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  • Illegals now getting arrested by police

    About freakin' time! Over a THOUSAND are jumping over every day. This is an invasion and we need to step-up the enforcement before our border becomes a f'n joke.

    -= nav =-

    Migrants now face capture by police

    Growing trend creates concern
    By Rachel L. Swarns
    THE NEW YORK TIMES

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. - Every workday morning, before the sun creeps above the trees, State Trooper Anthony Birmingham goes on patrol with his new law enforcement bible - the "Immigration Law Handbook" - in his Ford Crown Victoria.

    For 7 1/2 years, he has watched sleepy state roads and bustling highways for speeding commuters and careless drivers. Now he also serves as a foot soldier in the domestic war on terrorism, one of a small but growing number of police officers empowered by the Department of Homeland Security to arrest and detain illegal immigrants.

    Over the past six months, Birmingham and 20 others on the state force have arrested 106 illegal immigrants, including a Mexican man driving 90 mph and a Mexican mother of two who presented invalid documents while applying for a driver's license.

    In the past, such immigrants were often given traffic tickets or warnings and sent on their way. These days, they might be arrested by the state police - even if they have not broken a state law - and handed over to federal authorities for deportation.

    "Before, the only thing we could do was issue a traffic citation and let them go," Birmingham said as he cruised along State Road 9. "It's different now."

    Alabama is the epicenter of a widening effort by the Department of Homeland Security to encourage states and localities to help enforce immigration laws in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

    Colorado, Idaho and Virginia are considering following the examples of Alabama, which began its partnership with the Department of Homeland Security in September, and Florida, which signed an agreement with federal officials in 2002.

    In Los Angeles County, the Sheriff's Office is close to an agreement to allow booking officers to identify illegal immigrants in county jails for deportation.

    These and other efforts to involve law enforcement agencies in immigration matters have stirred a furor among both advocates for immigrants and police chiefs in Boston, Houston, several communities in California and around the country.

    In Southern Arizona, officials at many police agencies have expressed concern in past years about their officers acting as immigration agents.

    Opponents warn that these arrangements may make immigrants wary of cooperating with the police or reporting crime, and could lead to racial profiling at the expense even of people in the country legally.

    Many immigration violations - like overstaying a visa - are civil infractions, not criminal offenses typically handled by the police. At least 30 jurisdictions bar their officers from enforcing immigration laws, congressional researchers say, but others are joining in.

    Homeland Security officials, understaffed and eager for assistance, are making it easier for police officers to help by adding to an FBI crime database the names of immigrants who have evaded deportation orders, including 112,000 with criminal records and 28,000 without them. The database is used by 80,000 agencies to track felons and fugitives.

    In December, immigrants' lawyers sued to stop the expansion of the database, saying the police should not enforce civil immigration laws outside of formal partnerships like those in Alabama and Florida.

    Officials also are improving the efficiency of the Department of Homeland Security's Law Enforcement Support Center, which holds more detailed immigration records than the FBI database. In March, police officers who called the center helped federal agents locate more than 2,000 illegal immigrants, officials say.

    Some Republicans in Congress say such efforts need to be stepped up. About 5,500 agents are assigned to immigration enforcement, but more than 8 million immigrants are estimated to be in the country illegally.

    More than 100 members of Congress are now backing legislation that would require the nation's 600,000 state and local police officers to help enforce the immigration laws.

    Homeland Security officials say the cooperative efforts in place, while small in scope, represent an unusual degree of collaboration between federal officials and local police officials, who were overwhelmingly reluctant to assume any federal immigration enforcement duties before the Sept. 11 attacks.

    "I see the future of this being very positive," said Michael J. Garcia, the Homeland Security undersecretary for the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which promotes cooperation with local police departments on a range of issues.

    Garcia emphasized that states were not required to participate in the formal partnerships and noted that local police officers involved in such arrangements receive several weeks of intensive training and strict warnings against racial profiling.

    State officials in Alabama, as well as immigrant advocates here, say so far there have been no complaints from immigrants about the federal-local partnership.

    But officials from the American Civil Liberties Union and the Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama, who oppose the initiative, say they fear that some immigrants have already been deported and that others have been driven underground.

