974 (General Population Law), most recently amended in 1990. That law forbids surreptitious entry into neighboring nations. Article 11, Chapter 5 states:
        International transit of persons through ports, airports or borders may only be effected through the places designated for it and within the time periods established for it, and with the involvement of the migration authorities.
        Article 78, Chapter 4, of the General Population Law requires Mexicans intending to emigrate to meet the following conditions:
        Identify themselves and provide personal data to migration officials.
        Present proof that they meet all entry requirements under the laws of the country of their destination.
        Obtain for presentation to migration officials at the port of departure documentary proof that the intending emigrant is not a fugitive from justice or subject to a court order.
        If emigrating to work, be in possession of a work contract with adequate salary approved by the local labor board. Migration officials must have the conditions of employment in writing, approved by the Consul of the country of destination.
        Other provisions require the possession of Mexican passports for most categories of Mexicans traveling abroad. Certainly, a strong statutory basis exists if the Mexican government opts to control border flows with greater rigor.
        Transborder Cooperation in Enforcement
        The Mexican government in recent years has cooperated sporadically with American authorities on law enforcement concerns that affect immigration control. Consistent with past cooperation and in keeping with the closer relationship signaled by the Free Trade Agreement, the United States should seek continuing and consistent cooperation from Mexico in the following law enforcement concerns:
        Assistance in detecting and apprehending "Coyotes", smugglers of illegal aliens. who violate both nations' laws through greater sharing of information. coordinated police work and cooperation in prosecution. A sizable percentage of all illegal entries of Mexicans and other Western Hemisphere citizens is now smuggler-assisted, resulting in widespread exploitation of vulnerable travelers and serious corruption of law enforcement officials.
        A crack-down within Mexico on wholesale counterfeiting of U.S. identification and work authorization documents, and greater information sharing about document forgery rings in Mexico and Central America. Also needed is greater Mexican vigilance against forgery, fraud and imposture in the use of its own passports and other Mexican travel and identification documents.
        Aid from Mexican officials in discouraging reentry into the U.S. of Mexican citizens and third country nationals who have been deported from the U.S. Reentry into the United States after deportation is a felony offense. Yet reentry of criminal aliens, who have been deported after serving sentences in U.S. penal institutions, remains a serious law enforcement problem for state and federal authorities. For non-criminal Mexican aliens deported or given voluntary departure from Mexico, there should be greater Mexican commitment to directing them to jobs in Mexico, particularly as employment expands with free trade.
        Pre-clearance and Interior Repatriation. Mexico should resume its earlier practice of allowing the u.s. Immigration and Naturalization service (INS) to return apprehended illegal aliens to areas near their homes in the interior of Mexico. Mexico's permission is needed as well for INS "pre-clearance" of travelers at major ports of departure within Mexico.
        Tight curbs by Mexican officials on the transit of Central Americans and other third Country illegal aliens through Mexico. The record of Mexican cooperation against the traffic in Central Americans has improved under the Salinas administration. The U.S. has provided modest funds to Mexico to assist with the cost of deportation.16 Curbing Central American illegal immigration into Mexico will become increasingly important for Mexico itself. Central America's population and labor force growth is even more rapid than Mexico's and migrants from those countries will be increasingly attracted to the relatively higher paying jobs in Mexico created by the expansion of free trade with the United States.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hey Acelaw, I found the perfect website for you. You can go there and paste all the ant-immigrant, anti-Mexican articles you can find and people there will agree with you. People here don't care. You are not going to deter people from coming to the US by pasting giant articles onto this board. The website where I think you would fit in very well is:
          http://www.stormfront.org

          Comment

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