Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Visa Type?

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Visa Type?

    Hello,

    I would like to know what type of visa do I have to apply for in case I will be accepted by Humans Rights Watch as an associate attorney after being awarded an LLM degree (from New York University School of LAw) my J.D. is from my native country. Work contract is secured via the university, but they did not give some clear-cut answer as to what visa I should seek (J-1, H1-B, F-1 etc.)

  • #2
    Hello,

    I would like to know what type of visa do I have to apply for in case I will be accepted by Humans Rights Watch as an associate attorney after being awarded an LLM degree (from New York University School of LAw) my J.D. is from my native country. Work contract is secured via the university, but they did not give some clear-cut answer as to what visa I should seek (J-1, H1-B, F-1 etc.)

    Comment


    • #3
      If you were in f-1, you can get an EAD pursuant to the F. Then later (when EAD expires) move to H-1B

      Comment


      • #4
        I have heard some people that they were granted am 1-year visa when they were first accepted for employment by Humans Rights Watch, then another 1-year visa for an additional year, yet it appears that after 3 years the contract with HRW may not be renewable. Hence I'm trying to figure out if there is a visa that allows one more control over the immigration status as opposed to 1-year temporary visas. H-1B is cool but I don't know if HRW would be willing to sponsor me for that.

        Comment


        • #5
          A friend of mine is working for HRW as a Furman Fellow and his best friend as a researcher for the Europe & Central Asia Division. Jay Furman is founder of the Furman Academic SScholarship at the New York University School of Law that you zuzu mention. NYU provided initially my friend with J-1 visa for the term of the Fellowship appointment, as part of our "Exchange Visitor Program" with the U.S. State Department; J-1s are expected to return to their own countries upon completion of their program of studies. The fellowship award may be renewed for another one or two additional years, depending upon the program of study. Hope that helps.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have heard that J-1 has a two-year requirement that the visa holder should spent outside the U.S. before they can apply for permanent residency. If you cannot obtain a waiver (and usually you cannot) you just do not have any other choice but to go back to your own country. If your intention is to stay permanently in the U.S. you may want to consider getting another job with an employer that is willing to sponsor you for an H-1B visa. Then you can move to Employment-Based Green Card, it's much easier if you are in H-1B temporary work status. Good Luck!

            Comment


            • #7
              No, I would say you do not have to quit your job with HRW once you come back into the US to work for them. At least stay some time with them (1-2 years) see what's up with other employers and then decide. It may seem easy to get an employer to sponsor you for an H-1B visa, but I assure you it's not. And even if you get an H-1B, it does not mean that that specific employer will sponsor you for permanent residency (green card) which is the ultimate goal of any one intending to stay forever in the U.S. Do not take too much for granted, since you can never predict in this world which is becoming even tougher for immigrants.

              Comment


              • #8
                magnolia, s/he cannot get from within the U.S. for another visa status (like H-1B status you are suggesting) if s/he, as a J-1 (if), is subject to the 2-year foreign residency requirement. So what you r u smoking here?

                Comment


                • #9
                  robespierre, I did not say that he doesn't have a J-1, if he does, well, he may not be able to change to another status without going back to his country; don't forget however that only scholars/researchers who are sponsored by the U.S. government or a foreign country government are subject to the mandatory 2-year residency requirement, not all J-1s.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The guy is much better off sticking around where he is, otherwise employers will jerk him around for a visa and he'll end up illegal in the end.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      pissy, a little bit of experimentation is always cool...don;t ya think heehee

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Wow, so disrespectful you people here...why r u so prejudiced against a foreigner who is really successful and wants to do things legally? It's no good...shame on you evil people!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          PTUH, no one is being disrespectful, so far as I understand...I guess all these people are trying to give an opinion as to what course of action is the best one for the guy...but as long as he does not give some more clarifications, people will make any kinds of suggestions...I do not feel someone is laughing at the guy.

                          Have A Good One!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            zuzu, it shouldn't be that difficult for you to locate employment that will enable you to be sponsored for a temporary work visa, and eventually green card. You are saying you have already been awarded an L.LM from the prestigious New York University School of Law (4th in the nation) - why should you be concerned about finding a really good position with a respectable company? Remember, America places a good deal of praise on intellectuals like yourself. If it were different, you wouldn't been offered employment at Humans Rights Watch as well. So, all in all, during the evenings after work dedicate a little bit of time to researching companies, getting leads, contacting the employers that best suit your vision, and then when you are ready go for it. Approach carefully the company, without being aggressive, but don't be submissive either. Americans like humble but brave people. I know, because I have been coached for at least a year or so by a supervisior of mine who is a sociologist specializing in immigrants transitions in the work environment. When I began work I felt really 'foreigner' but know, well, you can judge for yourself - am in the seventh sky and I feel that every one should be given the opportunity to prosper. Thank God millions times that we are in America - land of the free, zuzu.

                            Fab

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well, I don't wanna sound like I am underestimating the abilities of this young lawyer, but I wanted to say that three-quarters of immigrant visas are given to family-based applicants as opposed to one-quarter that goes to employment-based immigrants. So, while I do believe that the guy might be able to get a great job and eventually get sponsored for a visa/PR, he may well need to consider being married to an American woman.

                              Comment

                              Sorry, you are not authorized to view this page

                              Home Page

                              Immigration Daily

                              Archives

                              Processing times

                              Immigration forms

                              Discussion board

                              Resources

                              Blogs

                              Twitter feed

                              Immigrant Nation

                              Attorney2Attorney

                              CLE Workshops

                              Immigration books

                              Advertise on ILW

                              EB-5

                              移民日报

                              About ILW.COM

                              Connect to us

                              Questions/Comments

                              SUBSCRIBE

                              Immigration Daily



                              Working...
                              X