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  • u.s born citizen removed from the united states

    my story might seem really unsual, and i myself would have thought it impossible a while ago, but after my experience and several similar incidences which i read of on the internet i see that this is a common trend.
    i was born in the united states, in west virgina. however, i did not grow up in the u.s. my parents brought me back to the u.s when i was almost 15 yrs old. by the time i was 24 i had gotten in trouble with the law. i spent a couple of months in jail and was let out, my citizenship was never in doubt and i was never placed in immigration proceedings. why should i? i am an american citizen!!!!
    in mid 2004 i was in a carribean club(i'm from the carribean by ancestry) in long island,ny. as the club was winding up, there was a scuffle and a gun shot, before you know it the police was picking up anyone they could lay their hands on, unfortunately i was picked up too. before i knew it i was in one of the precints in n.y.even though i was not directly involved, my probation from my earlier sentnce which i served years ago was violated( for having "any" contact with the police) and i was sent back to jail.
    while in jail i was contacted by immigration authorities. i did not think nothing of this, i just simply assumed that because most of the people that were picked up were predominantly of carribean descent, and some might even have been in the country illegally, that immigration was trying to verify whom was who.
    on the day of my release, i was accosted by immigration authorities outside the jail and arrested. before i knew it i was immediately driven to the j.f.k airport. upon my insistence that i was a u.s citizen, a supervisor advised that i should be placed in immigration proceedings instead of being deported immediately. thats when my nightmare began.
    in court i told the judge my citizenship status but he told me the burden of proof was on me to prove that i was born in the u.s, by submitting documents. how could i do that when i was incarcerated? also ,when i was asked where i was born i stated erronously that i was born in "virginiainstead of "west virginia"
    never the less, immigration authorities claimed that in trying to verify my birth place s viginia, to have checked with the "probation office" in virginia and there seems to be no record of me there.
    even though i gave the wrong place of birth, since when did a probation office become the place to check for birth records, as far as i know i have never been in virgina , therefore i have never been in trouble there so how could anyrecord of me have been reasonably expected to be found there.
    we went back and forth on this and i asked the judge to release me on bail he said no, so i asked to be deported he also said no that there was chance that i was a citizen and i couldnt be deported. i was given the option to leave the country voluntarily and go verify my citizenship claim with the u.s consulate in the country where i grew up.
    if i committed a crime wasnt i meant to be deported if i was an alien? that they knew they had screwed up somehow and both the judge, i.c.e attorney and maybe even my lawyer, were trying to cover it up.
    before i left however i demanded on the record( the judge turned off the tape recorder when i started to speak, and only turned it on when i refused to say anything until he turned it back on) that an investigation be conducted to ascertain my place of birth . the judge the directed that an f.b.i background check be conducted on my person.
    well, just three days ago i recieved a call from my girlfriend that she recieved a letter in the mail and that the f.b.i check said that i was born in a town in " west virgina", instead of virginia as i had claimed.
    i know some people may get offended by this but i know that if an american of european descent was in the same scenario he'd never have been placed in deportation proceedings.
    while here, i met another american citizen or carribean descent who was deported here even though he was born in new york. fortunately for him though, his flight back to the states has been arranged by the state dept, but he had to wait 3 long years before making this journey. and that is only after he signed what he told me was " a waiver of responsibility" which in essence means he cant sue for getting deported from his own country. he signed it real quick just to be back with his family. ironically, the same u.s passport, birth certificate, and social security number that he showed to back up his claim of birth in the u.s , and was rejected by the authorities, is what is being used to ferry him back home!!!! he was only allowed back after the completion of his f.b.i background check.
    now my question is how do i proceed with this information. as i have learned the govt will always do anything to cover its tracks, i am not foolish enough to try to confront the govt or sue because i know the system, it'll gobble u up.

