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  • This is your chance to make yoursef, your family and others LEGAL.....

    On January 7, two very important bills are introduced, if these bills get majority vote, most among us will be legalized.
    Imagine, staying illegal, and being deported will not be end-of-world.

    If you want this to happen, this is your chance. Well! send emails, hand written letters to congressmen, and senators along with sufferings which current INS laws has caused you, your family or your friends.

    Few good congressmen has done their job, and now ball is in our court to show support for this.


    U.S. EMPLOYEE, FAMILY UNITY AND LEGALIZATION ACT

    ______


    HON. LUIS V. GUTIERREZ

    of illinois

    in the house of representatives

    Tuesday, January 7, 2003

    Mr. GUTIERREZ. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to announce the introduction
    of my bill, the ``U.S. Employee, Family Unity and Legalization Act'' or
    the ``U.S.E.F.U.L. Act.''
    I am very pleased to reintroduce legislation that reflects the global
    reality of our economy and the migratory nature of the labor market.
    Today, more than ever, immigrants play a critical role in our country's
    well-being and competently fill voids in our workforce and add strength
    and stability to our society.
    My bill will help many immigrants realize their potential and our
    Nation's promise. Tax payers, home and business owners, parents and
    grandparents, neighbors and friends will no longer be forced to hide in
    the shadows of a country with a broken immigration system.
    The USEFUL Act will enable immigrants now in the country to become
    eligible for permanent residency if they have lived in the U.S. for at
    least 5 years, regardless of their current immigration status. My bill
    calls for an immediate revision of the ``date of registry'', a
    provision in current immigration law that allows people to apply for
    permanent resident status if they had entered the United States by a
    specific date.
    Updating the registry date has been a sensible practice of our
    nation's immigration policy since 1929, yet Congress has allowed the
    registry date to remain set at January 1, 1972. As a result, the
    historic and fair recognition of valuable contributions of long-term,
    law-abiding, tax-paying residents of the United States has been
    undermined.
    The 1972 registry date has essentially become obsolete. My bill would
    immediately update the registry date to January 1, 1998, thus granting
    legal status to any immigrant who can establish that he or she was
    living in the United States by that time. The registry date would then
    roll forward by one year at a time every subsequent year until 2009.
    Thus, my bill would eventually grant permanent residency to every
    immigrant who entered the United States by January 1, 2003.
    Some people might say that this legislation is bold, ambitious, and
    faces an uphill battle. I agree.
    This bill is all of those things, but it is also legislation that is
    sound, sensible, and will ultimately be successful. My proposal will
    not only benefit deserving immigrants who have adopted the United
    States as their home, but all people who rely on safe communities and a
    sound and sustainable economy.
    Immigrants are vital to the health and strength of a number of
    economic sectors,

    [[Page E24]]

    such as the agricultural, service and construction industries.
    Immigrants are also vital to the smooth running of our daily lives--
    they educate our children, wash our dishes, mow our lawns, take care of
    our aging parents and grandparents, serve our food and clean our homes.

    If these workers are able enough, are responsible enough to care for
    our children, parents, and grandparents, should they not at least be
    afforded the benefits they have rightfully earned?
    A study highlighting the economic contributions of immigrants
    released just last month by the Center for Labor Market Studies at
    Northeastern University reported what many of us have understood for
    some time: Immigrant labor is absolutely essential to the health of the
    U.S. economy, both in terms of filling gaps in the labor market and
    expanding the nation's tax base.
    Despite the well-documented contributions of immigrants, some people
    still might say, in light of the attacks of September 11, that this is
    a bill whose time cannot come.
    I would strongly disagree. In fact, I would say that this bill is
    long overdue.
    We must not let our national security concerns cast a dark shadow
    over the importance and real contributions of immigrants to our
    country. We should not allow terrorists to destroy the hopes and quest
    for a better life that is inherent in each and every immigrant seeking
    a better life while making a considerable contribution to our
    workforce.
    Given the difficult lessons we learned from the tragedies of
    September 11th and our subsequent efforts to make this country safer
    for all of us, I would say we need this kind of bold immigration
    reform, like we have never needed it before. In fact, our national
    security demands it.
    We are all aware than an estimated 8 to 9 million undocumented
    immigrants live in this country. Imagine this community of people
    currently living in the shadows brought forward to live openly in our
    society as legal permanent residents.
    Imagine the relief it will provide to parents who, like the
    immigrants before them, came in search of a better life for their
    families.
    Imagine the relief of employers who depend on the work of these
    immigrants to keep their hotels, restaurants, factories, and businesses
    afloat.
    As a nation, we have committed immense resources to make our
    communities safer and to root out terrorists. Imagine our collective
    relief as Americans when we, alongside our immigrant friends who have
    come to build this Nation, are better able to focus our efforts on
    identifying and delivering justice to those that come to tear down this
    Nation.
    The United States has been and always will be a country of
    immigrants. I believe the USEFUL Act will go far toward easing the
    plight of long-term U.S. residents who, for all practical purposes are
    here to stay, but who under current immigration law remain vulnerable.
    Ultimately, we will all benefit from a stronger, more stable workforce.
    I also believe my bill will be extremely useful in our efforts to
    better secure the homeland and to protect us from future terrorist
    attacks.
    I urge my colleagues to help achieve needed immigration reform by
    supporting the USEFUL Act.

