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do debts or bankruptcy affect green card immigration?

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  • #16
    ok but are'nt you like suppose to take the documents they ask for ... lets say if they don't ask for the tax documents for the interview .. u still should take them ?

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    • #17
      thank you for clarifying this. so as long as one has come to an arrangement about debts, it is possible to immigrate as a permanent resident?

      it sounds from what you say that even if one is declared bankrupt in the country one is immigrating from, that is okay? would one to wait a certain time after the bankruptcy has been done, before immigrating?

      is the relevant form available to download, to see the exact phrasing? it'd be nice to see what exactly the requirement is, when it comes to financial/debt matters.

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      • #18
        I don't know where Houston gets this information! Inadmissibility on the basis of criminal activity is discussed in the Foreign Affairs Manual from the Department of State. Mind you, you'd have to have been charged in order for that to come into play and it would have to be a criminal charge.
        The above is simply an opinion. Your mileage may vary. For immigration issues, please consult an immigration attorney.

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        • #19
          I don't understand why the conversation got so diverted. The OP ask whether having a debt or declaring bankruptcy in country of origin is a hindrance from obtaining GC. Personally, I think the answer is a resounding NO. What does got to do with tax return or IRS??

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          • #20
            Bankruptcy and being in debt is not a crime. We no longer put people in jail for that. When you come here you are not asked for your previous financial/credit reports. (Or SS#) You do not have to even say you had a job in your previous country. A bank may ask if you are from a coutnry where your previous credit information is recognized but you don't have to provide it. Banks here want information on whether you are in the country with the correct documentation - if they even ask for that.

            As for the question about not having American tax information actually requested YES - do bring your tax filings - I was asked for mine when I was in the meeting - I was not told beforehand that my taxes would be requested. Always better to be safe than sorry.

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            • #21
              Again Dragonlady,

              If someone has more than one SS# then that means they have more than one idenity and yes that is a concern to an officer at adjustment.

              If you take the time to look at the new bankruptcy law you will notice that debts for those making above the median area wage are only extinguished through a judge. So while they may not put you in jail for being debt THEY WILL make you go before a judge now and HE will decide when your debts are behind you.

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              • #22
                Please re read the original question. Debts FROM A DIFFERENT COUNTRY ARE NOT AMERICAN DEBTS. You never have to claim them here.

                AGAIN: If you have permission to work in your home country and the US as well - you DO NOT have more than one identity. If you are a PR here, you can still work in your home country. If you have dual citizenship you can also work in both countries. This does not give you more than one identity. If you have dual citizenship you can also carry two passports - this does not mean you have more than one identity. If my Green Card is in my maiden name and I use my married name in the community - it is legal and you do not have more than one identity. If you have a university degree your name does not change on the degree if you marry or take back your maiden name. This does not mean you have more than one identity.

                Going before a judge means very little - it does not necessarily give you a criminal record. Some people go through a divorce in front of a judge, some people take oaths in front of a judge, some people contest traffic tickets in front of a judge. Some of us go to lunch with the judge and some of us are married to a judge.

                Bankruptcy also means very little any more. Lots of businesses claim bankruptcy and are back in business the next day under a different name - Thousands of people claim bankrupty in this country and lose nothing.

                The term Social Security (SS) is used in many countries and if another country uses a different name for cards that give you permission to work - well other members seem to be able to make the transfer to the possiblity that different names may be used for the same thing.

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                • #23
                  What other countries use the term "social security number" or even ss#.

                  Just because you assume other people know what you mean does not mean they do.