  • #2
    my story might seem really unsual, and i myself would have thought it impossible a while ago, but after my experience and several similar incidences which i read of on the internet i see that this is a common trend.
    i was born in the united states, in west virgina. however, i did not grow up in the u.s. my parents brought me back to the u.s when i was almost 15 yrs old. by the time i was 24 i had gotten in trouble with the law. i spent a couple of months in jail and was let out, my citizenship was never in doubt and i was never placed in immigration proceedings. why should i? i am an american citizen!!!!
    in mid 2004 i was in a carribean club(i'm from the carribean by ancestry) in long island,ny. as the club was winding up, there was a scuffle and a gun shot, before you know it the police was picking up anyone they could lay their hands on, unfortunately i was picked up too. before i knew it i was in one of the precints in n.y.even though i was not directly involved, my probation from my earlier sentnce which i served years ago was violated( for having "any" contact with the police) and i was sent back to jail.
    while in jail i was contacted by immigration authorities. i did not think nothing of this, i just simply assumed that because most of the people that were picked up were predominantly of carribean descent, and some might even have been in the country illegally, that immigration was trying to verify whom was who.
    on the day of my release, i was accosted by immigration authorities outside the jail and arrested. before i knew it i was immediately driven to the j.f.k airport. upon my insistence that i was a u.s citizen, a supervisor advised that i should be placed in immigration proceedings instead of being deported immediately. thats when my nightmare began.
    in court i told the judge my citizenship status but he told me the burden of proof was on me to prove that i was born in the u.s, by submitting documents. how could i do that when i was incarcerated? also ,when i was asked where i was born i stated erronously that i was born in "virginiainstead of "west virginia"
    never the less, immigration authorities claimed that in trying to verify my birth place s viginia, to have checked with the "probation office" in virginia and there seems to be no record of me there.
    even though i gave the wrong place of birth, since when did a probation office become the place to check for birth records, as far as i know i have never been in virgina , therefore i have never been in trouble there so how could anyrecord of me have been reasonably expected to be found there.
    we went back and forth on this and i asked the judge to release me on bail he said no, so i asked to be deported he also said no that there was chance that i was a citizen and i couldnt be deported. i was given the option to leave the country voluntarily and go verify my citizenship claim with the u.s consulate in the country where i grew up.
    if i committed a crime wasnt i meant to be deported if i was an alien? that they knew they had screwed up somehow and both the judge, i.c.e attorney and maybe even my lawyer, were trying to cover it up.
    before i left however i demanded on the record( the judge turned off the tape recorder when i started to speak, and only turned it on when i refused to say anything until he turned it back on) that an investigation be conducted to ascertain my place of birth . the judge the directed that an f.b.i background check be conducted on my person.
    well, just three days ago i recieved a call from my girlfriend that she recieved a letter in the mail and that the f.b.i check said that i was born in a town in " west virgina", instead of virginia as i had claimed.
    i know some people may get offended by this but i know that if an american of european descent was in the same scenario he'd never have been placed in deportation proceedings.
    while here, i met another american citizen or carribean descent who was deported here even though he was born in new york. fortunately for him though, his flight back to the states has been arranged by the state dept, but he had to wait 3 long years before making this journey. and that is only after he signed what he told me was " a waiver of responsibility" which in essence means he cant sue for getting deported from his own country. he signed it real quick just to be back with his family. ironically, the same u.s passport, birth certificate, and social security number that he showed to back up his claim of birth in the u.s , and was rejected by the authorities, is what is being used to ferry him back home!!!! he was only allowed back after the completion of his f.b.i background check.
    now my question is how do i proceed with this information. as i have learned the govt will always do anything to cover its tracks, i am not foolish enough to try to confront the govt or sue because i know the system, it'll gobble u up.

    Comment


    • #3
      see this is the reason i cant phantom how some people think. john doe if u calmed down and read all i wrote u would see that u already had the answers to the stupid questions that u r asking

      1. i was not sure where i was born, believe me it is a common occurence, at least where i was raised in the states. usually, i know people that if they even knew what state they were born , did not know the city.

      2 . i had no birth certificate because it was never in my possesion. also, i applied to the wrong vital statistics office for one when my troubles started bubbling ova. (irginia instead of west virginia.)

