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    This is a "what-if" type of question please don't comment back saying why would they do that.... if you know the answer it would be appreciated.....

    I have a question, do you have to show your identification when you turn in your I-94 when you leave the US? What I mean is like if you have minor children could the parents turn in thier I-94 for them if the children are not physically present with thier parents when they turn the I-94 in?
    -thanks

  • #2
    This is a "what-if" type of question please don't comment back saying why would they do that.... if you know the answer it would be appreciated.....

    I have a question, do you have to show your identification when you turn in your I-94 when you leave the US? What I mean is like if you have minor children could the parents turn in thier I-94 for them if the children are not physically present with thier parents when they turn the I-94 in?
    -thanks

    Comment


    • #3
      Here are the posts from one of your original threads. Did you not receive the answer you needed in this thread? I believe you had some pretty good advice here. Good luck.


      needing answers
      Regular Member
      Posted December 19, 2007 04:25 PM
      Ok.... my husband of less than a month and I are needing some questions answered.
      Here's our situation:
      I am an eighteen year-old U.S. Citizen who was just recently married on December 10 to the love of my life, who is also eighteen. He came here from Mexico at the age of twelve on a Visitor B1/B2 Visa/Border Crossing Card. We met around age fourteen in high school (we graduated Advanced Diploma last May) and have been together since. We are now both Nursing students in college and we both come from Christian homes. His Visa expired in 2005. So, he's overstayed his Visa almost 2.5 years already. He came on an airplane and we cannot find his I-94. We are pretty sure his dad turned it in when his dad left the country, although my husband stayed. We live at my parents' house right now while we're going through college, until we get a house of our own (and nursing jobs). I am taking an overload of college classes, so I clean house, do laundry, etc, for my parents and they pay me. My husband has no job because he has no work permit. My dad is supporting us fully though, (thank the good lord) until we graduate.

      Here is the documentation we have:
      His expired B1/B2 Visa/ Border Crossing Card; My U.S. Birth Certificate; Our marriage certificate; His passport; His Mexico Birth Certificate and a notarized English translated copy of it.

      We've done a TON of research on everything and we understand the long road ahead of us, and the price that goes along with it. You were recommended to me by Micheal Boyle, (a lawyer I emailed in search of someone in Alabama to contact). If you don't mind, I have a few questions for you......

      1. How does our situation look?
      2. What are our options?,... Briefly speaking.
      3. How much lawyer services cost?
      4. We must wait five months after our marriage to file for immigranmt relative, work permit, change of status to permenant resident, etc; correct?
      5. He has no I-94 because his dad turned it in when he left and my husband stayed here in high school. And will they consider him "uninspected" (because he was inspected when entering through Bronsville, TX, they examined his crossing card; and at the airport). Or will they think he did leave and he came back illegaly? Or can he prove that he was here the whole time by his high school records?
      6. What are ways to prove our marriage is legitamate seeing we don't own anything together yet (don't have papers on anything except our bank account together) and probably won't for another 2 1/2 years. (because of living with my parents)

      Sorry for all the questions....I would just like some stress relieved (=

      -thanks
      Posts: 20 | Registered: December 19, 2007

      4now
      Power Member

      Posted December 19, 2007 09:27 PM Hide Post
      Hello and welcome to ILW



      Your husband is not considered uninspected. this term is used for people that sneak into the country and they cannot adjust their status by marriage on usa soil.

      Your husband had a valid visa when he entered. That is considered inspected.

      if you are good at reading forms and following instruction, you can complete the forms yourself and save some money. forms are online at uscis.gov or visit visajourney.com and there are loads and tons of help there to guide u step by step. Marriage package are forms:

      i-130, i-485, i-765, i-864, i-693 medical, (2)325a biological info for both of you


      One of your parents will have to be a co sponser if you do not make the required money to sponser your husband.

      Good Luck
      Posts: 2396 | Registered: September 27, 2003

      Ignored post by 4now posted December 19, 2007 09:27 PM Show Post

      iperson
      Power Member
      Posted December 20, 2007 02:41 AM Hide Post
      Hey 4now,
      Thanks for using the correct terminology.
      Kewl..
      Posts: 1509 | Registered: May 18, 2006

      Ignored post by iperson posted December 20, 2007 02:41 AM Show Post

      needing answers
      Regular Member
      Posted December 20, 2007 11:25 AM Hide Post
      Thanks 4now! So what should we put on the forms where it asks for the I-94 #?

