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  • Unique Situation

    I'm an American citizen who in 1976 married a Greek here in the U.S. We had two children both born in Connecticut, my daughter in 1977 and my son in 1979. In 1982 we moved as a family to Greece where i remained until 1998 at which time i returned to the U.S. with my two younger daughters, both U.S. Citizens Born Abroad. My older daughter had married at that time (with a Greek) and remained in Greece and eventually had 2 sons with him. In 2004 she returned here to the United States with her sons, however they did not receive United States citizenship through her becasue she was not in the U.S. for the required time after her 16th birthday. The boys have been here since that time though their visas have expired. we have attempted to find out how to make them American citizens, however its impossible for us to be able to afford the fees that we were quoted. Does anyone have any idea on what we can do about this situation? we're so worried about the boys having to leave the country, they literally have no one to go to, and we are at our witts end! Can someone PLEASE help us?

  • #2
    I'm an American citizen who in 1976 married a Greek here in the U.S. We had two children both born in Connecticut, my daughter in 1977 and my son in 1979. In 1982 we moved as a family to Greece where i remained until 1998 at which time i returned to the U.S. with my two younger daughters, both U.S. Citizens Born Abroad. My older daughter had married at that time (with a Greek) and remained in Greece and eventually had 2 sons with him. In 2004 she returned here to the United States with her sons, however they did not receive United States citizenship through her becasue she was not in the U.S. for the required time after her 16th birthday. The boys have been here since that time though their visas have expired. we have attempted to find out how to make them American citizens, however its impossible for us to be able to afford the fees that we were quoted. Does anyone have any idea on what we can do about this situation? we're so worried about the boys having to leave the country, they literally have no one to go to, and we are at our witts end! Can someone PLEASE help us?

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    • #3
      Have you gotten different opinions from different lawyers? I'm not sure where you're located, but many lawyers offer free consultations and they would probably let you make payments to them. They might also tell you that you might qualify for a fee waiver from USCIS if your finacial situation is really bad. This is probably something that you dont want to hear, but USCIS is going to increase their fees so you might want to move quick on this. Good Luck!

      Comment


      • #4
        Hello,

        How I understand this paragraph it is possible to get US citizenship for a child born abroad even if the US parent did not live in the US for the required time.
        Good luck



        1. If I am a U.S. citizen, is my child a U. S. citizen?

        A child who is born in the United States, or born abroad to a U.S. citizen(s) who lived in (or came to) the United States for a period of time prior to the child's birth, is considered a U.S. citizen at birth.

        A child who is:
        o born to a U.S. citizen who did not live in (or come to) the United States for a period of time prior to the child's birth, or
        o born to one U.S. citizen parent and one alien parent or two alien parents who naturalize after the child's birth, or
        o adopted and is permanently residing in the United States can become a U.S. citizen by action of law on the date on which all of the following requirements have been met:
        § The child was lawfully admitted for permanent residence*; and
        § Either parent was a United States citizen by birth or naturalization**; and
        § The child was still under 18 years of age; and
        § The child was not married; and
        § The child was the parent's legitimate child or was legitimated by the parent before the child's 16th birthday (Stepchildren or children born out of wedlock who were not legitimated before their 16th birthday do not derive United States citizenship through their parents.); and
        § If adopted, the child met the requirements of section 101(b)(1)(E) or (F) and has had a full and final adoption; and
        § The child was residing in the United States in the legal custody of the U.S. citizen parent (this includes joint custody); and
        § The child was residing in the United States in the physical custody of the U.S. citizen parent.
        If you and your child meet all of these requirements, you may obtain a U.S. passport for the child as evidence of citizenship. If the child needs further evidence of citizenship, you may submit an "Application for Certificate of Citizenship" (Form N-600) to U.S. of Citizenship and Immigration Services (formerly known as the INS) to obtain a Certificate of Citizenship. If the child meets the requirements of Section 101(b)(1) of the Immigration and Nationality Act as an adopted child, you may submit an 'Application for Certificate of Citizenship on Behalf of an Adopted Child' (Form N-643). (Note: a child who meets these requirements before his or her 18th birthday may obtain a passport or Certificate of Citizenship at any time, even after he or she turns 18.)

        *NOTE: Children who immigrate in the 'IR-3' or 'IR-4' categories must have had an immigrant petition filed on their behalf before their 16th birthday; see answers to Question 25 below. All adoptions for any other type of immigration benefit, including naturalization,

        Comment


        • #5
          <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by brahamamamma:
          afford the fees that we were quoted. Does anyone have any idea on what we can do about this situation? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
          Are you talking about the lawyer fees or fees for the forms?

          The process for the boys to become US citizens shouldn't be too complicated. The first requirement " § The child was lawfully admitted for permanent residence*; " is what's missing.

          It means the boys have to become Permanent residents first. Your daughter should file I-130 and I-485 for each of them. Since they are minor, visa overstay is not counted. Once they are granted residency, your daughter "may obtain a U.S. passport for the child as evidence of citizenship"

          Run this scenario by some lawyer during the free consultations.

          Comment


          • #6
            Global B2B Platform

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