      3. ok , now ur stupidity is now getting annoying. i did keep off crime. my one mistake came back to haunt me in the form of a probation violation, not because i commited another crime but because i had "police contact" in the club altercation.

      yes i did tell u i went to jail once for a coupla months and i got probation violated on that crime for something i had no business in. does that establish a pattern to you?
      yes by virtue of my previous criminal record(s) i am a criminal, does that satisfy u ? and is that gonna make u come when u jer k off tonight?

      finally, if u read what i said from the beginning, i have no intentions of suing the government. they would only make my life hell if i tried. could you please scroll back up and read about the guy that had his u.s passport , birth cert, social and all other identifying documents and still got deported to his parent's country? did u see that he was made to sign a waiver that excluded immigration from having any faults in deporting a u.s citizen, in essence laying all the blame on the deportee. if he refused to sign that waiver they'd always come back and say his documents were false!!!!
      i am only writing this on here to enlighten people about this phenomenon. this is something that is being put in the back burner and is always happenning on the hush-hush.
      yes, we commited crimes thats why this happenned to us. but since when did banishment become the prerequiste for u.s citizens, not even legalised ones. actually there are instances of law abiding u.s born citizens being deported for no reason other than the fact that the i.c.e agent did not think they looked american enough and did not believe their documents.
      thank God my case has been resolved. u can sit on your computer screens and label me a criminal, but remember the point of all of this is that those of us that were sent out of our own country mistakenly were first generation , born childern of immigrants. today its me, tommorrow it might be the turn of your kids.

      for more on this issue go to google and type in the following names:

      thomas sylvain
      sharon mcknight
      jose antonio salgado
      romeo deleon

      after u do that make sure u always have your brown or darkskinned kids carry their birth certificate everywhere they go. not that that would help much....

      Comment


      • #4
        Jackfinch, I'm sorry that all of that happened to you and it is hard to believe that it is happening to citizens but a lot of people don't realize that we are gradually losing our civil rights yet nothing is being done about it. Anyway, separate subject-you really applied to the wrong state for your birth certificate? Honestly, you seem brighter than that. I don't mean to be overly critical but that doesn't even seem possible to me. And, you've never had to have a birth certificate for ANYTHING?

        Comment


        • #5
          What happened to you was a travesty. Contact the NAACP or some other civil rights organization and tell them your story.
          To john doe...its immigrants like you who get on my last nerve. As a US citizen he has a right to be a serial killer(Dahmer, Gacy etc) and not be deported. Thats the bottom line. I didnt have a copy of my birtj certificate until about 1 yr ago when i had to ask my mother to fed ex it to me in the us. Its not normal to walk around with your birth certificate for most people.

          Comment


          • #6
            It is pathetic that so many people play the "race card." It is even more pathetic when an immigrant leaves his Third-World village and then complains about being a "minority" in America...a country that most likely has treated him better than the country in which he was born. I'm not really sure what a "minority" is...I guess that it is a word to describe people who feel inadequate and rather sorry for themselves. If America is really soooo bad for those who are not of European descent, then why are thousands and thousands of Mexicans walking north through our southwestern deserts as I write this...and none are walking south?

            Comment


            • #7
              JohnDoe: For your information, the United States has been very involved in trying to help the people of Darfur. Our government has tried to put a lot of pressure on the sovereign (and anti-American) government of Sudan to resolve the issues in Darfur.

              As for the issue of low-skilled immigrants. Quite honestly, America would be better off if the vast majority of our immigrants were capable of being doctors and scientists and financial analysts. Educated people create vastly more wealth than under-educated people.

              You claim to be "stating facts" about issues for which you present no facts, but simply state your prejudiced opinion. In an earlier post, you said: "I guarantee that if this guy was white or say from the UK, he would NOT have been deported." Quite apart from the fact that this in an offensive (racist?) statement, what evidence do you have to support your supposed "guarantee?"

              If jackfinch is, indeed, a U.S. citizen, and you only have his say-so that he is, then I would suggest that he ultimately was deported because he's not very smart, rather than because his skin isn't white. If he couldn't provide evidence of his citizenship, and gave an incorrect location for his birth when the authorities tried to verify same, you think that they were "racist" to deport him? Jackfinch says that returned to America when he was almost 15 years old. He must have had a passport. Where were his family? Why weren't they helping him get the necessary documents to prove his citizenship? I guess, however, that it's easier just to play the "race card."

              One other thought: I wonder why they didn't try to deport him when he got out of jail the first time. Maybe he was just lucky and was released on the conspiracy theorists' day off.

              Comment


              • #8
                JohnDoe: You assert that jackfinch is spanish...but, I think that his ancestry is Caribbean. I'm sure that if he really was Spanish then, under your (racist?) reasoning, he wouldn't have been deported...Spaniards are white Europeans after all.

                Like I said earlier: if a U.S. citizen gets deported because they can't prove that they are, in fact, an American, then they are not very smart.