    _________________
    -----------------------------------------------------

    RESTORATION OF FAIRNESS IN IMMIGRATION ACT OF 2003

    ______


    HON. JOHN CONYERS, JR.

    of michigan

    in the house of representatives

    Tuesday, January 7, 2003

    Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I have introduced today the ``Restoration
    of Fairness in Immigration Act of 2003.''
    Since this nation's founding, more than 55 million immigrants from
    every continent have settled in the United States. Immigrants work hard
    to make ends meet and pay taxes every

    [[Page E33]]

    day. They have lived in this country for decades, married U.S.
    citizens, and raised their U.S.-citizen children. Laws that single
    these people out for no other reason than their status as immigrants
    violate their fundamental right to fair treatment.
    Yet, for too many years, Congress has witnessed a wave of anti-
    immigrant legislation, playing on our worst fears and prejudices. Since
    1994, we have considered proposals to ban birthright citizenship, ban
    bilingual ballots, and slash family and employment based immigration,
    as well as to limit the number of asylees and refugees. In 1996 we
    passed laws denying legal residents the right to public benefits and
    denying immigrants a range of due process and fairness protections.
    We continue to see the tragedy of September 11th used as an excuse
    for even more assaults on the rights of immigrants. The Justice
    Department is now registering certain classes of immigrants and
    arresting them when law abiding immigrants arrive to register. The
    Department is holding deportation hearings in secret and detaining
    immigrants even after they are ordered released. The Attorney General
    is reducing both the independence and number of judges that handle the
    appeals of immigration cases. We are fending off legislation almost
    daily intended to reduce if not eliminate immigration to this country.
    Those who urge us to restrict the due process rights of immigrants
    forget the reason these rights were established in the first place. We
    grant due process rights to citizens and non-citizens alike; not out of
    some soft-hearted sentimentality, but because we believe that these
    rights form an important cornerstone to maintaining civilized society.
    The ``Restoration of Fairness in Immigration Act of 2003'' furthers
    this proud legacy by restoring our nation's long standing compassion
    for individuals seeking to build a better life and reunite with their
    families.
    The bill restores fairness to the immigration process by making sure
    that each person has a chance to have their case heard by a fair and
    impartial decision maker. No one here is looking to give immigrants a
    free ride, just a fair chance.
    Justice and fairness, as well as our own economic interests, demand
    no less.


    ------------------------------------------------------------



    http://ilw.com/lawyers/immigdaily/co...GUTIERREZ.shtm
    http://ilw.com/lawyers/immigdaily/co...0-fairimm.shtm


    Please post this topic to other immigration portals and discussion groups, we need support from everyone, eachone of us.

  • #2
    On January 7, two very important bills are introduced, if these bills get majority vote, most among us will be legalized.
    Imagine, staying illegal, and being deported will not be end-of-world.

    If you want this to happen, this is your chance. Well! send emails, hand written letters to congressmen, and senators along with sufferings which current INS laws has caused you, your family or your friends.

    Few good congressmen has done their job, and now ball is in our court to show support for this.