    In June, the groups hope to start posting fliers to urge immigrants to tell them about their experiences with police. In the meantime, advocates are telling clients not to attract attention on state roads by speeding or driving cars with broken taillights or missing license plates.

  • #2
    About freakin' time! Over a THOUSAND are jumping over every day. This is an invasion and we need to step-up the enforcement before our border becomes a f'n joke.

    -= nav =-

    Migrants now face capture by police

    Growing trend creates concern
    By Rachel L. Swarns
    THE NEW YORK TIMES

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. - Every workday morning, before the sun creeps above the trees, State Trooper Anthony Birmingham goes on patrol with his new law enforcement bible - the "Immigration Law Handbook" - in his Ford Crown Victoria.

    For 7 1/2 years, he has watched sleepy state roads and bustling highways for speeding commuters and careless drivers. Now he also serves as a foot soldier in the domestic war on terrorism, one of a small but growing number of police officers empowered by the Department of Homeland Security to arrest and detain illegal immigrants.

    Over the past six months, Birmingham and 20 others on the state force have arrested 106 illegal immigrants, including a Mexican man driving 90 mph and a Mexican mother of two who presented invalid documents while applying for a driver's license.

    In the past, such immigrants were often given traffic tickets or warnings and sent on their way. These days, they might be arrested by the state police - even if they have not broken a state law - and handed over to federal authorities for deportation.

    "Before, the only thing we could do was issue a traffic citation and let them go," Birmingham said as he cruised along State Road 9. "It's different now."

    Alabama is the epicenter of a widening effort by the Department of Homeland Security to encourage states and localities to help enforce immigration laws in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

    Colorado, Idaho and Virginia are considering following the examples of Alabama, which began its partnership with the Department of Homeland Security in September, and Florida, which signed an agreement with federal officials in 2002.

    In Los Angeles County, the Sheriff's Office is close to an agreement to allow booking officers to identify illegal immigrants in county jails for deportation.

    These and other efforts to involve law enforcement agencies in immigration matters have stirred a furor among both advocates for immigrants and police chiefs in Boston, Houston, several communities in California and around the country.

    In Southern Arizona, officials at many police agencies have expressed concern in past years about their officers acting as immigration agents.

    Opponents warn that these arrangements may make immigrants wary of cooperating with the police or reporting crime, and could lead to racial profiling at the expense even of people in the country legally.

    Many immigration violations - like overstaying a visa - are civil infractions, not criminal offenses typically handled by the police. At least 30 jurisdictions bar their officers from enforcing immigration laws, congressional researchers say, but others are joining in.

    Homeland Security officials, understaffed and eager for assistance, are making it easier for police officers to help by adding to an FBI crime database the names of immigrants who have evaded deportation orders, including 112,000 with criminal records and 28,000 without them. The database is used by 80,000 agencies to track felons and fugitives.

    In December, immigrants' lawyers sued to stop the expansion of the database, saying the police should not enforce civil immigration laws outside of formal partnerships like those in Alabama and Florida.

    Officials also are improving the efficiency of the Department of Homeland Security's Law Enforcement Support Center, which holds more detailed immigration records than the FBI database. In March, police officers who called the center helped federal agents locate more than 2,000 illegal immigrants, officials say.

    Some Republicans in Congress say such efforts need to be stepped up. About 5,500 agents are assigned to immigration enforcement, but more than 8 million immigrants are estimated to be in the country illegally.

    More than 100 members of Congress are now backing legislation that would require the nation's 600,000 state and local police officers to help enforce the immigration laws.

    Homeland Security officials say the cooperative efforts in place, while small in scope, represent an unusual degree of collaboration between federal officials and local police officials, who were overwhelmingly reluctant to assume any federal immigration enforcement duties before the Sept. 11 attacks.

    "I see the future of this being very positive," said Michael J. Garcia, the Homeland Security undersecretary for the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which promotes cooperation with local police departments on a range of issues.

    Garcia emphasized that states were not required to participate in the formal partnerships and noted that local police officers involved in such arrangements receive several weeks of intensive training and strict warnings against racial profiling.

    State officials in Alabama, as well as immigrant advocates here, say so far there have been no complaints from immigrants about the federal-local partnership.

