Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Visa/Waiver denied

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Visa/Waiver denied

    Hello
    I am a canadian citizen; my wife is an american citizen. We were married
    in canada in Sept 2002. My wife and I had discussed the difference in
    countries well before getting married. we decided that since she was born
    and raised in NC, and she has children there, that the best thing was for
    me to move to the US with her. We had looked into things with INS before
    we even got married, however, we were told wrong on several occassions. My
    wife came up to canada at the end of August 2002 and we were married Sept
    14, 2002. It was at that time that we began to submit documents. Prior
    to us getting married, we were told by INS and the American Consulate that
    it would take 3 to 4 months before I could move to NC. We accepted that
    and continued with our plans. My wife made plans to be away from NC for
    up to 4 months. After we were married and began our document "mess", we
    found out that immigrating could take up to 6 months. Then another time
    we called, we were told 9 months. After receiving the receipt for the
    I-130, we sent off the I-129F. It was returned 5 weeks later, saying we
    sent it to the wrong place (even though the document and the website said
    where to send it). We were told to send it to Texas, so we did, it was
    then again returned and we were told to send it to Chicago, so we did.
    Again, it was returned and we were told to send it to vermont. At this
    point, they notified us that we had sent it to the wrong place and they
    were forwarding it to the proper place (we never did find out where it was
    sent). Remember, between each time we got the documents back, 5 or more
    weeks had gone by. Finally, the I-12F was being processed,, however...
    because of my youth, in 1978 and 1979, I was convicted of possessing
    marijuana (here in Canada) under 30 grams. I have a canadian pardon for
    it. This was something we knew we had to do and the process for it began
    even prior to us getting married. We were told that I needed to apply for
    a non-immigrant waiver, and they sent me the package for it. They knew at
    the time that we were applying for an Immigrant waiver (I-601). After 5
    months of processing the non-immigrant waiver, they notified me that it
    was being pulled from processing because i needed to do a 601 waiver.
    (infact, it sat on their desk for nearly 4 months, it did not even get to
    the FBI check). It took us 2 months to get the documents back from them
    so that I could apply for the 601. In the mean time, I was told to travel
    to halifax (5 hrs away in a different province) to see the immigration
    doctor ($135), and to get x-rays and blood work ($150). I went to halifax
    and had it done. When I returned, I sent in my application for the K3
    visa along with my checklist into the US Consulate in Montreal. Keep in
    mind, that I had contacted the Consulate at least 10 times and told them
    my history/story. Finally, I got the appointment with the Consulate. I
    hopped on a bus and travelled 12 hrs to Montreal. The timeline from when
    I first applied for the I-130 and the meeting with the consulate was from
    September 2002 to June 18, 2003. In march 2003, my wife was forced to go
    back to NC, she has a son there that needed her. I went to the meeting
    at the consulate, waited for 2 hrs for "my turn" and paid my $100
    application fee. When I went in for my interview (5 minutes), I was told
    that my visa was being rejected because I had 2 convictions of possession
    of marijuana in 1978 and 1979. The law states that they can forgive 1
    conviction, but thats all. They told me to save my $195 for my waiver
    because I stood a 100% chance of having it denied. I asked them why they
    could not have told me that before I made the trip (on the telephone).
    There was no reply. So, I waited for 10hrs for a bus back to New
    Brunswick Canada and travelled 14 hrs back. My wife and I were totally
    devistated about this. Since that time, my wife has contacted all of her
    locals (Senators, Congressman, governor). She has also written numerous
    emails/letters to president Bush. She spent over $200 on postage to send
    out letters/articles to the house members. When we were married, the local
    paper (in canada) did a write up about our wedding/marriage. When we
    began to see the delays, they did a follow up and the local TV station
    interviewed us on TV. My wife in North Carolina, contacted the papers
    there, and 2 newspapers did articles on it. Infact one of the papers did
    2 articles. CBC radio, here in Saint John New Brunswick Canada
    interviewed us on their morning show. I was in the studio and Debbie was
    on the Phone in NC. We have spoken to many many people, and some say that
    I can get a presidential pardon, some say I can't. Some say that I need
    to have my criminal record wiped out completely, some say its not
    necessary. But one thing that everyone seems to agree on, is the
    unfairness of the Law that prevents me from entering the US. I am not
    allowed to visit my wife, infact I cannot cross the US Border. Since 1979,
    I have kept my nose clean, Ive not had any trouble in the last 24 years.
    Ive documented very clearly that my life since then has been very
    positive. I have been a Computer instructor for the past 10 years, where
    I have trained CEO's, Government officials, Clergy, corporate employees,
    Military personnel and many many others; Ive worked for the department of
    justice...... and nobody has ever had reason to question my honesty or
    integrity. I was laid off my job in Feb 2003, because my employer could
    not count on me being around long enough to teach my classes. He was
    expecting that I would be gone by the end of Dec 2002. My wife had left
    her job with the state to come up here to get married; and now is having
    alot of difficulty in finding a full time job in NC. I have my bills to
    pay here, and she has bills there. It is impossible for me to send money
    to her. We are now financially strapped, neither of us has 2 pennies to
    rub together. I think the Immigration law needs to be ammended to include
    a subparagraph that allows the Consulate officials to look at the life one
    is living to decide wheather or not they pose a threat to US security or
    the US drug problem. I pose no threat, and the Lady at the Immigration
    office agreed. However, she could do nothing because I had 2 convictions
    after the age of 17; 24 years ago. I currently have a petition on the web
    where I am trying to gather signatures of those who are apposed to the
    situation. (www30.brinkster.com/insproblems/) If anyone can suggest a way
    for me to immigrate to the US, or even visit my wife (Ive never met her
    children/friends/family); I would sure appreciate it.