    U.S. EMPLOYEE, FAMILY UNITY AND LEGALIZATION ACT

    ______


    HON. LUIS V. GUTIERREZ

    of illinois

    in the house of representatives

    Tuesday, January 7, 2003

    Mr. GUTIERREZ. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to announce the introduction
    of my bill, the ``U.S. Employee, Family Unity and Legalization Act'' or
    the ``U.S.E.F.U.L. Act.''
    I am very pleased to reintroduce legislation that reflects the global
    reality of our economy and the migratory nature of the labor market.
    Today, more than ever, immigrants play a critical role in our country's
    well-being and competently fill voids in our workforce and add strength
    and stability to our society.
    My bill will help many immigrants realize their potential and our
    Nation's promise. Tax payers, home and business owners, parents and
    grandparents, neighbors and friends will no longer be forced to hide in
    the shadows of a country with a broken immigration system.
    The USEFUL Act will enable immigrants now in the country to become
    eligible for permanent residency if they have lived in the U.S. for at
    least 5 years, regardless of their current immigration status. My bill
    calls for an immediate revision of the ``date of registry'', a
    provision in current immigration law that allows people to apply for
    permanent resident status if they had entered the United States by a
    specific date.
    Updating the registry date has been a sensible practice of our
    nation's immigration policy since 1929, yet Congress has allowed the
    registry date to remain set at January 1, 1972. As a result, the
    historic and fair recognition of valuable contributions of long-term,
    law-abiding, tax-paying residents of the United States has been
    undermined.
    The 1972 registry date has essentially become obsolete. My bill would
    immediately update the registry date to January 1, 1998, thus granting
    legal status to any immigrant who can establish that he or she was
    living in the United States by that time. The registry date would then
    roll forward by one year at a time every subsequent year until 2009.
    Thus, my bill would eventually grant permanent residency to every
    immigrant who entered the United States by January 1, 2003.
    Some people might say that this legislation is bold, ambitious, and
    faces an uphill battle. I agree.
    This bill is all of those things, but it is also legislation that is
    sound, sensible, and will ultimately be successful. My proposal will
    not only benefit deserving immigrants who have adopted the United
    States as their home, but all people who rely on safe communities and a
    sound and sustainable economy.
    Immigrants are vital to the health and strength of a number of
    economic sectors,

    [[Page E24]]

    such as the agricultural, service and construction industries.
    Immigrants are also vital to the smooth running of our daily lives--
    they educate our children, wash our dishes, mow our lawns, take care of
    our aging parents and grandparents, serve our food and clean our homes.

    If these workers are able enough, are responsible enough to care for
    our children, parents, and grandparents, should they not at least be
    afforded the benefits they have rightfully earned?
    A study highlighting the economic contributions of immigrants
    released just last month by the Center for Labor Market Studies at
    Northeastern University reported what many of us have understood for
    some time: Immigrant labor is absolutely essential to the health of the
    U.S. economy, both in terms of filling gaps in the labor market and
    expanding the nation's tax base.
    Despite the well-documented contributions of immigrants, some people
    still might say, in light of the attacks of September 11, that this is
    a bill whose time cannot come.
    I would strongly disagree. In fact, I would say that this bill is
    long overdue.
    We must not let our national security concerns cast a dark shadow
    over the importance and real contributions of immigrants to our
    country. We should not allow terrorists to destroy the hopes and quest
    for a better life that is inherent in each and every immigrant seeking
    a better life while making a considerable contribution to our
    workforce.
    Given the difficult lessons we learned from the tragedies of
    September 11th and our subsequent efforts to make this country safer
    for all of us, I would say we need this kind of bold immigration
    reform, like we have never needed it before. In fact, our national
    security demands it.
    We are all aware than an estimated 8 to 9 million undocumented
    immigrants live in this country. Imagine this community of people
    currently living in the shadows brought forward to live openly in our
    society as legal permanent residents.
    Imagine the relief it will provide to parents who, like the
    immigrants before them, came in search of a better life for their
    families.
    Imagine the relief of employers who depend on the work of these
    immigrants to keep their hotels, restaurants, factories, and businesses
    afloat.
    As a nation, we have committed immense resources to make our
    communities safer and to root out terrorists. Imagine our collective
    relief as Americans when we, alongside our immigrant friends who have
    come to build this Nation, are better able to focus our efforts on
    identifying and delivering justice to those that come to tear down this
    Nation.
    The United States has been and always will be a country of
    immigrants. I believe the USEFUL Act will go far toward easing the
    plight of long-term U.S. residents who, for all practical purposes are
    here to stay, but who under current immigration law remain vulnerable.
    Ultimately, we will all benefit from a stronger, more stable workforce.
    I also believe my bill will be extremely useful in our efforts to
    better secure the homeland and to protect us from future terrorist
    attacks.
    I urge my colleagues to help achieve needed immigration reform by
    supporting the USEFUL Act.

