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Medical Myths: Endometriosis facts vs. fiction

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  • Medical Myths: Endometriosis facts vs. fiction

    In our Medical Myths series, we approach medical misinformation head on. Using expert insight and peer reviewed research to wrestle fact from fiction, MNT brings clarity to the myth riddled world of health journalism. Endometriosis is a chronicTrusted Source condition in which tissue similar to that usually lining the inside of the uterus grows outside the womb. This condition can cause pain during periods, sexual intercourse, and urination or bowel movements. It can also be responsible for other symptoms, including nausea, fatigue, and mental health concerns.

  • #2
    Worldwide, approximately 10%Trusted Source of females of reproductive age have endometriosis. Although extremely rare, endometriosis in males can occurTrusted Source. Furthermore, because endometriosis symptoms are so varied, people with the condition often experience a delay in diagnosis.

    Risk factors for endometriosis includeTrusted Source having a mother, sibling, or daughter with the condition, having periods that began before age 11, or having periods that are heavy or last longer than 7 days. Having a history of short monthly cycles of fewer than 27 days can also increase the risk of endometriosis in some individuals.


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    • #3
      Originally posted by alexanderdebrahan View Post
      Worldwide, approximately 10%Trusted Source of females of reproductive age have endometriosis. Although extremely rare, endometriosis in males can occurTrusted Source. Furthermore, because endometriosis symptoms are so varied, people with the condition often experience a delay in diagnosis.

      Risk factors for endometriosis includeTrusted Source having a mother, sibling, or daughter with the condition, having periods that began before age 11, or having periods that are heavy or last longer than 7 days. Having a history of short monthly cycles of fewer than 27 days can also increase the risk of endometriosis in some individuals.

      Confirming an endometriosis diagnosis often involves laparoscopic surgery, a common surgical procedure done under anesthesia. Once a doctor confirms a diagnosis, treatments include managing the symptoms with hormone therapy or pain relief medication. If the pain associated with endometriosis is severe or if fertility has become affected, surgery is an option. However, there is currently no known cure for the condition.

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      • #4
        “I have had patients with [severe] endometriosis that become pregnant and those with mild endometriosis that do have issues. The only way to know if you will have problems with getting pregnant is to try. Just make sure you work with your [healthcare professional], since many of the medications used to treat endometriosis prevent pregnancy and will need to be stopped for you to be successful.”

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        • #5
          Originally posted by donaldrsimoner View Post
          “I have had patients with [severe] endometriosis that become pregnant and those with mild endometriosis that do have issues. The only way to know if you will have problems with getting pregnant is to try. Just make sure you work with your [healthcare professional], since many of the medications used to treat endometriosis prevent pregnancy and will need to be stopped for you to be successful.”
          Absolutely not. There is no association between abortion and endometriosis.

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          • #6
            There are three main typesTrusted Source of stroke. The first and most common, accounting for 87% of cases, is an ischemic stroke. It occurs when blood flow through the artery that supplies oxygen to the brain becomes blocked. The second is a hemorrhagic stroke, caused by a rupture in an artery in the brain, which in turn damages surrounding tissues.

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            • #7
              While stroke is very common, it is often misunderstood. To help us dispel myths on the topic and improve our understanding, we got in touch with Dr. Rafael Alexander Ortiz, chief of Neuro-Endovascular Surgery and Interventional Neuro-Radiology at Lenox Hill Hospital.



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              • #8
                Dr. Bhattacharya explained to Medical News Today that IBS “is a disorder of the interaction between the gut and brain, leading to diarrhea, constipation, or both, along with bloating and pain. [It] can be worsened or precipitated by stress and anxiety.”

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