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  • #61
    well i found out y he got deported...

    he recieved a letter sayin that he can file for change of status from family unity program to permanent residency..so i guess they filed n later he got a letter saying that it was denied due to failing to disclose all chrges except one disorderly conduct..so his employment auth was terminated then i guess the argument w/ my mother n the arrest came into play...

    if i submit the waivers would it make a difference...i mean the charges were dismissed/ discharged...

    Comment


    • #62
      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by J@n1n@:
      well i found out y he got deported...

      he recieved a letter sayin that he can file for change of status from family unity program to permanent residency..so i guess they filed n later he got a letter saying that it was denied due to failing to disclose all chrges except one disorderly conduct..so his employment auth was terminated then i guess the argument w/ my mother n the arrest came into play...

      if i submit the waivers would it make a difference...i mean the charges were dismissed/ discharged... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

      Hi J1

      From your text, it appears that he in fact did have other charges that were not disclosed that uscis found out about. You do understand that this was not just about the last domestic charge that was brought against him.. right

      You need to find out what his criminal record is. In essence, they accused him of lying on his application . Who knows, maybe they were crimes that belonged to another person of the same name, maybe they were in fact his and he thought he could cover them up.

      As I told you before, You need to find extent of his crimes to know if waiver is even available to file for him.

      If he went to NTA notice to appear hearing, he very well may have been granted voluntary departure. This will be much better than him being deported. Still you need to find out what his criminal record is to know if he is inadmissable or not.

      You are doing a good job.. keep digging

      Comment


      • #63
        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:
        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by J@n1n@:
        well i found out y he got deported...

        he recieved a letter sayin that he can file for change of status from family unity program to permanent residency..so i guess they filed n later he got a letter saying that it was denied due to failing to disclose all chrges except one disorderly conduct..so his employment auth was terminated then i guess the argument w/ my mother n the arrest came into play...

        if i submit the waivers would it make a difference...i mean the charges were dismissed/ discharged... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

        Hi J1

        From your text, it appears that he in fact did have other charges that were not disclosed that uscis found out about. You do understand that this was not just about the last domestic charge that was brought against him.. right

        You need to find out what his criminal record is. In essence, they accused him of lying on his application . Who knows, maybe they were crimes that belonged to another person of the same name, maybe they were in fact his and he thought he could cover them up.

        As I told you before, You need to find extent of his crimes to know if waiver is even available to file for him.

        If he went to NTA notice to appear hearing, he very well may have been granted voluntary departure. This will be much better than him being deported. Still you need to find out what his criminal record is to know if he is inadmissable or not.

        You are doing a good job.. keep digging </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


        &gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;thank u ...n i meant to put he disclosed all charges except the disorderly conduct one...
        i did read some papers stating voluntary dept...n now i do realize the it was not just the recent arrest for domestic issue....hopefully something can be done...ill keep diggin...

        Comment


        • #64
          voluntary is good. This means you will not have to worry about 212 waiver for deportation.

          I am sorry to tell you that your father was a foolish man to blow opportunity like that over a domestic arugument. He had green card in hand almost and blew it.

          Hopefully, the prior criminal charges do not show a continual pattern. He knows what his problems are and hopefully he has done some rehabilitation that can be shown. Dig Dig Dig.


          You may be able to get this done on your own.. who knows

          Comment


          • #65
            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:
            voluntary is good. This means you will not have to worry about 212 waiver for deportation.

            I am sorry to tell you that your father was a foolish man to blow opportunity like that over a domestic arugument. He had green card in hand almost and blew it.

            Hopefully, the prior criminal charges do not show a continual pattern. He knows what his problems are and hopefully he has done some rehabilitation that can be shown. Dig Dig Dig.


            You may be able to get this done on your own.. who knows </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


            LOL I do agree my father was a foolish man..but who know maybe it happened for a reason his mother died so he got to see her after like forever....n yes i hope i can do this on my own to expensive for a lawyer..

            Comment


            • #66


              All things for a reason. That sure beats a green card any day. There is only one mom and he got to enjoy her one more time before she passed.

              Now you will take care of him and bring him back.


              Now we will look into your other problem.. dont mind me, I got confused between two posters. You dont have to worry about ice. lol

              Comment


              • #67
                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:


                All things for a reason. That sure beats a green card any day. There is only one mom and he got to enjoy her one more time before she passed.

                Now you will take care of him and bring him back.


                Now we will look into your other problem.. dont mind me, I got confused between two posters. You dont have to worry about ice. lol </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                &gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;o definitely it does beat a green card any day..lol but now im concerned if something happens to him over there lol i would like the green card at that point...those r my intentions taking care of him...

                lol n about my other problem i wasn sure if i should post it together but thanks for the heads up..

                Comment


                • #68
                  Naturalization Statistics

                  * Each year, USCIS welcomes approximately 680,000 citizens during naturalization ceremonies across the United States and around the world.

                  * In FY 2009, 74 percent of all persons naturalizing resided in 10 states (in descending order): California, New York, Florida, Texas, New Jersey, Illinois, Virginia, Massachusetts, Washington and Maryland.

                  * In FY 2009, the leading metropolitan areas of residence were New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA (15 percent), Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA (11 percent) and Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL (7.3 percent).

                  * In FY 2009, the top countries of origin for naturalization were in the following order: Mexico, India, Philippines, China and Vietnam.

                  * Since September 2001, USCIS has naturalized more than 62,763 members of the military, in ceremonies across the United States and in the following 20 countries: Afghanistan, Djibouti, China, Cuba, El Salvador, Germany, Greece, Haiti, Honduras, Iceland, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Kosovo, Kuwait, Philippines, South Korea, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

                  * Since 2008, USCIS has naturalized 809 military spouses during ceremonies in Bulgaria, China, Germany, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Oman, Panama, Philippines, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, Turkey and the United Kingdom.

                  Total Naturalized Citizens: Fiscal Years 2000-2009
                  <span class="ev_code_RED">2009</span> 743,715 <span class="ev_code_GREEN">2004</span> 537,151
                  <span class="ev_code_PURPLE">2008 </span> 1,046,539 <span class="ev_code_GREEN">2003</span> 463,204
                  <span class="ev_code_BLUE">2007</span> 660,477 <span class="ev_code_PINK">2002</span> 573,708
                  <span class="ev_code_BROWN">2006 </span> 702,589 <span class="ev_code_RED">2001</span> 608,205
                  <span class="ev_code_BLUE">2005 </span> 604,280 <span class="ev_code_PINK">2000</span> 888,788

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    ? does green card lottery mean u win a greencard...like when u play the real lottery but u win money not a green card..

                    o and i would also like to know wut ILW means...

                    i came up with this immigration laws n i dont know wut the w stands for...

                    Comment


                    • #70
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                      Comment


                      • #71
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