    _________________
    -----------------------------------------------------

    RESTORATION OF FAIRNESS IN IMMIGRATION ACT OF 2003

    ______


    HON. JOHN CONYERS, JR.

    of michigan

    in the house of representatives

    Tuesday, January 7, 2003

    Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, I have introduced today the ``Restoration
    of Fairness in Immigration Act of 2003.''
    Since this nation's founding, more than 55 million immigrants from
    every continent have settled in the United States. Immigrants work hard
    to make ends meet and pay taxes every

    [[Page E33]]

    day. They have lived in this country for decades, married U.S.
    citizens, and raised their U.S.-citizen children. Laws that single
    these people out for no other reason than their status as immigrants
    violate their fundamental right to fair treatment.
    Yet, for too many years, Congress has witnessed a wave of anti-
    immigrant legislation, playing on our worst fears and prejudices. Since
    1994, we have considered proposals to ban birthright citizenship, ban
    bilingual ballots, and slash family and employment based immigration,
    as well as to limit the number of asylees and refugees. In 1996 we
    passed laws denying legal residents the right to public benefits and
    denying immigrants a range of due process and fairness protections.
    We continue to see the tragedy of September 11th used as an excuse
    for even more assaults on the rights of immigrants. The Justice
    Department is now registering certain classes of immigrants and
    arresting them when law abiding immigrants arrive to register. The
    Department is holding deportation hearings in secret and detaining
    immigrants even after they are ordered released. The Attorney General
    is reducing both the independence and number of judges that handle the
    appeals of immigration cases. We are fending off legislation almost
    daily intended to reduce if not eliminate immigration to this country.
    Those who urge us to restrict the due process rights of immigrants
    forget the reason these rights were established in the first place. We
    grant due process rights to citizens and non-citizens alike; not out of
    some soft-hearted sentimentality, but because we believe that these
    rights form an important cornerstone to maintaining civilized society.
    The ``Restoration of Fairness in Immigration Act of 2003'' furthers
    this proud legacy by restoring our nation's long standing compassion
    for individuals seeking to build a better life and reunite with their
    families.
    The bill restores fairness to the immigration process by making sure
    that each person has a chance to have their case heard by a fair and
    impartial decision maker. No one here is looking to give immigrants a
    free ride, just a fair chance.
    Justice and fairness, as well as our own economic interests, demand
    no less.


    ------------------------------------------------------------



    http://ilw.com/lawyers/immigdaily/co...GUTIERREZ.shtm
    http://ilw.com/lawyers/immigdaily/co...0-fairimm.shtm


    Please post this topic to other immigration portals and discussion groups, we need support from everyone, eachone of us.

    Comment


    • #3
      I suggest to write to your congressman or senator

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you very much for taking this initiative.

        Comment


        • #5
          Count me in Dude.

          Comment


          • #6
            Me too

            Comment


            • #7
              I sure will write my Congressmen and ask them to OPPOSE these bills. The sad truth is that illegal aliens make up about 30% of this country's prisoners in our jails - and that's just the ones who are caught. The sad truth is that illegal aliens receive more in taxpayer services than they could contribute in a lifetime. The sad truth is that illegal aliens have BROKEN OUR IMMIGRATION LAWS and do not deserve to be rewarded. If, on the other hand, an alien has overstayed and can state a REASONABLE reason for doing so (other than his own choice to break the law) then that alien should be considered for a waiver.

