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  • #46
    Catholic priests should be allowed to marry their male lovers.

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    • #47
      Yeah, I mean the Texas case. I know there is a move on the add a constitutional "defense of marriage" amendment, but I still don't think its likely to pass (if it even gets that far). Also, Bush was actually distancing himself from it earlier today. Just wanted to clarify that some of the posters to this thread who are hoping for the PPIA to pass have a little more reason to hope for it as of last week, in my opinion.

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      • #48
        Disagree on the Catholic priest thing, 'cause at the moment none of them are allowed to marry, and I would rather seem them let women become priests before they go and let them get hitched. THink it would be better for the church in the long run if that happened.

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        • #49
          You are definitely right :Whodat: taken into consideration also that at least 60% of priests are closeted homosexuals.

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          • #50
            You mean they have become priests so that they'll be a bit closer to God to hear their prayers to turn them straight? Or, in order for several of them to be in the same building (the church) to facilitate the carrying out of their homosexual activities, away from the attention of the world?

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            • #51
              For the record, I don't actually have a problem with Catholic priests being *** (or for that matter, with anyone being ***). Seems to me like its their business, not mine. And for the record, I myself am a practicing Catholic (I guess the appropriate term for me is a "cafeteria catholic," because I obviously do not tow the whole catholic line like I suppose I should; but I will answer to God for that in person one day, and somehow I don't see God being that angry at me for it).

              Thing is, the priesthood is supposed to include a vow of chastity, so sexual orientation is not supposed to enter it. I actually believe that a majority of priests more or less manage to keep this vow; thing is that we always hear about the minority that don't. My point is that I think the church's reasoning about women not being able to be priest (for some reason, the church believes that they are "incapable" of consecrating the holy host for communinion). Personally, I think that is pretty silly, so I would rather see them let women become priests first to deal with a priest shortage than allow priests to marry in some lame effort to make the priesthood more "heterosexual" (which is what that would be all about; they still would not recognize *** marriage because, hey, ***ness is against church doctrine . . . .)

              But hey, what does any of this have to do with immigration?

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              • #52
                "Catholic priests being ***"

                What do you mean, G a y ?

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                • #53
                  I don't think it would wite ***, maybe you wrote something else...

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                  • #54
                    Wow, it did...looks like *** is a bad word on these boards, lol

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                    • #55
                      G a y

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                      • #56
                        G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y
                        G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y
                        G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y
                        G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y
                        G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y
                        G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y
                        G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y
                        G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y
                        G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y
                        G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y G-A-Y

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                        • #57
                          **** **** ***** ***

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                          • #58
                            LOL G-A-Y!

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                            • #59
                              Unfortunately, I believe your odds are not good, at least based on this article in our local newspaper printed yesterday, June 29. Best of luck to you.


                              If he can't live and love here, he'll take his creativity abroad

                              Patrick Scully

                              Published June 29, 2003

                              In 1978 I flew across the Atlantic to be the best man in my friend Keith's wedding in Warsaw. Four years earlier he had met Bozena at a language camp and fallen in love. They decided to get married and make a life together. They were free to live in either her homeland, Poland, or Keith's, the United States. They came here, and have lived happily together. A sweet love story.

                              Keith was the first friend I came out to, back in 1972. Like Keith, I am a native of Minnesota. Like Keith, I fell in love overseas. In November of 2000 I met a man, Mauricio, in Rio de Janeiro. We fell in love. I have since been to Brazil to be with him eight times, for periods ranging from two weeks to three months. We traveled together in Italy for a month in 2001, and worked together on a performance project in Germany for a month last summer.

                              Unlike Keith, I have no right to get married. Unlike Keith, I have no right to be with my partner in my own country.

                              I have tried. A little over a year ago Mauricio applied for a tourist visa to come here. He was turned down. Like me, he is a *** artist, working in dance and theater, and scrambles to make a living. Our consulate looks for proof of his ties to his country. These are things like a wife and children, a full-time job, home ownership and a lot of money in the bank. He's a *** artist and has none of these (just like me). His application was refused.

                              We tried again this year. In mid-May Mauricio had an interview at the U.S. Consulate in Rio as part of his application for a student visa. He had been accepted to study English at the University of Minnesota. My brother had agreed to sponsor him. He had a letter explaining that as of Jan. 1, 2004, he would be a full-time member of a Rio-based dance company that tours internationally. He was going to study here from September through December.

                              Our consular officials asked him why a dancer needs to learn English, and suggested he learn it in Brazil.

                              Many people see Thursday's Supreme Court ruling as a watershed moment for *** rights, and perhaps it is. But imagine yourself in my situation, and you will see that it is not nearly enough.

                              If there were true equality in this country, I would be able to apply to bring Mauricio here as my life partner, as any heterosexual can.

                              As it now stands, I am forced to choose between living in this community, which I love, and being with the man I love. I want to live with the man I love here, but can't. This is sad and unfair.

                              I am going to Berlin to build a life with Mauricio.

                              I have contributed much to our community in my lifetime. Among my contributions:

                              "¢ Over 30 years of performing on stages ranging from the Walker and Guthrie to the Southern and Illusion theaters, to scores of schools across the state.

                              "¢ Creation of Patrick's Cabaret in Minneapolis.

                              "¢ Development of the Science Museum of Minnesota's outreach program, Museum on the Move.

                              "¢ Original development of the Museum Magnet School in the St. Paul schools.

                              At 49, I have not yet contributed half of what I have to give. In these challenging times, our country needs the experience and creativity of people like me. I would love to continue to make my contributions in the Twin Cities, and to live with my partner at the same time. Current U.S. immigration law makes this impossible.

                              My relationship counts for nothing in the eyes of the federal government. There are thousands of American citizens in similar horrible situations, all created by laws that treat ***s and *******s as second-class citizens.

                              I have a great job waiting for me in Germany. I look forward to accomplishing wonderful things there. Mauricio will be able to stay with me there, because he is my partner. If Germany were the United States, I would be refused entrance because I am HIV-positive. If Germany were the United States, I would be refused entrance because I can't provide proof of ties to my country (wife, kids, house, car, full-time job and a big bank account). Fortunately, Germany is not the United States. In Berlin I will have more right to love and live as a noncitizen than I have in my own country.

                              A bittersweet love story.

                              Patrick Scully is an artist and activist living in Minneapolis.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Each country has its own rules and laws, and they are not alike to each other, and if you don't like rules and laws of America then you are free to live in Germany or whichever country you prefer.

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