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INS arrests 14 criminal aliens in N. Carolina.

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  • INS arrests 14 criminal aliens in N. Carolina.

    Fourteen illegal immigrants convicted of crimes ranging from murder to
    robbery were arrested Wednesday in a sweep by the U.S. Immigration and
    Naturalization Service and several other law enforcement agencies.

    The roundup, dubbed "Operation Unexpected," targeted undocumented
    immigrants living in Mecklenburg, Gaston, Union and Cabarrus counties
    who
    had been convicted of felonies and in most cases served prison time.

    Currently, prisons notify the INS when an illegal immigrant convicted
    of a
    crime is about to be released from prison, so the immigrant can be
    deported. Immigrants who commit crimes without legal immigration status
    must serve their time and are then usually deported to their home
    country.

    But the INS didn't always work so closely with prisons, and some of the
    14
    arrested Wednesday were released years ago, before the INS was notified
    when illegal immigrants were being released, said Richard Gottlieb,
    officer
    in charge of the Charlotte INS office.

    The immigrants arrested Wednesday were from Canada, the Dominican
    Republic,
    El Salvador, Iran and Mexico. They had been convicted of felonies
    including
    murder, drug trafficking, robbery, indecent liberties with minors,
    theft,
    fraud and firearms offenses.

    All were taken to the Mecklenburg County jail and will either be
    deported
    or brought before an immigration judge, Gottlieb said.

    "Looking at the nature of their offenses, we have to say perhaps they
    are a
    greater risk to public safety than someone who ... hasn't committed a
    criminal offense," Gottlieb said.

  • #2
    Fourteen illegal immigrants convicted of crimes ranging from murder to
    robbery were arrested Wednesday in a sweep by the U.S. Immigration and
    Naturalization Service and several other law enforcement agencies.

    The roundup, dubbed "Operation Unexpected," targeted undocumented
    immigrants living in Mecklenburg, Gaston, Union and Cabarrus counties
    who
    had been convicted of felonies and in most cases served prison time.

    Currently, prisons notify the INS when an illegal immigrant convicted
    of a
    crime is about to be released from prison, so the immigrant can be
    deported. Immigrants who commit crimes without legal immigration status
    must serve their time and are then usually deported to their home
    country.

    But the INS didn't always work so closely with prisons, and some of the
    14
    arrested Wednesday were released years ago, before the INS was notified
    when illegal immigrants were being released, said Richard Gottlieb,
    officer
    in charge of the Charlotte INS office.

    The immigrants arrested Wednesday were from Canada, the Dominican
    Republic,
    El Salvador, Iran and Mexico. They had been convicted of felonies
    including
    murder, drug trafficking, robbery, indecent liberties with minors,
    theft,
    fraud and firearms offenses.

    All were taken to the Mecklenburg County jail and will either be
    deported
    or brought before an immigration judge, Gottlieb said.

    "Looking at the nature of their offenses, we have to say perhaps they
    are a
    greater risk to public safety than someone who ... hasn't committed a
    criminal offense," Gottlieb said.

    Comment


    • #3
      I thought INS begins deportation proceeding well ahead before the jail time is completed.

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't feel so bad if they go. These immigrants are the true cancer of soceity. They are the reasons why we have hard time with our immigration issues.

        Comment


        • #5
          That was the point, INS should have deported them before spending our government resources for keeping them in county jails.

          Comment


          • #6
            surprise, are you saying that those criminals should have not been sent in jail, but immediately deported to their countries? Wouldn't that make them inclined to come here again (after being deported they reenter the country illegally) and carelessly committ another crime, then go back to their country without spending too much time in jail here, and repeat the same thing over and over again?

            Comment


            • #7
              It may be so, but we cannot spend our taxpayers money to keep them in our jails.

              Comment


              • #8
                get the facts before u make any decision....these people may have lived in the US for many years and made a mistake.....

                Comment


                • #9
                  ...but their mistake was big enough to be called a crime...

                  Comment

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