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  • CSS & Newman/LULAC

    Can someone please recommend a lawyer who is familiar with CSS & Newman/LULAC settlement agreements.
    My Application was denied so I need to use a lawyer at this stage.

    Steve

  • #2
    My application is on intent to denial my lawyer already sent the same documents to Immigration we are waiting for an answer. How long they took to denied your case from the moment you sent the reply for the intent to denial to the actual denial? My lawyer is in Phoenix AZ.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by schicco:
      Can someone please recommend a lawyer who is familiar with CSS & Newman/LULAC settlement agreements.
      My Application was denied so I need to use a lawyer at this stage.

      Steve
      You can give a call to www.shusterman.com, I know he's handling some CSS/Lulac denial cases.

      He's the one that handled my CSS case; I'm now a Temporary Resident.

      Freedom1.

      Comment


      • #4
        can you please tell me how much Mr. shusterman charge for Css/Lulac case.
        Thank you

        Comment


        • #5
          There is a list of attorneys on this site that you can pick from. Go to www.centerforhumanrights.org If I remember correctly, look on the left side and there should be a place where it says list of attorneys and you can click on that.

          These are attorneys that have been trained to take CSS /LULAC cases---but my suggestions, before you use any of them, it is your own duty to research, do your due dilligence and ask a lot of questions.

          Comment


          • #6
            Sorry folks, they moved that link to this site instead:

            http://www.nationalimmigrationreform.org/

            Good luck.

            Comment


            • #7
              CARPI
              I responded to the 'notice of intent to deny' and got an unusually fast response. Within a week I got a decision/denial letter. They also enclosed an appeal letter and gave me 30 days to submit the appeal. My submission was in New York. I am not sure if its the now current processing time.

              For some people it takes a very long time, even six months to more than a year. I think there is no clear standard. Their ways are all over the map.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Loue:
                can you please tell me how much Mr. shusterman charge for Css/Lulac case.
                Thank you
                Hi Loue,

                Sorry I can't tell you how much he charged me, it's kind of confidential.
                It was expensive, but at the end he got me the GC.

                Freedom1.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Freedom1,

                  What advice would you give me in preparing for my interview which is upcoming on May 15. I came to the US when I was 1, I had earlier submitted pictures, affidavits, immunization records, some school records, and other relevant evidence from my father including his bank statements, bills, checks, driver's license, etc. I had an interview back in the fall of 03 under the Life ACT provision, and that case has been pending ever since. I recall that the case officer didn't really ask me much except when I last entered the country and if I had done my medical clearance or not.

                  Currently I work in medical education as a medical writer, I have authored clinical articles that have been published in internationally-reknown medical journals (ie, JSM, IJCP, CMRO, JAC, JFP). I plan to take some professional letters of recommendations as well. I am due to be interviewed by some pharmaceutical companies including Allergan Healthcare based out in california and Medimmune in maryland. I have been working in medical education for the past 5 years now and have a double-bachelors in computer science and biochemistry. I was accepted in medical school in 03 but couldn't attend due to my immigration status.

                  My father was able to adjust his immigration status based on an employment sponsorship, but unfortunately I had turned 21 a month before his visa date became available. Therefore, all of my family including my extended family reside here in the US. My younger brother is a US citizen and my other brother as well as my parents will be citizens in a few years time.

                  Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

                  Kind regards

                  Shabber

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Shabber:
                    Freedom1,

                    What advice would you give me in preparing for my interview which is upcoming on May 15. I came to the US when I was 1, I had earlier submitted pictures, affidavits, immunization records, some school records, and other relevant evidence from my father including his bank statements, bills, checks, driver's license, etc. I had an interview back in the fall of 03 under the Life ACT provision, and that case has been pending ever since. I recall that the case officer didn't really ask me much except when I last entered the country and if I had done my medical clearance or not.

                    Currently I work in medical education as a medical writer, I have authored clinical articles that have been published in internationally-reknown medical journals (ie, JSM, IJCP, CMRO, JAC, JFP). I plan to take some professional letters of recommendations as well. I am due to be interviewed by some pharmaceutical companies including Allergan Healthcare based out in california and Medimmune in maryland. I have been working in medical education for the past 5 years now and have a double-bachelors in computer science and biochemistry. I was accepted in medical school in 03 but couldn't attend due to my immigration status.

                    My father was able to adjust his immigration status based on an employment sponsorship, but unfortunately I had turned 21 a month before his visa date became available. Therefore, all of my family including my extended family reside here in the US. My younger brother is a US citizen and my other brother as well as my parents will be citizens in a few years time.