    Thank you so much
    Terry VanDuzee
    terryv@nbnet.nb.ca or Terryvanduzee@hotmail.com

  • #2
    Hello
    I am a canadian citizen; my wife is an american citizen. We were married
    in canada in Sept 2002. My wife and I had discussed the difference in
    countries well before getting married. we decided that since she was born
    and raised in NC, and she has children there, that the best thing was for
    me to move to the US with her. We had looked into things with INS before
    we even got married, however, we were told wrong on several occassions. My
    wife came up to canada at the end of August 2002 and we were married Sept
    14, 2002. It was at that time that we began to submit documents. Prior
    to us getting married, we were told by INS and the American Consulate that
    it would take 3 to 4 months before I could move to NC. We accepted that
    and continued with our plans. My wife made plans to be away from NC for
    up to 4 months. After we were married and began our document "mess", we
    found out that immigrating could take up to 6 months. Then another time
    we called, we were told 9 months. After receiving the receipt for the
    I-130, we sent off the I-129F. It was returned 5 weeks later, saying we
    sent it to the wrong place (even though the document and the website said
    where to send it). We were told to send it to Texas, so we did, it was
    then again returned and we were told to send it to Chicago, so we did.
    Again, it was returned and we were told to send it to vermont. At this
    point, they notified us that we had sent it to the wrong place and they
    were forwarding it to the proper place (we never did find out where it was
    sent). Remember, between each time we got the documents back, 5 or more
    weeks had gone by. Finally, the I-12F was being processed,, however...
    because of my youth, in 1978 and 1979, I was convicted of possessing
    marijuana (here in Canada) under 30 grams. I have a canadian pardon for
    it. This was something we knew we had to do and the process for it began
    even prior to us getting married. We were told that I needed to apply for
    a non-immigrant waiver, and they sent me the package for it. They knew at
    the time that we were applying for an Immigrant waiver (I-601). After 5
    months of processing the non-immigrant waiver, they notified me that it
    was being pulled from processing because i needed to do a 601 waiver.
    (infact, it sat on their desk for nearly 4 months, it did not even get to
    the FBI check). It took us 2 months to get the documents back from them
    so that I could apply for the 601. In the mean time, I was told to travel
    to halifax (5 hrs away in a different province) to see the immigration
    doctor ($135), and to get x-rays and blood work ($150). I went to halifax
    and had it done. When I returned, I sent in my application for the K3
    visa along with my checklist into the US Consulate in Montreal. Keep in
    mind, that I had contacted the Consulate at least 10 times and told them
    my history/story. Finally, I got the appointment with the Consulate. I
    hopped on a bus and travelled 12 hrs to Montreal. The timeline from when
    I first applied for the I-130 and the meeting with the consulate was from
    September 2002 to June 18, 2003. In march 2003, my wife was forced to go
    back to NC, she has a son there that needed her. I went to the meeting
    at the consulate, waited for 2 hrs for "my turn" and paid my $100
    application fee. When I went in for my interview (5 minutes), I was told
    that my visa was being rejected because I had 2 convictions of possession
    of marijuana in 1978 and 1979. The law states that they can forgive 1
    conviction, but thats all. They told me to save my $195 for my waiver
    because I stood a 100% chance of having it denied. I asked them why they
    could not have told me that before I made the trip (on the telephone).
    There was no reply. So, I waited for 10hrs for a bus back to New
    Brunswick Canada and travelled 14 hrs back. My wife and I were totally
    devistated about this. Since that time, my wife has contacted all of her
    locals (Senators, Congressman, governor). She has also written numerous
    emails/letters to president Bush. She spent over $200 on postage to send
    out letters/articles to the house members. When we were married, the local
    paper (in canada) did a write up about our wedding/marriage. When we
    began to see the delays, they did a follow up and the local TV station
    interviewed us on TV. My wife in North Carolina, contacted the papers
    there, and 2 newspapers did articles on it. Infact one of the papers did
    2 articles. CBC radio, here in Saint John New Brunswick Canada
    interviewed us on their morning show. I was in the studio and Debbie was
    on the Phone in NC. We have spoken to many many people, and some say that
    I can get a presidential pardon, some say I can't. Some say that I need
    to have my criminal record wiped out completely, some say its not
    necessary. But one thing that everyone seems to agree on, is the
    unfairness of the Law that prevents me from entering the US. I am not
    allowed to visit my wife, infact I cannot cross the US Border. Since 1979,
    I have kept my nose clean, Ive not had any trouble in the last 24 years.
    Ive documented very clearly that my life since then has been very
    positive. I have been a Computer instructor for the past 10 years, where
    I have trained CEO's, Government officials, Clergy, corporate employees,
    Military personnel and many many others; Ive worked for the department of
    justice...... and nobody has ever had reason to question my honesty or
    integrity. I was laid off my job in Feb 2003, because my employer could
    not count on me being around long enough to teach my classes. He was
    expecting that I would be gone by the end of Dec 2002. My wife had left
    her job with the state to come up here to get married; and now is having
    alot of difficulty in finding a full time job in NC. I have my bills to
    pay here, and she has bills there. It is impossible for me to send money
    to her. We are now financially strapped, neither of us has 2 pennies to
    rub together. I think the Immigration law needs to be ammended to include
    a subparagraph that allows the Consulate officials to look at the life one
    is living to decide wheather or not they pose a threat to US security or
    the US drug problem. I pose no threat, and the Lady at the Immigration
    office agreed. However, she could do nothing because I had 2 convictions
    after the age of 17; 24 years ago. I currently have a petition on the web
    where I am trying to gather signatures of those who are apposed to the
    situation. (www30.brinkster.com/insproblems/) If anyone can suggest a way
    for me to immigrate to the US, or even visit my wife (Ive never met her
    children/friends/family); I would sure appreciate it.

