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  • Immigration Now Impacting College-Educated Employment And Incomes

    http://www.vdare.com/asp/printPage.a...ent_impact.htm
    VDARE.COM - http://www.vdare.com/rubenstein/employment_impact.htm

    March 25, 2004

    National Data, By Edwin S. Rubenstein
    Immigration Now Impacting College-Educated Employment And Incomes
    Why is this recovery different from all others? Answer: not only is it jobless, but college-educated workers are bearing a disproportionate share of the brunt.

    Amazingly, there are currently more unemployed workers with college degrees than there are unemployed high school dropouts. The available data series suggests this has never happened before. [See the Economic Policy Institute's recent monograph "Unemployment level of college grads surpasses that of high school dropouts"]

    It's trendy, and apparently politically permissible, to blame this carnage among the college-educated on outsourcing. But immigration is a far more important cause. Foreigners represent a rapidly growing share of the total college-educated workforce"”and a still larger share of the unemployed. [See table.]

    From 2000 to 2002, a period roughly equivalent to the recent recession:

    The number of college-educated immigrants in the labor force rose by 19.4 percent

    The number of college-educated U.S. born rose 4.9 percent

    Unemployment rate among college-educated foreign born rose to 4.2 percent from 2.3 percent

    Unemployment rate among the corresponding U.S. born rose to 2.7 percent from 1.6 percent


    An often-cited study by economic consultants Forrester Research says that 3.3 million white-collar jobs will be lost to offshore outsourcing in the next 12 years. That comes to an average 275,000 million jobs lost per year.

    But, by comparison, the number of college-educated immigrants in the U.S. labor force jumped by 546,000 in 2002 alone. This influx must inevitably displace Americans in the short run, whatever its long-run benefits. And it is accelerating.

    In 2002 (the latest year of available data) 14.2 percent of all college-educated workers in the U.S. were immigrants. Some 39.9 percent of high school drop-outs in the workforce were immigrants, but only 10.1 percent of workers with a high school degree or some college. One researcher calls this a case of the Disappearing Middle – immigrants today tend to fall into either very low or very high skill levels.

    From 2000 to 2002, the number of immigrants in the workforce with a bachelor's degree or better grew 19.4 percent. The number of immigrant high school dropouts grew 15 percent. The number of intermediate immigrant workers with a high school degree or some college grew only 11.4 percent. This once again demonstrated the bipolar distribution of the current immigrant flow.

    Many educated foreigners come here on student visas. Some 13 percent eventually obtain a "green card," the permanent–residence visa. Others stay here illegally. The H-1b program is another source of educated foreign workers, mainly in the high-tech IT industry. Until recently 195,000 H-1bs were admitted annually, contributing to a glut in an industry that has more than half a million un- or under-employed programmers. The H-1b cap was last raised in 2000"”just as the high-tech bubble burst. U.S. employers are still hiring H-1bs and firing native techies.

    But unemployment figures alone do not capture the full pain inflicted by immigrant workers. They also impact income. Displaced natives may find work in other fields, but at far lower pay levels. A recent pathbreaking paper by George Borjas, "The Labor Demand Curve Is Downward Sloping: Re-Examining The Impact of Immigration On the Labor Market." confirmed what elementary economic theory had long maintained: all other things being equal, when you increase the supply of something, its price will fall.

    In particular, Borjas found that immigration reduced the wages of native-born college graduates by an average of 4.9 percent. The impact was greatest on college graduates with 11-15 years experience"”i.e. most likely to have young families"”where it amounted to 5.9 percent

    Borjas findings' are based on immigration inflows through the year 2000. Today the foreign born share of the educated workforce is about 20 percent higher.......and rising without limit"”at least if the Bush Administration gets its way.

    [Number fans click here for tables.]

