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Proof of economic status for tourist Visa

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  • Proof of economic status for tourist Visa

    Hello-

    Although the law only provides that one must show intent to return in order to qualify for a tourist visa, the reality is that the decision is based mostly on economic status. I want my mother-in-law to visit the U.S. for about 3 weeks this summer. However she is in Mexico, and I know that consulates in Latin American countries are notoriously difficult. Can anyone provide me examples of what was sufficient to get a visa approved, or examples of what has been denied?

    My MIL is close to 70, and she is the only adult responsible for her home and three grandchildren (ages 11,15, and 18) that are in her custody. She barely wants to make this trip, let alone stay in the U.S. for good. However the property is not in her name (it is in her grandson's name), and she does not have a job. I am hoping that if we help her buy the land next to her house in her name, and help her get some money into asvings that that will be good enough.

    I have one friend who is a middle3 age man who makes a very good living as a plumber, and lives in a million dollar home that he cares for, in addition to owning several of his own very nice homes, and he was deniedfor lack of documentation of a steady job.

    Can anybody share their experiences?

  • #2
    Hello-

    Although the law only provides that one must show intent to return in order to qualify for a tourist visa, the reality is that the decision is based mostly on economic status. I want my mother-in-law to visit the U.S. for about 3 weeks this summer. However she is in Mexico, and I know that consulates in Latin American countries are notoriously difficult. Can anyone provide me examples of what was sufficient to get a visa approved, or examples of what has been denied?

    My MIL is close to 70, and she is the only adult responsible for her home and three grandchildren (ages 11,15, and 18) that are in her custody. She barely wants to make this trip, let alone stay in the U.S. for good. However the property is not in her name (it is in her grandson's name), and she does not have a job. I am hoping that if we help her buy the land next to her house in her name, and help her get some money into asvings that that will be good enough.

    I have one friend who is a middle3 age man who makes a very good living as a plumber, and lives in a million dollar home that he cares for, in addition to owning several of his own very nice homes, and he was deniedfor lack of documentation of a steady job.

    Can anybody share their experiences?

    Comment


    • #3
      It is difficult. I'd advise her to get a local lawyer to build her case for her. They're pretty impressed if someone has enough cash and is serious enough to grab the servicese of a lawyer to put together their application and required doc's.

      -= nav =-

      Comment


      • #4
        The consulate told me the same thing. I am an attorney, but they said that *no one* can accompany the applicant in the interview. Although I am not that worried about the interview itself. Anybody who talks to this woman will be clear that there is no way she wants to remain in the U.S. Thank you for your advice. I will contact a lawyer in Mexico for theri advice.

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