                With that said, I'm bored with you already. I will not get drawn into a senseless discussion with you when you are obviously prejudiced and looking for racism in every action. I believe that America deserves immigrants who hold the country in high regard, which you obviously do not.

                Comment


                • #9
                  A person must have on blinders to not know that racism and discrimination still exist. It's not just in the US though, by any means. I'm sure there are areas of the US that you could live where it would not be blatantly evident but in many areas it is. I have no idea if that influenced JackFinch's situation. I hadn't even thought of passport but I still don't understand not knowing what state you are born in.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    sundeville u say if a u.s citizen gets deported its because they are not very smart. well, i tell u this if a u.s citizen gets deported its because they are not WHITE!!!! yes i said it now gte mad and go jump off the grand canyons.
                    the fact is a lot of people have a common perception of what an american is meant to look like, without wanting to agree to the fact that the u.s.a is made up of a very diverse culture that is not only anglo-saxon.
                    to still learning, believe me go to the inner cities and find out from young kids that were my age at the time when i first came back to the states, i bet u 3/10 do not know where they were born. if they tell u a certain place go find out and they are wrong. we obviously live in different worlds, for this to sound unbelievable.
                    the truth is that when a lot of people come here as immigrants ( and i have a whole lotta relatives that go thru this) they are more averse to keeping documentation as they try in their bid to become u.s citizens. when u are born here thats all u know, "i was born here". when my travails started a majority of my boys used to come and visit me in detention and a common joke we used to share was that they may get deported soon to 'cause they didnt have any idea how to get their birth certificate.
                    yes, i seem very bright and i feel so foolish that i ever went thru this ordeal in the first place. no, i never had a reason for my birth certificate.
                    as i said earlier if u think 'cause i said the wrong state of birth, then what about the u.s citizens that got deported even though they had all the proper documentation i.e u.s passport , birt cert, social, license e.t.c . the point is when u have an over zealous immigration authority that refuses to believe that u can be a u.s citizen because of your skin color , then sooner or later you can find yourself in my shoes!!!!
                    once again please just go to google search and type in the names below then ask yourselves why they ever were put on a plane and sent outside their own country!!!!

                    thomas sylvain
                    sharon mcknight
                    jose antonio salgado
                    romeo deleon

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      VERY INTERESTING I JUST FOUND THIS ARTICLE . FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO STILL THINK IT IS UNUSUAL FOR AMERICANS NOT TO TO KNOW WHERE THEY WERE BORN, THIS IS A SURPRISING STORY OF AN OBVIOUSLY WELL KNOWN, WELL EDUCATED AMERICAN.
                      BUT GUESS WHAT, HE WAS ALLOWED BACK INTO THE COUNTRY EVEN WITHOUT PROOF THAT HE WAS A CITIZEN. HMMMN, I WONDER WHY?!! U WANT ME TO PLAY THE RACE CARD AGAIN?!


                      More From The Huntsville Times | Subscribe To The Huntsville Times

                      Radio exec learns he's not who he thinks and can't prove citizenship
                      By PATRICIA C. McCARTER
                      Times Staff Writer patriciacm@htimes.com
                      1/17/2005

                      Armed with a file folder of documents with his name on them, Steve Murry pleaded with a customs agent in St. Petersburg, Fla., to let him back in the United States.

                      Missing from the file was the one thing the customs agent wanted - his passport.

                      But Murry, 52, didn't have a passport. When he tried to get one before he went on the cruise late last year, he was turned down because he couldn't find his birth certificate. He'd never needed it before.

                      His parents and three siblings had been dead for years. There was no one to vouch for his birthdate or birthplace.

                      He called his great-great-aunt Adell in New York City. He didn't know her well, but he asked if she knew if he was born in New Jersey. He thought he remembered someone saying he was born there.

                      No, she told him.

                      You weren't born in New Jersey.

                      And you weren't born to Hepsie and William. They just raised you.

                      You aren't who you think you are.

                      Worst of all, you can't prove you belong here.

                      No paper trail

                      How could he get a Social Security number, a driver's license and a high school diploma without a birth certificate?

                      How did he get a security clearance in the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War without a birth certificate?

                      "I'm told it was a different world then," Murry said. "Back in 1952, it wasn't that unusual for a baby to be born at home. But the midwife was supposed to file records at the courthouse after she attended a birth. That didn't happen.