      -thanks
      Posts: 20 | Registered: December 19, 2007

      Ignored post by needing answers posted December 20, 2007 11:25 AM Show Post

      davdah
      Power Member

      Posted December 20, 2007 11:32 AM Hide Post
      You can get a copy of the I-94. Use form I-102
      Who told you you have to wait for five months to file the AOS? I don't think that is correct.

      Anything that shows you are in a real marriage will help. Pictures together, ring receipts, hotel receipts, letters from family/friends.


      __________________________________________________________________
      I may not like what you say but I've defended your right to say it.
      Posts: 1450 | Location: San diego, CA & San Antonio TX | Registered: June 08, 2007

      Ignored post by davdah posted December 20, 2007 11:32 AM Show Post

      needing answers
      Regular Member
      Posted December 20, 2007 11:50 AM Hide Post
      even though his dad turned it back my husband's I-94 when he left? And my husband stayed in High school!! He was only like 13/14 at the time when it was turned back in! So will they think he left and came back illegaly? We have his school records to prove he was here the whole time! How do we go about that??? THANK YOU AND GOD BLESS YOU!!!

      -thanks

      -thanks
      Posts: 20 | Registered: December 19, 2007

      Ignored post by needing answers posted December 20, 2007 11:50 AM Show Post

      davdah
      Power Member

      Posted December 20, 2007 12:57 PM Hide Post
      Are you absolutely sure his dad turned it in? I doubt it since the port of exit would have asked 'Where is the person for this I-94?' More than likely it was tossed and never turned in at all. Hopefully it wasn't. If it was turned in then it will be assumed he re-entered EWI. School records etc. won't help since there is no way to prove he did not leave and come back. If that assumption is made during the AOS process then it will change the dynamics of your case greatly. You should see an immigration attorney. You could be separated for up to 10 years if this goes bad.


      __________________________________________________________________
      I may not like what you say but I've defended your right to say it.
      Posts: 1450 | Location: San diego, CA & San Antonio TX | Registered: June 08, 2007

      Ignored post by davdah posted December 20, 2007 12:57 PM Show Post

      4now
      Power Member

      Posted December 20, 2007 06:44 PM Hide Post
      quote:
      Originally posted by needing answers:
      Thanks 4now! So what should we put on the forms where it asks for the I-94 #?



      Yes request a copy of I-194 as Davdah explained.


      But wait.. your father could not have turned in his i-94 for him. Oh Im sorry... you are going to have a hard time with this if it was turned in .. They just cant be turned in you know.. Are you sure husband didnt go back to his country and return EWI (sneaked into usa)?

      Ask him. Uscis is not going to buy any other excuse.

      This is fatal part of lie or scheme and will backfire if so. or just plain ignorance .. Why in the world would if he was planning an overstay to go to school... would he return to country and sneak back in.?????????


      overstay of visa is forgiven by marriage to usc.

      EWI "sneaked in" is another story. and now it will appear as deliberate fraud in addition.. This will not be an easy a
      adjustment of status .


      Now.. you should come clean here with the facts if you need help from us.

      After re-reading your response about
      'school records" as evidence... you are forgetting that he would have to attended 365 days without missing 1 day.. and you know that is impossible since school is not in session 365 days a year.


      get Real story please from him
      Posts: 2396 | Registered: September 27, 2003

      Ignored post by 4now posted December 20, 2007 06:44 PM Show Post

      needing answers
      Regular Member
      Posted December 20, 2007 09:50 PM Hide Post
      That is seriously the real story we got from his dad!!!!!!!!!!!!

      -thanks
      Posts: 20 | Registered: December 19, 2007

      Ignored post by needing answers posted December 20, 2007 09:50 PM Show Post

      davdah
      Power Member

      Posted December 20, 2007 11:10 PM Hide Post
      The issue of the I-94 is still questionable. They would not have accepted it without a live person to connect it to. In all honesty, his dad probably tossed it at the airport or it just got lost in the shuffle. If that is the case then you lucked out. But to find out for sure order a copy. Take into consideration how long it takes to get the copy in reference to his 19th birthday.

      When you get the I-94 and if it shows not turned in the process won't be too expensive. You can probably do it yourself provided you follow the instructions to the letter. If the I-94 was turned in expect to spend a few thousand $ and a year or so apart with no guarantee. The problem is he will be banned for at least 3 years. Assuming you start before he turns 19. Wait past that and your looking at 10 yrs.