  • #2
    http://www.vdare.com/asp/printPage.a...ent_impact.htm
    VDARE.COM - http://www.vdare.com/rubenstein/employment_impact.htm

    March 25, 2004

    National Data, By Edwin S. Rubenstein
    Immigration Now Impacting College-Educated Employment And Incomes
    Why is this recovery different from all others? Answer: not only is it jobless, but college-educated workers are bearing a disproportionate share of the brunt.

    Amazingly, there are currently more unemployed workers with college degrees than there are unemployed high school dropouts. The available data series suggests this has never happened before. [See the Economic Policy Institute's recent monograph "Unemployment level of college grads surpasses that of high school dropouts"]

    It's trendy, and apparently politically permissible, to blame this carnage among the college-educated on outsourcing. But immigration is a far more important cause. Foreigners represent a rapidly growing share of the total college-educated workforce"”and a still larger share of the unemployed. [See table.]

    From 2000 to 2002, a period roughly equivalent to the recent recession:

    The number of college-educated immigrants in the labor force rose by 19.4 percent

    The number of college-educated U.S. born rose 4.9 percent

    Unemployment rate among college-educated foreign born rose to 4.2 percent from 2.3 percent

    Unemployment rate among the corresponding U.S. born rose to 2.7 percent from 1.6 percent


    An often-cited study by economic consultants Forrester Research says that 3.3 million white-collar jobs will be lost to offshore outsourcing in the next 12 years. That comes to an average 275,000 million jobs lost per year.

    But, by comparison, the number of college-educated immigrants in the U.S. labor force jumped by 546,000 in 2002 alone. This influx must inevitably displace Americans in the short run, whatever its long-run benefits. And it is accelerating.

    In 2002 (the latest year of available data) 14.2 percent of all college-educated workers in the U.S. were immigrants. Some 39.9 percent of high school drop-outs in the workforce were immigrants, but only 10.1 percent of workers with a high school degree or some college. One researcher calls this a case of the Disappearing Middle – immigrants today tend to fall into either very low or very high skill levels.

    From 2000 to 2002, the number of immigrants in the workforce with a bachelor's degree or better grew 19.4 percent. The number of immigrant high school dropouts grew 15 percent. The number of intermediate immigrant workers with a high school degree or some college grew only 11.4 percent. This once again demonstrated the bipolar distribution of the current immigrant flow.

    Many educated foreigners come here on student visas. Some 13 percent eventually obtain a "green card," the permanent–residence visa. Others stay here illegally. The H-1b program is another source of educated foreign workers, mainly in the high-tech IT industry. Until recently 195,000 H-1bs were admitted annually, contributing to a glut in an industry that has more than half a million un- or under-employed programmers. The H-1b cap was last raised in 2000"”just as the high-tech bubble burst. U.S. employers are still hiring H-1bs and firing native techies.

    But unemployment figures alone do not capture the full pain inflicted by immigrant workers. They also impact income. Displaced natives may find work in other fields, but at far lower pay levels. A recent pathbreaking paper by George Borjas, "The Labor Demand Curve Is Downward Sloping: Re-Examining The Impact of Immigration On the Labor Market." confirmed what elementary economic theory had long maintained: all other things being equal, when you increase the supply of something, its price will fall.

    In particular, Borjas found that immigration reduced the wages of native-born college graduates by an average of 4.9 percent. The impact was greatest on college graduates with 11-15 years experience"”i.e. most likely to have young families"”where it amounted to 5.9 percent

    Borjas findings' are based on immigration inflows through the year 2000. Today the foreign born share of the educated workforce is about 20 percent higher.......and rising without limit"”at least if the Bush Administration gets its way.

    [Number fans click here for tables.]

    Comment


    • #3
      [copy-paste. From ILW.COM homepage]

      Foreign Affair

      by Yvette Lopez-Cooper

      After noting that there was nobody left to thank in New Zealand, the Academy Award winner for best actress, Charlize Theron, held her Oscar and tearfully exclaimed: "I'm going to thank everyone in South Africa - my home country - I'm bringing this home next week." As a teenager, Theron left her small town of Benoni in South Africa to pursue her dreams. Like so many other foreigners in the U.S. film industry, Charlize Theron has culturally enriched the United States.

