Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

John Baer | Odd issue for a TV ad from SantorumOPERATION Save Santorum launched over

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • John Baer | Odd issue for a TV ad from SantorumOPERATION Save Santorum launched over

    OPERATION Save Santorum launched over the weekend with its first TV ad, something called "Candles," a 30-second spot about immigration.

    Hope you've seen it.

    Campaign-ad makers (all of whom suffer serious mental disorders from years of dealing emotionally and financially with political candidates) like to title spots with names only they and their analysts understand.

    I figure "Candles" is either a light in the darkness of a campaign looking for a bright spot, or a birthday wish for the candidate (he turned 48 last month) hoping things turn around soon.

    In any case, the ad strikes me as strange.

    Immigration? What are we, Texas? California? Arizona?

    No. We're a white (86 percent), aging (20 percent age 60 and older) Northeastern state concerned about taxes, jobs and health care.

    Still, here we go:

    "My father immigrated here from Italy with my grandfather, who worked 30 years in the coal mines of western Pennsylvania. They came here with dreams of a better life for their family.

    "Unfortunately, today some enter our country with more sinister intentions. That's why I fought so hard to add thousands of new guards to beef up our borders and for critical high-tech surveillance.

    "To do anything less is not only dangerous, but an insult to those who have come to America by following the rules."

    Strange, no? Part family-fuzzy, part sound the siren.

    It's Rick in a red, collared shirt sitting in what looks like his living room (one wonders which house) with what looks like members of his large (six kids) family in soft focus behind him engaged in what looks like a quiet round of family values. (Or lighting candles.)

    Rick looks earnestly into the camera with furrowed-brow concern to talk about how "some" entering America with "sinister intentions" can be "dangerous."

    A security spot? Like stuff the White House did to save its bacon in '04?

    You get the message: I'm a red-state kinda guy (check out the shirt) here to protect you and your family (see the family behind me?) and I don't like furriners.

    The shirt could be a red alert, borrowing the federal color code to signal a "severe" risk of "sinister intentions."

    Or could be the ad's red meat for right-wingers who rail against even legal immigrants.

    But there's also Italy, coal mines, western Pennsylvania and the American dream.

    So maybe it's one of those multilayer ads.

    It doesn't hurt, for example, to bring up working-class western-Pennsylvania roots, given that whole big-house-in-Virginia thing.

    And Pennsylvania's not a bad place to pitch Italy, coal, the American dream, families, security and ethnic fears.

    Italians are one of the state's largest ancestry groups, accounting for about 12 percent of the population. We're the fourth state in the nation in coal production. Everybody has dreams and families and wants security. And we're 40th among states in multiracial makeup.

    But I really don't get how immigration is an issue here. Are we worried West Virginians are coming to take our jobs?

    A Santorum aide shows me a recent Strategic Vision poll saying that when Pennsylvanians are asked if they favor amnesty for illegal immigrants, 83 percent say "no."

    OK. That's when they're asked. But when Pennsylvanians are polled about their concerns, immigration doesn't show up.

    A Penn State poll shows taxes, jobs and dissatisfaction with government and politics as top concerns; a Pew poll shows taxes, jobs, education and health care.

    I'm not entirely sure what Santorum's up to with his first TV ad of his toughest campaign. But I'm pretty sure a U.S. Senate seat in Pennsylvania won't be decided on someone's stand and/or policy on the issue of immigration.

  • #2
    OPERATION Save Santorum launched over the weekend with its first TV ad, something called "Candles," a 30-second spot about immigration.

    Hope you've seen it.

    Campaign-ad makers (all of whom suffer serious mental disorders from years of dealing emotionally and financially with political candidates) like to title spots with names only they and their analysts understand.

    I figure "Candles" is either a light in the darkness of a campaign looking for a bright spot, or a birthday wish for the candidate (he turned 48 last month) hoping things turn around soon.

    In any case, the ad strikes me as strange.

    Immigration? What are we, Texas? California? Arizona?

    No. We're a white (86 percent), aging (20 percent age 60 and older) Northeastern state concerned about taxes, jobs and health care.

    Still, here we go:

    "My father immigrated here from Italy with my grandfather, who worked 30 years in the coal mines of western Pennsylvania. They came here with dreams of a better life for their family.

    "Unfortunately, today some enter our country with more sinister intentions. That's why I fought so hard to add thousands of new guards to beef up our borders and for critical high-tech surveillance.

    "To do anything less is not only dangerous, but an insult to those who have come to America by following the rules."

    Strange, no? Part family-fuzzy, part sound the siren.

    It's Rick in a red, collared shirt sitting in what looks like his living room (one wonders which house) with what looks like members of his large (six kids) family in soft focus behind him engaged in what looks like a quiet round of family values. (Or lighting candles.)

    Rick looks earnestly into the camera with furrowed-brow concern to talk about how "some" entering America with "sinister intentions" can be "dangerous."

    A security spot? Like stuff the White House did to save its bacon in '04?

    You get the message: I'm a red-state kinda guy (check out the shirt) here to protect you and your family (see the family behind me?) and I don't like furriners.

    The shirt could be a red alert, borrowing the federal color code to signal a "severe" risk of "sinister intentions."

    Or could be the ad's red meat for right-wingers who rail against even legal immigrants.

    But there's also Italy, coal mines, western Pennsylvania and the American dream.

    So maybe it's one of those multilayer ads.

    It doesn't hurt, for example, to bring up working-class western-Pennsylvania roots, given that whole big-house-in-Virginia thing.

    And Pennsylvania's not a bad place to pitch Italy, coal, the American dream, families, security and ethnic fears.

    Italians are one of the state's largest ancestry groups, accounting for about 12 percent of the population. We're the fourth state in the nation in coal production. Everybody has dreams and families and wants security. And we're 40th among states in multiracial makeup.

    But I really don't get how immigration is an issue here. Are we worried West Virginians are coming to take our jobs?

    A Santorum aide shows me a recent Strategic Vision poll saying that when Pennsylvanians are asked if they favor amnesty for illegal immigrants, 83 percent say "no."

    OK. That's when they're asked. But when Pennsylvanians are polled about their concerns, immigration doesn't show up.

    A Penn State poll shows taxes, jobs and dissatisfaction with government and politics as top concerns; a Pew poll shows taxes, jobs, education and health care.

    I'm not entirely sure what Santorum's up to with his first TV ad of his toughest campaign. But I'm pretty sure a U.S. Senate seat in Pennsylvania won't be decided on someone's stand and/or policy on the issue of immigration.

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree 100% with this article....i predict that this immigration thing will only work in states close to the borders and the mistake that santorum is making is thinking PA voters will vote for him based on immigration when the state doesnt have this kind of problem and they prefer santorum to talk about tax, education and other stuff instead of immigration..

      GOOD TO SEE SANTORUM BEHIND BY MORE THEN 20 POINTS...HE NEEDS TO UNDERSTAND THAT HIS IMMIGRATION STANCE WONT DO ANYTHING FOR HIM AND THE BIGGEST MISTAKE HE'S MAKING IS NOT TALKING ABOUT WHAT ARE HIS PLANS FOR EDUCATION, TAXES, GAS AND OTHERS.

      Comment

      Sorry, you are not authorized to view this page

      Home Page

      Immigration Daily

      Archives

      Processing times

      Immigration forms

      Discussion board

      Resources

      Blogs

      Twitter feed

      Immigrant Nation

      Attorney2Attorney

      CLE Workshops

      Immigration books

      Advertise on ILW

      EB-5

      移民日报

      About ILW.COM

      Connect to us

      Questions/Comments

      SUBSCRIBE

      Immigration Daily



      Working...
      X