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                  • #24
                    Social Security Social SecurityInsurance
                    Algeria
                    Australia
                    Antigua/Barbuda
                    Austria
                    Argentina
                    Bahamas
                    Armenia
                    Barbados
                    Belize
                    Bahrain
                    Belgium
                    Bolivia
                    Botswana
                    Canada
                    Bulgaria
                    Cote de Ivoire
                    Burkina Faso
                    Finland
                    Chile
                    Hong Kong
                    China
                    Hungary
                    Columbia
                    Italy
                    Costa Rica
                    Latvia
                    Czech Republic
                    Lithuania
                    Denmark
                    Madgascar
                    Dominican Republic
                    Nigeria
                    Ecuador
                    Oman
                    El Salvador
                    Paraguay
                    France
                    Peru
                    Germany
                    Poland
                    Greece
                    Santa Lucia
                    Guatemala
                    Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
                    Guyana
                    Honduras
                    Saudi Arabia
                    Indonesia
                    Senegal
                    Japan
                    Slvakia
                    Jordan
                    Slovenia
                    Kuwait
                    Sweden
                    Luxembourg
                    Turkey
                    Macau
                    United Kingdom
                    Mauritius
                    Uruguay
                    Mexico
                    Morocco
                    Netherlands
                    Nicaragua
                    Norway
                    Philippines
                    Saint Christopher and Nevis
                    Sierra Leone
                    Switzerland
                    Tunisia
                    Turkey
                    Uganda
                    Unite Arab Emirates
                    United Kingdom
                    Venezuela
                    Zimbabwe

                    The United States has bilateral Social Security agreements with 21 countries. The agreements improve benefit protection for workers who have divided their careers between the United States and another country. They also eliminate dual Social Security coverage and taxes for multinational companies and expatriate workers.

                    For information about other countries' Social Security programs, check the latest version of "Social Security Programs throughout the World".

                    We've also provided Links to Social Security Web Pages of other Countries and International Organizations.

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                    • #25
                      Well, I can tell that the citizens in several countries in dragonlady's list won't have a clue what the term Social Security Number refers to.

                      I think its pretty clear that USCIS won't consider debt in one's country of origin as a hindrance in the process of obtaining LPR.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Annual Statistical Report on the Social Security Disability Insurance Program
                        (released )

                        Social Security Programs Throughout the World

                        This publication highlights the principal features of social security programs in more than 170 countries: old-age, survivors, and disability; sickness and maternity; work injury; unemployment; and family allowances. A set of tables in each volume provides information for each country on the types of social security programs, types of mandatory systems for retirement income, contribution rates, and demographic and other statistics related to social security.

                        Beginning with the March 2002 edition, SSPTW now appears in four volumes published on a rolling basis every 6 months. Each volume focuses on a specific region of the world: Europe, Asia and the Pacific, Africa, and the Americas.

                        To view the most recent information for each region, please select the appropriate link below:

                        * Europe
                        * Asia and the Pacific
                        * Africa
                        * The Americas

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                        • #27
                          No one is debating if other countrys have public retirement systems. The ONLY point of debate is regarding clairity. Do these other countries that issue numbers to their citizens call the numbers SS numbers?

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                          • #28
                            Bankruptcy and debt are not crimes, fraud is. Entering into an agreement and willingly failing to comply is fraud. It could even be an aggravated felony depending on the amount of the damages.

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                            • #29
                              Key word: willingly/with intent. Not being able to pay your bills and filing bankrupty does not show a willingness to defraud anyone. If you run a scam and take money from people by lying about your product or returns - it is fraud. The airlines are filing bankruptcy but this is not fraud - even though millions of dollars are involved. Fred Smith buys a house and a car and has some credit cards and then loses his job and cannot pay for the items he bought- this is not fraud. Enron lying to peoplel about investments is fraud. A politician taking money under the table or not claiming political contributions may be fraud. Insider trading may be fraud. Stealing from your employer is embezzelment. Fraud is a deliberate deception practiced so as to secure unfair or unlawful gain. Many people buy things - and pay for them for while and then through no fault of their own are not able to continue to pay for the items. This is not deliberate deception. It is unfortunate circumstances. Look at all the debt consolidation companys that thrive on these situations. It is not up to us to decide if something is fraudulent. We do not have all the information. And if this person committed fraud, he would probably not be posting on this board - he would be paying whatever the price is in his/her own country.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Fred Smith would have a hard time facing some creditors if he bought the items knowing he was not able to pay. Intent to defraud is present when a person knows he's not able to pay and knowingly accepts the obligation without informing of his situation to the creditor. However, damages have to be proven to establish fraud.

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