      A large proportion of the winners and nominees for the 76th Academy Awards came from many parts of the world. And that does not even include those in the category for Best Foreign Film. The New Zealand crew from "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" achieved an extraordinary milestone, winning every Oscar in the eleven categories for which it was nominated, including Best Director and Best Picture. Other Kiwis up for Academy Awards included Keisha Castle-Hughes for her performance in "Whale Rider". The 13 year-old was the youngest person ever nominated for the best actress.

      In their acceptance speeches, Academy Award winners paid tribute to the immigrants in their lives. Winner of the Best Supporting Actress Award, Renie Zellweger thanked her "immigrant parents" for their support who are originally from Norway and Sweden. Moreover, many Academy Award nominated films were loaded with immigrant themes. The West African-born Djimon Hounsou was nominated for his role "In America," in which he played a man dying of AIDS who is befriended by the daughters of a family of undocumented Irish immigrants. While on the red carpet, Hounsou said that he hoped the film would serve as an educational tool for the entertainment industry, clearly referring to the lukewarm acceptance immigrants today are facing in the United States.

      Similarly, in the film "House of Sand and Fog" the Iranian actress Shohreh Aghdashloo played the wife of an exiled Iranian colonel who tries to pursue the American dream. Aghdashloo, who was nominated for Best Supporting Actress, has a personal connection to her character as she herself fled from Iran after the 1979 revolution. Like Hounsou, Aghdashloo has said she hopes her film changes people's attitudes about immigrants. The British actor, Sir Ben Kingsley, was also nominated for Best Actor for his role in the critically acclaimed film.

      Language barriers did not keep anyone away from the Oscar ceremonies. Best Supporting Actor nominee Ken Watanabe brought his own interpreter to the Oscars so he could speak Japanese at times. Watanabe, who lives in Tokyo and Los Angeles, was nominated for his dramatic samurai performance in "The Last Samurai." A French band performed the song "Belleville Rendez-vous," which was nominated for the Best Original Song. British singer-songwriters Sting and Elvis Costello were also up for the award. In the end, New Zealand's Fran Walsh, Canadian composer Howard Shore and British singer Annie Lennox took home the best-song Oscar for "Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King".

      Australia and Brazil's influences were also felt on Sunday evening. Aussie Peter Weir was nominated for Best Director for "Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World." Fernando Meirelles was also nominated Best Director for his work in "City of God" which included a cast filled with native Brazilians.

      Increasingly it has been recognized that the success of U.S. films in international markets is a critical factor in whether a film makes money or tanks. What we now have to recognize is the importance of foreigners working with U.S. partners in making those profits happen both at home and abroad. Strangely, with tighter immigration control, it is getting more difficult to bring these foreign workers into the U.S. Earlier this year, the former Buena Vista Social Club Cuban musician and Grammy nominee Ibrahim Ferrer was denied a visa to come into the U.S.

      Amid a growing hostile international environment, it's refreshing to see ethnic diversity being recognized in the U.S. film industry. Foreigners in the film industry not only continue to shape our views of the world, but also provide necessary revenue for the U.S. Indeed, foreigner entertainers are just one more example of the colorful American mosaic. Perhaps, this is what Charlize Theron showed South Africans when she took home the gold statuette.



      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      About The Author

      Yvette Lopez-Cooper is a former Department of Justice attorney and practices immigration law in Southern California. She can be reached at: yvetlopez@yahoo.com.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey Acelaw, I dare you to get one of your cut and paste articles from a CREDIBLE source. IE an organization who's soul purpose is a bit more honorable than griping LOL
        Have a nice day

        Comment


        • #5
          Gluhbirne--And just what would you consider "credible"? Perhaps something from AILA or George Bush's White House? Or one of the *** stories that the newspapers so often print about the poor "undocumented immigrant" whose problems are all brought on because he/she is only seeking "a better life" and we're so mean not to give it to them?