              Comment


              • #8
                I am a citizen. I can and do vote. I will be letting my congress people know that I will only vote for people who opose this bill. 86% of the American people want illegals rounded up and deported. They are bankrupting many states. 1/3 of the people in jail in my state(CA.)are illegals. The new figures are out. They COST CA. over 7 billion dollars last year. Thats BILLION . This was after what little taxes they paid. It is a myth to think they will pay taxes if they give them amnesty. They all have way too many children to pay taxes. They make $6.75 an hour and have 6 kids. They will cost us a bundle. Even congress isn't THAT stupid. It's just some mexican congressmen trying to help HIS people. Well he better start remembering what country he is in.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Its not only Mexicans that are here illegal.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    To American guest,Although judging by your vernacular ,I doubt you really are.Do you not understand the meaning of the word illegal??It doesn't matter why these people came here,or how long they have been here .They are criminals. And even if they came here to make a better life,They are ruining the quality of Americans lives.They commit far more crime,are way less educated,and therefor will never have a job to make enough money to pay taxes,because they all have way too many children . It doesn't seem to matter to them that they can't afford them ,they have them anyway. Do you know how much each one costs the US Taxpayer??$65,ooo . over there lifetime. From the cost of their birth ,school medical care free lunch programs ,incarceration ect.They will never stop costing us. Why should we pay for all that??To get our lawns mowed, our vegetables picked.??It isn't worth it. And if they are such hard workers ,why don't they stay in Mexico and work hard to make something of their own country??I'll tell you why. Because they can't get all the free stuff there ,that's why. They don't care about this country. Who are you trying to kid. Ask them. They don't want to learn English,they send money to Mexico and mooch off us. They have groups calling for the overthrow of the USA,and say they want to take Texas, Arizona CA, and New Mexico and call it Aztland,or something. They are as bad as terrorists.They shot 562 people in the city of Los Angeles last year. They commit more rapes and have more drunk driving accidents(Uninsured)than any one else. Do't you understand. We do not want or need them. If we want some fruit picked we can bring in some guest workers. Pretty soon Ca. will do what Arizona is doing and put armed citizens on the border to stop them. Or a lot of Americans will refuse to pay our taxes until they are all deported.That will wake up the government.Because we are the people who VOTE and PAY TAXES.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      i think that the bill is taking the right dirction in solving the problem that we face in todays world. How better to win the hearts of millions by awarding them thier dreams, nothing safer than a loyal ctizen. On the other hand if it does not go through many more will leave this counrty and go home ( also taking their capital with them) check with the counslates and see how much influx of capital they are seeing comming form the USA. If you think that John doe can mow your grass instead of immigrants, think again!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        To guest, Were you paying attention to that last post at all???What fairy land are you living in ?? What capitol?? you mean all the money they send to Mexico??? It is the third largest economy mexico has. US DOLLARS, That's money going OUT not coming IN '' Understand yet????And all the latest figures coming out are showing once and for all that illegal immigration is C O S T I N G us BILLIONS of dollars every year.BILLIONS with a B .Get it. ??86% of Americans want the Army on the border stoping them from coming in. With guns. Does that tell you anything?? They want illegals deported. NOW''Got the picture yet?? They do NOTHING for this country except raise the crime rate, lower the test scores and bankrupt the sates they are living in. CAN you please show me where you think this is a good thing??????????????????????????

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I am American - 100%. I was born in Brooklyn. Some of my relatives are West Indian - therefore immigrants. I'm not sure, but some might be here and out of status and so desperately want the opportunity to be legal - so many loopholes though, and the waiting period is horrendous - 15-20 years for a brother to file for his sister or vice versa - minimum. Bet you didn't know that. Do you know the amount of things that take place in that time period? My mother, who is a naturalized USC filed for my aunt and her family in 1988, to this day she is still waiting. And guess what, my mother died in 1996 - what now?

                          Some of my relatives have even met and fell in love with USC - genuinely, yet the INS have their doubts. The pictures are there with the marriage, children are born. Before, if you marry a USC it take 6 months - tops to get GC, now it takes 6-7 years. You see, they are making it harder and harder for these people to survive - why? I don't know. That is why some of them just stay and hope that a amnesty will come.

                          Since you have sized me up, I'll offer the same to you. Judging from YOUR response you seem to be a red-neck. Someone who hate others that don't look like you. I don't care for people like you.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            American ,I truly feel sorry for your familys plight. I have nothing against LEGAL immigration. The laws are set up to allow a certain number of people in at a rate they can be absorbed into the country without causing anyone to much trouble. If you had really thought about it, the illegals are the cause of all the ins problems. They are overwhelmed. You get a bunch of blood ******* immigrant attorneys lying to these people and telling them it doesn't matter if they broke the law but for a few thousand dollars they can fix it. Well they can't. But meanwhile they tie up the system getting their illegal client his day in court,thus making the wait longer for the people who should be being taken care of. These illegals are a drain in every way on this country. We simply cannot let Everyone in.We will soon be the third world country they are trying to leave. Overrun with uneducated poverty stricken people. Not everyone is qualified to make it in this country. There was NOTHING here when the pilgrams came. They made this country. These immigrants should be pilgrams in their own countriesand make a better life there. If we continue to be populated with these illegals our own poverty rates will soar. We already have states going bankrupt. You will never rise above overty in this country unless you are educated. These people are uneducated when they get here. They don't learn the language so they can help their children learn. They are dropping out of school at alarming rates. So we have a whole generation of poverty coming up with very high birth rates which will expand the problem greatly. Is that what you want for this country???I love this country enough to stand up and fight when I see it being destroyed. That is what I am trying to do . Look beyond your family at the big picture.Please

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thank you.

                              Comment

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