                      "That leads me to believe there wasn't a doctor or a midwife at my birth. So far, nobody knows who was there."

                      Murry's great-great-aunt said she thinks he was born to his father's niece - a woman Murry had never heard of - and to a soldier from Puerto Rico. He said his racial mixing or out-of-wedlock status probably embarrassed the family, which is why they kept his identity a secret.

                      Murry, the program manager of local R&B/hip-hop radio station WEUP and a Huntsville resident for 20 years, said there's no one else to ask for more details.

                      There are no documents to suggest his adoption was legal, no mention of him in a family Bible, not even a photo of him from his toddler days. The only immunization record he found had his nickname, "Sandy," on it.

                      "A passing band of gypsies could've dropped me off," he said. "I'm serious. There were people like that who came through town."

                      During his early years, schools didn't require documentation like they do today. "A woman could walk in, say she was my mother, and the school would enroll me," he said. "And I guess once you're in the system, you're set."

                      Murry contacted Public School 41 in the Queens borough of New York to see which records it had on him. It had what he already knew: his name, his address, the people he'd been told were his parents.

                      He petitioned the Marines for his records, but his story gets even stranger there.

                      Until he was 17, his name was Steven Darryl Faggs. After high school, he wanted to join the Marines, but his mother wouldn't hear of it. He got his stepfather, Steve Murry, to sign him up. Without any proof of his identity, the Marines took him in, Pvt. Steven Darryl Murry, and shipped him off to war.

                      He's been known as Steve Murry ever since.

                      No legal help

                      If he seeks naturalized citizenship, the government could deny his application and deport him.

                      "Where could they deport me to?" he said. "I'm from here. It's crazy.

                      "I feel let down by my country, like it's not claiming me as its own."

                      The prospect was scary, but it didn't keep him from leaving the country. A scuba diver, Murry wanted a vacation with his wife last fall, to explore the ocean floor of the Caribbean.

                      "Because our bus had to take a detour and got us to the cruise ship late, leaving the country wasn't that hard," he said. "But the whole time we were gone, I was wondering how I was going to get back in.

                      "I brought every piece of legal paperwork I had with my name on it - my mortgage bill, utility bill, W2, things I'd hoped would prove I lived in America."

                      Murry hired Montgomery lawyer Benjamin Farrow to search immigration laws and consult with the U.S. State Department, but he found no answers.

                      "Never in my life have I heard of something like this," Farrow said. "By the time we talked, Steve had already tried everything I could think of to try. There's no legal remedy.

                      "With all of the homeland security issues out there, it's just a matter of time before the government requires a document he does not have. If he files an application for citizenship, he'd basically be saying, 'I'm not an American citizen, but please make me one.'

                      "His legal options are disastrous."

                      Farrow told Murry that if he could narrow his birth state possibilities, he would be better off to hire a private investigator to help rebuild his identity than to file a citizenship application with the federal government and face possible deportation.

                      Farrow said getting kicked out of the country seems unlikely for Murry, "but it isn't out of the realm of possibility."

                      Murry asked the office of U.S. Rep. Bud Cramer, D-Huntsville, for passport help. The case is continuing, but it's gone nowhere, too, without a birth certificate.

                      Murry thought he had the answer when he quizzed the man who was married to his sister Mae Faggs Starr, who won a gold medal in track at the Olympic Games in Helsinki, Finland, in 1952. If Aug. 3, 1952, is indeed Murry's birthday as he's been told, his sister was at the Olympics when he was born. Starr died in 2000.

                      Eddie Starr told Murry that when he first visited the Faggs home, there was no baby in the family.

                      A year later, he returned to visit the family when he and Mae got engaged. At that time, he was introduced to little Sandy, who was 3 or 4.

                      "Even though he signed an affidavit saying that he knew I was in the family at a very young age, he couldn't swear to when and where I was born," Murry said. "And that's what it's going to take."

                      Blood ties

                      Murry has three sons, Cedar, Amon and Steven, all grown and raised. When he looks at them, he knows he's looking at people who share his blood. He doesn't know for sure if, beyond his sons, he has ever met a blood relative.

                      "I always felt a little unattached, a little bit alone," he said. "I thought it was because my siblings were almost 20 years older than me and because my parents were old, since my first memory. I thought I was an 'oops' baby.