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes, E.--and the article's talking about legal immigrants, and people who don't immigrate at all, but simply work legally in the U.S. For that matter, Lord of the Rings was filmed in New Zealand, was it not? Not the U.S. at all.

            Also, notably, most of them are white. I'd be more impressed if a black South African had won the award, not a blue-eyed blonde.

            Comment


            • #7
              Aliba,

              it seems to me that you have some "black and white" issues.

              That's why I will avoid further comments about your statements.

              Comment


              • #8
                Black and white issues? Only when I read an article you post about the benefits of "diversity" from immigration and the figures prominently featured are anything but diverse, racially or culturally. With the exception of the 13-year-old, who is apparently Maori, all the examples cited were white and European. Nor are they typical of the immigrants, legal or illegal that we are currently getting the most of: Latin or Asian, many poorly educated or unskilled, who are eligible for immigration only because of family ties.

                Comment


                • #9
                  "With the exception of the 13-year-old, who is apparently Maori, all the examples cited were white and European"


                  Aliba:

                  Apparently you have superior reading comprehension skills.

                  [quote]Best Supporting Actor nominee Ken Watanabe brought his own interpreter to the Oscars so he could speak Japanese at times. Watanabe, who lives in Tokyo and Los Angeles, was nominated for his dramatic samurai performance in "The Last Samurai[end of quote]

                  I never knew,Aliba, that "Watanabe" is a "white and European" name. Nor did I know before that Tokyo as well as Japan is situated in Europe

                  How about Fernando Meirelles ?

                  Ah, but these are so atypical examples!
                  Unlike all those crime "statistics" and all the immigrant-bashing propaganda.
                  Of course we want to be "scientific" and very "accurate" and not judge the whole group because of few when it comes to "atypical","good examples".
                  But it is OK to do the opposite when examples are "bad" and serve our personal goal of vilifying all immigrants.

                  Smart fella you are, Aliba
                  Acelaw must be in love with you

                  Thank you for clarifications anyway.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    E.--The Oscars are an international event, and "Hollywood" is an idea, not just an American city. The people cited here are not necessarily Americans, or even immigrants, but people who work here, and find it convenient to come here on business. Is Mr. Watanabe an American, or even an immigrant? Is Mr. Mereilles? It sounds very much like they, and Peter Weir, retain their own national identities. Which is an extremely good argument as to why we should be concerned about who actually does immigrate and why.

                    As for scientific and accurate--no, we shouldn't judge everyone based on stereotypes. Which means that we shouldn't treat all immigrants as desirable (which is implied in this article) any more than we should say none are. Also, since you feel so strongly about statistics--the only reason for racial and ethnic classifications in government is statistical. To keep count of whether or not some group or another is getting its "fair share". I'm perfectly willing to not collect statistics, and to not provide services/programs based on them. I'm perfectly willing not to read government statistics that Blacks or Hispanics have higher drop out rates, and are underrepresented in colleges and universities--fine by me. Because these are the bases for providing special programs. No need, either for bilingual education, programs for minority home owners, translation services, medical clinics, programs for minority owned businesses, etc.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Oh, yes, E.--Some more statistics for you. Supporters of the DREAM Act claim that 50,000-65,000 illegal aliens graduate from U.S. high schools every year, and are unable to go on to college. They use these (very suspect) statistics as justification for providing legal status and financial aid to these students. My, my, my. Are you outraged by this use of statistics?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        E.--One more point. Since you're so concerned about "credible" sources, you might note that the author of the piece you posted makes her living from immigrants--the more immigrants, legal and illegal, and the more complicated the cases, the better for her.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Make out of this what you want but...:

                          in almost EVERY community of illegal immigrants -- the educational level of the schools is WAY below standard.

