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    Security tight at Canada-Michigan border
    But Canadian truckers say morning wait only marginally longer


    DAVID RUNK
    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    DETROIT "” Security at Michigan's border crossings with Canada remained tight today following the U.S. strike on Iraq, with delays reported for some travelers and truckers coming into the United States.

    Truckers, who are used to increased questioning and security in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, shrugged off the waits as part of the job. They say the heavy flow of commerce between the countries, not war, is responsible for most backups.

    "They are doing their jobs, as usual," Paul Davieux, 54, of Quebec, said of the border officials at the Ambassador Bridge. "Maybe they are asking more questions, but there really is nothing different."

    Davieux said it took him about 30 minutes to cross the border into the United States with his load of auto parts. That wait is typical, but he noted that the delay the night before, when the United States launched its attack, grew to about two hours.

    Michigan has three other major border crossings: the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, the Blue Water Bridge in Port Huron and the International Bridge at Sault Ste. Marie.

    Slight waits were seen heading into Canada at the bridge and the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, which both connect Detroit with Ontario. Most of the waits today were seen for people waiting to cross into the United States.

    Border officials have been inspecting more vehicles and cargo and taking a closer look at passports and other documents since the government on Monday raised the terror alert from yellow, or elevated, to orange, or high, said Greg Palmore, a spokesman for the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Security.

    "We're still at orange alert, and we will remain that way until we're told to back down," Palmore said.

    Although the country is at war, Americans should feel secure at home because the border officials are doing everything they can to ensure the safety of our nation, he said.

    "These are well-seasoned, trained professionals that we have along our borders," Palmore said. "They know what they have to do to keep America safe.''

    The Ambassador Bridge over the Detroit River is the busiest crossing between the United States and Canada, with about 7,000 commercial trucks using it daily.

    Drivers at the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel saw lighter than usual delays of up to 15 minutes, operations superintendent Bryon Squire said this morning.

    "I think it's kinda scared everybody away," Squire said of the U.S. attack Wednesday night. "The traffic rate now is extremely light."

    Traffic was facing short waits at the Blue Water Bridge, the bridge authority said, and officials there were being a little more cautious in the wake of last night's attacks.

    There were no backups at the International Bridge this morning, said Phil Becker, general manager of that bridge's authority.

    "Traffic appears to be moving smoothly at this time," Becker said.

    At the Ambassador Bridge, it took Randy Holloway, 40, of Tillsonburg, Ontario, about 15 minutes to cross "” compared with a typical wait of 45 minutes.

    "It hasn't slowed down that much," said Holloway, whose truck was carrying a load of plastic pellets.

  • #2
    Security tight at Canada-Michigan border
    But Canadian truckers say morning wait only marginally longer


    DAVID RUNK
    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    DETROIT "” Security at Michigan's border crossings with Canada remained tight today following the U.S. strike on Iraq, with delays reported for some travelers and truckers coming into the United States.

    Truckers, who are used to increased questioning and security in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, shrugged off the waits as part of the job. They say the heavy flow of commerce between the countries, not war, is responsible for most backups.

    "They are doing their jobs, as usual," Paul Davieux, 54, of Quebec, said of the border officials at the Ambassador Bridge. "Maybe they are asking more questions, but there really is nothing different."

    Davieux said it took him about 30 minutes to cross the border into the United States with his load of auto parts. That wait is typical, but he noted that the delay the night before, when the United States launched its attack, grew to about two hours.

    Michigan has three other major border crossings: the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, the Blue Water Bridge in Port Huron and the International Bridge at Sault Ste. Marie.

    Slight waits were seen heading into Canada at the bridge and the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel, which both connect Detroit with Ontario. Most of the waits today were seen for people waiting to cross into the United States.

    Border officials have been inspecting more vehicles and cargo and taking a closer look at passports and other documents since the government on Monday raised the terror alert from yellow, or elevated, to orange, or high, said Greg Palmore, a spokesman for the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Security.

    "We're still at orange alert, and we will remain that way until we're told to back down," Palmore said.

    Although the country is at war, Americans should feel secure at home because the border officials are doing everything they can to ensure the safety of our nation, he said.

    "These are well-seasoned, trained professionals that we have along our borders," Palmore said. "They know what they have to do to keep America safe.''

    The Ambassador Bridge over the Detroit River is the busiest crossing between the United States and Canada, with about 7,000 commercial trucks using it daily.

    Drivers at the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel saw lighter than usual delays of up to 15 minutes, operations superintendent Bryon Squire said this morning.

    "I think it's kinda scared everybody away," Squire said of the U.S. attack Wednesday night. "The traffic rate now is extremely light."

    Traffic was facing short waits at the Blue Water Bridge, the bridge authority said, and officials there were being a little more cautious in the wake of last night's attacks.

    There were no backups at the International Bridge this morning, said Phil Becker, general manager of that bridge's authority.

    "Traffic appears to be moving smoothly at this time," Becker said.

    At the Ambassador Bridge, it took Randy Holloway, 40, of Tillsonburg, Ontario, about 15 minutes to cross "” compared with a typical wait of 45 minutes.

    "It hasn't slowed down that much," said Holloway, whose truck was carrying a load of plastic pellets.

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