                      "I never looked like any of them. They were shorter, darker, different. It makes sense now."

                      They were good to him. He and his mother grew closer before she died 10 years ago, but that feels tainted now. He's been angry and sad over what he feels was a big lie.

                      "It's an awful thing to hide someone's lineage," he said. "It's like stealing something that I don't know how to get back."

                      With that armload of paperwork and a convincing story, Murry was able to return to the United States after the cruise. The customs agent was overwhelmed by Murry's stack of documents and by the long line of people standing behind him.

                      He waved Murry through.

                      "All that worry, and they let me in," he said. "It makes you wonder why they make getting a passport so hard if you can get in the country without one.

                      "I can't count on that happening the next time."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        THIS IS FOR THOSE THAT THINK IT IS IMPOSSIBLE, OR THAT WHEN IT HAPPENS ITS JUST EASY TO HOP ON A PLANE AN COME BACK AND ASSERT YOUR RIGHTFUL U.S CITIZENSHIP. THE GOVT ALWAYS TRIES TO COVER UP IT'S TRACKS, BESIDES IT TAKES YRS. READ ON.... BE SCARED FOR YOUR KIDS COLOREDS!!!!!

                        May 22, 2005

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                        U.S. Deports Citizen
                        Bookstore

                        Color Lines: Affirmative Action, Immigration, and Civil Rights Options for America

                        Attorney Jesús Peña filed documents during the week of June 3 asking a Manhattan federal court to set aside a deportation order for his client, Deolinda Smith, a 71-year-old U.S. citizen born in Ossining, New York, who the Immigration and Naturalization Service deported to the Dominican Republic in February of this year. Smith, who suffers from paranoid schizophrenia, diabetes and a heart condition, was arrested in April 1997 and subsequently convicted of attempted manslaughter after stabbing a neighbor. She was released to a U.S. mental institution in 2001. Negotiations over her return to the United States are reportedly under way with the State Department. (New York Post

                        Expedited Removal

                        By Karen Musalo

                        On June 10, 2000, Sharon McKnight, a United States citizen of Jamaican ethnicity, arrived at New York's John F. Kennedy Airport on a flight from Jamaica, where she had been visiting her sick grandfather. McKnight is 35 years old and has the mental capacity of a young child; her family members were concerned about her traveling by herself and were awaiting her arrival at the airport. When she did not appear several hours after her flight landed, they became concerned and began to make inquiries. They learned that the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) had taken her into custody because they thought her passport was fake and that she was attempting to commit fraud. In an effort to persuade INS that they were mistaken, the family members secured a copy of Ms. McKnight's birth certificate, showing that she had been born in the United States, but INS was not swayed by the evidence. Ms. McKnight remained handcuffed and was left overnight in a room at the airport, with her legs shackled to a chair. She was not fed nor permitted to use the bathroom, and in the morning she was returned to Jamaica. Upon her arrival there, she was able to find her way to the home of a relative after baggage porters at the airport donated her bus fare.

                        Eight days later, with the assistance of New York Representative Michael Forbes, her status as a U.S. citizen was confirmed in a meeting with the U.S. Consul General in Jamaica and reviewed by State Department officials in Washington, D.C., and McKnight was permitted to return to the U.S. The INS apologized for its error. McKnight, who has stated that she was treated "like an animal," believes she will have nightmares the rest of her life as a result of what she suffered.

                        Sharon McKnight was a casualty of expedited removal procedures, enacted

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You guys cut it out all the C R AP. and suggest him what to do next instead of barking on each others.. forget about race, color etc and do the right thing...
                          For you ( origional pastor), you should apply for your birth certificate from birth and death records, the take the birth certificate and apply for passport in US consulate Or get the travel document and travel back. thats all.
                          of course burden of proof is rely on you. to prove that you are the person who you said you are. how you are going to prove ,its upto you.
                          Its a discussion, not a legal advise..

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            so i asked to be deported he also said no that there was chance that i was a citizen and i couldnt be deported. i was given the option to leave the country voluntarily and go verify my citizenship claim with the u.s consulate in the country where i grew up.

                            This still puzzles me. So, the gov made one stab to help you prove your citizenship and then wouldn't do more..... could you not (through your attorney or friend) request bc from west virginia once you realized your error? Are you not already verifying your citizenship with the consulate wherever you are?

                            Comment

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