                          Meaning, american-born parents are pulling their kids and moving to better neighbourhoods. Would you want to raise your kid in a school where they're still learning basic grammar in grade 12 -- while others in a better neighbourhood are writing 20 page essays on Shakespeare??

                          -= nav =-

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Glühbirne

                            Hey Acelaw, I dare you to get one of your cut and paste articles from a CREDIBLE source. IE an organization who's soul purpose is a bit more honorable than griping LOL

                            Feel free to cut/paste any article from any source that gives us the facts on how GOOD THIS IS FOR OUR COUTRY!!!hmmmmm Seems there aren't any HUH.Even the teenagers get S>C>R>E>W>E>D>

                            job prospects bleakest in decades
                            Immigrants, seniors often vying for same positions
                            *****' job prospects bleakest in decades
                            Immigrants, seniors often vying for same positions
                            By Dana Bartholomew
                            Staff Writer

                            Thursday, March 25, 2004 -
                            Seventeen-year-old Alfredo Martinez has pounded the pavement for two months looking for work -- at malls, hamburger stands, any place that will pay him minimum wage.
                            But all he hears from prospective employers is: "There's no jobs available now."
                            "I want a job already. I need money," said Martinez, a Canoga Park High School senior. "I gotta buy a car; I need money for college."
                            He has tough competition. Teenagers face the roughest job market in 56 years as a lackluster economy forces adults and an influx of immigrants to snag low-rung jobs normally filled by high school students, according to a landmark study.
                            The problem is particularly acute in California, where jobs for ***** fall short of the national average, researchers say.
                            "Horrible, horrible," said Andrew Sum, director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston and the author of the study. "The depth of the job crisis among ***** is unprecedented -- it's the lowest since any time since 1948."
                            His study, "Still Young, Restless and Jobless: The Growing Employment Malaise Among U.S. ***** and Young Adults," paints a bleak prospect for legions of ***** seeking summer or year-round work.
                            Over the past three years, the average number of employed ***** dropped by 1.3 million a year, or 18 percent, while the same population grew by 5 percent.
                            Last year, the ratio of employed ***** to population fell to 36.8 percent -- the lowest since the end of World War II -- with male ***** suffering the brunt of unemployment.
                            Among young women, work prospects were the lowest since 1971; for white *****, the worst since 1964. For black *****, whose employed-teen-to-population ratio was 22 percent, it's the worst since 1983.
                            Sum attributed the decline to few new jobs, more older Americans seeking work, a surge of immigrants looking for unskilled positions and college grads settling for jobs normally filled by *****.
                            Across the nation, 2.5 million immigrants landed jobs between 2000 and 2003, while the U.S. economy has ditched 2.3 million jobs since 2001.
                            "Kids have always had a hard time in California, particularly in the big cities," Sum said. "The higher the share of immigrants in the work force, the lower the share of jobs for *****."
                            Many job seekers in Los Angeles schools and teen service agencies agree. They also maintain that jobs for ***** mean higher grades, fewer pregnancies, a greater chance at high school graduation and a better shot at getting jobs as young adults.
                            "It's nuts," said Terri Darr, adviser for the First Break program, which conducts job development and placement for the Los Angeles Unified School District. "We have such a big immigrant issue here, it's tough."
                            Darr, who places a thousand kids in jobs at Six Flags California's Magic Mountain in Santa Clarita every year, said many employers such as ready-to-wear retailers will now hire only adults.
                            Best bets for ***** are still jobs flipping burgers, loading groceries, or working for city parks or summer camps as lifeguards and counselors.
                            Universal Studios has always hired kids during the summer, Darr said. Washington Mutual bank, Kaiser Permanente hospitals and the Los Angeles Conservation Corps are also strong teen employers.
                            Job boards, however, remain fairly bare at some San Fernando Valley high schools.
                            "I've had a couple of jobs come through, but my board is not as plentiful as it used to be," said Judy Giller, counselor at a career center at Van Nuys High School.
                            "I search for the jobs on First Break -- there are none," added a woman at a career center at Granada Hills Charter High School who asked to remain anonymous.
                            "I looked around Granada Hills and there are none -- it's the first time in five years that I have never seen any jobs available. ... So, yeah, it's a tough market right now."
                            Sal Arrona, program coordinator for the Constitution Rights Foundation in Los Angeles, which provides internship opportunities for *****, agreed.
                            "A lot of companies, as the report indicated, are not hiring students," he said.
                            Ellen Brown, a job counselor at Grant High School, disagrees. She said she hasn't noticed a downturn, that her kids find work on a regular basis.
                            Marshall Wexler, an area developer and a franchise owner of Cousins Subs, with locations in Van Nuys and Encino, said he's got openings for ***** in Santa Clarita and Chatsworth in the next two weeks.
                            "We're constantly on the lookout and would love to have more high school kids. The ones that want to work really want to work. Some actually want a future in the food business.
                            "When we find high school kids who want to work, it's great. We had one start in high school, finish and now he's full time."
                            Officials at Disney, which normally hires ***** at its Disneyland theme park and Universal Studios, said personnel representatives were not available for comment late Thursday.
                            Bobby Arias, president of Communities in Schools, a North Hills group that finds jobs for former gang members, said it's vital that jobs open up for ***** soon.
                            "On too many occasions, business and the private sector give up on kids," he said. "We need to impress on society that, if one of these kids fails, we fail.
                            "How can you develop dreams if you've never been exposed to the world of work? If all you see is kids slinging dope on the corner all day, how do you develop a work ethic?"
                            Nokia Brown, 18, a student at Owensmouth Continuation School, said he's lucky to be working at McDonald's. "It's not great, but it's a job," he said.
                            But Ignacio Perez, 17, of Canoga Park, isn't so lucky.
                            "I've been looking for a long time, whatever, almost a year," said the teen outside Canoga High School, who's checked the malls, supermarkets, any stores with a "Help Wanted" sign.
                            "They say, 'I'll call you,' and never call