                    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

                    Kind regards

                    Shabber
                    Hi Shabber,

                    I'm sorry I took too long to reply.

                    Well, I think you need to concentrate on your arrival and departure dates, the interviewing officer will work on this to make sure there are no discrepancies. If the affidavits you presented were not notarized, you can take care of them right now and bring them to your interview. Notarized affidavits have more weight as they're signed under penalty of perjury.
                    You seem to have enough evidence to prove that you've been here for the required time periods.

                    During your interview, make sure you don't unknowingly offer any information to the officer. Limit yourself in answering just the questions asked and nothing else. You don't want the officer start digging for ways to deny your application.
                    Most officers are professionals but there are bad apples as well. If the officer gets rude, ask to speak with his/her supervisor. The last thing the officer wants is to have his/her supervisor involved, since at this point is the supervisor the one that takes control of the interview.

                    Even though what you have accomplished in this country is impressive, try to make sure sure you don't appear to be too cocky, but at the same time make sure the officer understands that you've been a successful member of our society and that you won't be a burden to the government.

                    Let me know if you have any more questions.

                    Freedom1

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Freedom1,

                      What you said is so true. I should have retained an attorney, as you did. But I thought my case was totally bullet proof. I qualified so easily and had a ton of invincible evidence.

                      Somehow I got on the wrong side of the CIS Officer. The Officer was very cruel, and rude throughout the meeting. (he would never have behaved that way if an attorney was present) He desperately searched for a reason to deny my case. In the end he con-cocked a bogus (incorrect counting of dates) reason to deny my case. He told me on the spot I was being denied. The day after my interview I returned with a polite letter for him, pointing out his error. That only got him angrier. I was then sent an "Intent to Deny" based on a lie. He said that I had told him under oath that I had left the Country for several months in 1984. Naturally I never said that.

                      When I answered the intent to deny, unfortunately I was somewhat sarcastic and combative with my response. I complained profusely about the Officer. (I was quite depressed by getting the intent to deny letter) My emotions effected my judgement, my reply should have been light and polite. Several months went by and I received no answer.

                      At that point I made the fatal mistake. I sent in a letter requesting another interview with a different officer, in exchange I would wave my right to an appeal. I agreed to leave the Country if anyone could find a flaw in my case.

                      The new officer was not amused by me, or my response letter. I was put through a very intense 2+ hour interrogation. After the interrogation the new officer could find nothing wrong. But I did!! I found a mistake in my own testimony. I feared that the new officer might figure it out as it would be reviewed again, so I decided to make a correction. It was a very small typo, I had just mixed up a date by 2 days. Nothing that would put me over any time limits, in fact it was a subtraction. It was something that would have made no difference. But because I made a correction, it disqualified me from my CSS membership. My membership was approved based on what I said the first time. Naturally if anyone else were to send in a written correction of a date that was benign. I would not ever be a detriment. But when you turn the USCIS against you, even a small insignificant correction can be fatal.

                      In the end I out smarted myself, and destroyed my own case. Unbelievable, the fact is I could have, should have, and would have been approved very easily because I totally qualify. I just didn't know when to shut up.

                      Goodbye USA.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Freedom1,

                        Well the affidavits that I had submitted some from my aunts and uncles and some from family friends were not notorized, but I had attached a copy of their US passports with them.

                        One thing I don't understand is how the USCIS expects people to remember the specifics of when they were infants. I mean parents and relatives can be a source but overtime even they may forget details. This whole legalization process kind of feels dehumanizing apart from frustrating to me. I am having to prove that I had broken the law at the age of 1 to be eligble for legalization. How in the world can an infant of one year possibly break the law?

                        Shabber

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          i agree with you shabber!

                          i have the EXACT same situation as yours.

                          god bless america!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            LA Boy,

                            I'm coming out to LA, will be there till sat 3pm. Call me if you want to meet up.

                            Contact me via PM if you want my contact info.

                            Just wondering, can you tell me what evidence you provided to the INS as part of your application and how much of it was your dad's information. My interview is on Tuesday 15th of May, and I'm very anxious ahead of it.

                            Thanks

                            Shabber

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Shabber:
                              LA Boy,

                              I'm coming out to LA, will be there till sat 3pm. Call me if you want to meet up.



                              Just wondering, can you tell me what evidence you provided to the INS as part of your application and how much of it was your dad's information. My interview is on Tuesday 15th of May, and I'm very anxious ahead of it.

                              Thanks

                              Shabber
                              Just a heads up that you posted your phone number on a public forum (access worldwide). You might want to delete your post and communicate with LABoy via the PM feature on this board.

                              Comment

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