    Thank you so much
    Terry VanDuzee
    terryv@nbnet.nb.ca or Terryvanduzee@hotmail.com

    Comment


    • #3
      I sympathize with your plight, but why on earth didn't you or your wife contact an attorney for help when you started to have problems? While people can "do it themselves" in many cases, with two convictions, you shouldn't have attempted it.

      I'm sorry for all that you went through, and hope that you will be able to make it to the US; however, you didn't bother to find out the rules before you went forward on this matter, and now you are complaining that under the rules, you are not eligible to immigrate. Many of our immigration rules are idiotic, but the same rules apply to everyone. Your complaint boils down to: I'm a good person and this isn't fair. Well, neither life nor US law is fair.

      Comment


      • #4
        We did not consult a lawyer because we could not afford one. All lawyers that we did ask about, said we were looking at minimum $3000 US Dollars (at the time that was approx $6000 Canadian dollars).
        We did check out the rules, we contacted the Consulate and told them that I had 2 convictions, but they did not tell us it would be a problem, so we proceded with what we were doing. Infact we contacted INS and the Consulate before we even got married, and nobody told us there would be a problem.

        Comment

        Sorry, you are not authorized to view this page

        Home Page

        Immigration Daily

        Archives

        Processing times

        Immigration forms

        Discussion board

        Resources

        Blogs

        Twitter feed

        Immigrant Nation

        Attorney2Attorney

        CLE Workshops

        Immigration books

        Advertise on ILW

        EB-5

        移民日报

        About ILW.COM

        Connect to us

        Questions/Comments

        SUBSCRIBE

        Immigration Daily



        Working...
        X