    But officials from the American Civil Liberties Union and the Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama, who oppose the initiative, say they fear that some immigrants have already been deported and that others have been driven underground.

    In June, the groups hope to start posting fliers to urge immigrants to tell them about their experiences with police. In the meantime, advocates are telling clients not to attract attention on state roads by speeding or driving cars with broken taillights or missing license plates.

    Comment


    • #3
      About time

      Now, the problem is, after rounding em up, what will you do with them? I hope they have some way to gather data of the illegals while they await bail/deportation.

      Comment


      • #4
        Like us Americans have been saying for EONS...:

        Concentrate on LOCKING UP the border, and deporting people by the boatloads FIRST.

        Once we deport the criminals, the baby-droppers, border jumpers and drug smugglers and keep 'em out THEN we can concentrate on an amnestsy for the ones who've been here as kids, never got into trouble, etc. Easier to give and process amnesty case by case for 2 million then 20 MILLION!

        -= nav =-

        Comment


        • #5
          Yay!
          Sweet Madame Belu

          Comment


          • #6
            What about those unfortunate people that had no choice but to risk their life crossing the border because in their home country jobs pay 5 dollars a day? people who live an honest life, work hard, pay taxes?

            You take the benefits of living in this wonderful country for granted, but I dont see you fighting against poverty, corruption, terrorism, hate...

            I suggest you cowboy the f*ck up and join your countrymen overseas fighting for freedom. That is the first thing I'm going to do when I get my green card.

            Comment


            • #7
              >that had no choice but to risk their life >crossing the border because in their home >country jobs pay 5 dollars a day?

              Yeah. That represents 3 BILLION people in the world. And you KNOW WHAT HAPPENS if we invite 3 billion people int he world?

              WE'RE F'NG MAKING 5 DOLLARS AN HOUR!

              >people who live an honest life, work hard, pay >taxes?

              But can't seem to want to immigrate here LEGALLY like othres have?

              Tell ya what. You make your home open to 500 somalians who i'll bring over. And it's YOUR job to house, feed them, and make sure they make at LEAST $10/hr.

              You make the first move.

              -= nav =-

              Comment


              • #8
                moondin, how old are you? 11, 12?

                Don't give me that bullsh*t, seriously.

                Put yourself in their shoes. What would you do? Do you know how freakin' hard it is to immigrate legally to this country, or any other first world country for that matter. Immigration laws in thins country push people to do so by other means.

                And don't tell me you have always been a law-abiding citizen. Think about it... give honest, hard-working immigrants a break.

                Comment


                • #9
                  They should just shoot them. It costs a lot of money to incarcerate and deport these people. I used to think that only citizens had constitutional rights but it seems that these people have as many rights as we do.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I wouldn't mind these people but they hate America so much and they insist on coming here.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      what would I do?

                      Oh i don't know. File I-485, I-130, Fingerprint check, AP, etc. etc.

                      Oh i forgot. Illegals don't care about those fancy terms. They want to make their own shortcut.

                      -= nav =-

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by alex-p:
                        moondin, how old are you? 11, 12?

                        Don't give me that bullsh*t, seriously.

                        Put yourself in their shoes. What would you do? Do you know how freakin' hard it is to immigrate legally to this country, or any other first world country for that matter. Immigration laws in thins country push people to do so by other means.
                        Immigration is a priviledge sir, not a right.
                        And yes, Americans should be thankful to have been born in this country. But there's millions of ppl that survive and build their families in other countries as well without having to go here. If you want to give all the poor people a break, why not just open the southern border and let millions of ppl enter? Want to see how long before this country goes bankrupt?
                        And yes, life isn't FAIR.

                        Immigration is not a problem for USA, illegal immigration is.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "But there's millions of ppl that survive and build their families in other countries as well without having to go here"

                          So I guess your family was doing really good in their country of origin and that is why they decided to come to this country.
                          (Nevermind that comment if you are a Native American).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Not necessarily. But it tells of your character if you decided to break the law for the pursuit of the allmighty dollars.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Do you want to know who breaks the law for the pursuit of the ALLMIGHTY dollars? The head honchos for Enron, MCI, etc... Not the immigrant making $5.50/hr to feed their family.

                              Comment

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