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              [copy-paste from www.visalaw.com]

                              Cannon Targets Anti-Immigration Groups

                              Utah Congressman Chris Cannon charged that some of the groups that are leading the fight against the legalization of undocumented workers are fronting for hate groups as well as groups with "anti-life" agendas such as free on-demand abortion, sterilization of low-income people, and euthanasia of the elderly.



                              Cannon is one of the sponsors of a bill to give farm workers who are in the country illegally an opportunity to become permanent legal residents. Last week he spurred the debate with accusations at a House Judiciary subcommittee hearing.



                              After all other members of the panel had left to vote on the floor, Cannon questioned anti-immigration witnesses for 40 minutes. The interrogation ended when the subcommittee chairman came back to the room and ordered Cannon to end the questioning.



                              Cannon questioned organizations, such as the Center for Immigration Studies, NumbersUSA, and the Diversity Alliance for a Sustainable America about their ties to John Tanton, former Zero Population Growth president and founder of the Federation of American Immigration Reform. Representatives acknowledged that their groups were involved with the network of nonprofits founded by Tanton although denying the characterization offered by Cannon. Also, the groups stated that Tanton did not control them, nor do they share in any of the purported extreme beliefs.



                              Cannon read off newspaper articles about Tanton, including one from the The Wall Street Journal, which stated that Tanton has received more than $1.5 million from the Pioneer Fund, a white supremacist organization promoting racial purity through eugenics, a theory of selective human breeding espoused by Adolf Hitler's Nazi regime. He also stated that Tanton received money from groups that finance research to prove the genetic superiority of the white race and fund abortion promotion.



                              Members of the targeted groups argued that the lower-income, uneducated U.S. citizens would suffer the most from the plan to legalize large groups of immigrants. They believe it would drive down wages and allow employers to find even more employees overseas.



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