      If he is banned the only option is a hardship waiver, form I-601. As was explained the hardship is to you. Now, you would think separation is a hardship. In the eyes of USCIS it isn't. The ante is a bit higher. So will the cost. Something else to think about. When you order the copy that will alert ICE to his location so he will be subject to immediate deportation if captured.



      For yourself you may want to think about this whole process. This won't be easy and at the moment he is subject to immediate detention and removal. If he is picked up the bail will be between 5->10,000.00 The costs at that point will be very high for legal fees etc. Another issue is the AOS itself. Even if the I-94 was not turned in and he is not subject to any bans you will still need to qualify under I-864. In other words you need to be making some money. If you ask someone else to sponsor you need to keep in mind your asking someone to be financially responsible for him for 10 yrs. Not an easy thing to accept for anyone. Since your not working you would probably have to ask your family to sponsor him. Do you want to place that kind of obligation on them? If it doesn't work out your dad could and would be obligated to support him for the remaining part of the 10 yrs. Make sure all concerned know all the details. Its only fair to everyone. If everyone agrees then go for it. If not, perhaps you should pass.


      __________________________________________________________________
      I may not like what you say but I've defended your right to say it.
      Posts: 1450 | Location: San diego, CA & San Antonio TX | Registered: June 08, 2007

      Ignored post by davdah posted December 20, 2007 11:10 PM Show Post

      4now
      Power Member

      Posted December 21, 2007 04:01 AM Hide Post
      Hi

      So the Dad said.. "thats my story and Im sticking to it."

      You will know soon enough. Order copy of I-94. only then can you proceed and choose a strategy. Did you ask his father how could he have turned in the i-94 and also why would he turn in his son's i-94 if he was not returning?


      One more thing.. I just see that you also have 2 other threads running on the same subject. that is a no no here. Keep one thread relative to the same topic. This way you get more precise and accurate answers. the facts and details all remain in the same thread.

      Dont be discouraged. If you love him, stand by him all the way and eventually it will work out.
      Posts: 2396 | Registered: September 27, 2003

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes I know all that but i was looking for a more direct answer to the question... IS it POSSIBLE for parents to turn it in without child beingpresent/ and most importantly that was not answered... do they ask for identification when you turn in an I- 94
        -thanks

        Comment


        • #5
          There is a phone number listed at the bottom. I hope this will provide a bit more information. I, myself, don't see how it would be possible for the dad to turn in the I-94 without his son being present. But, try calling the number.


          What is an Arrival-Departure Document and Why Do I Need One?

          A USCIS Form I-94 (Arrival-Departure Record) or Form I-95 (Crewman's Landing Permit) shows the date you arrived in the United States and the "Admitted Until" date, the date when your authorized period of stay expires. You will receive an USCIS Form I-94 or I-95 from an USCIS inspector when arriving in the United States at a land border port-of-entry or from an airline or ship representative when arriving at an air or sea port-of-entry by aircraft or ship. The form must be completed and presented to an USCIS inspector who may ask you questions about the purpose of your trip, how long you will be in the United States, and your residence abroad. Do not lose this form. When you leave the country, you should give the USCIS Form I-94 or I-95 to your airline or ship representative, or, if you are departing over a land border, give it to a Mexican or Canadian immigration inspector. An USCIS Form I-94 or I-95 that has been approved by an USCIS inspector can prove that you arrived in the country legally and that you have not stayed beyond the period of stay authorized. In addition, turning in USCIS Form I-94 or I-95 to the proper authorities when you leave the country can prove that you did not violate U.S. laws by staying in the country too long. Proof that you are willing to obey U.S. immigration laws will be very important if you again want to travel to the U.S. as an immigrant or nonimmigrant in the future.

          If you are applying for an extension of stay or change of status, you will also need to be issued an USCIS Form I-94 or I-95 if you were not issued one of these documents when you entered the country.

          Canadians who travel to the United States as tourists or on business generally do not need an USCIS Form I-94. Also, certain Mexicans who have a nonresident alien Mexican border crossing card (commonly known as a laser visa), or a multiple-entry nonimmigrant visa may not need an USCIS Form I-94.

          If your USCIS Form I-94 (Arrival - Departure Record) or USCIS Form I-95 (Crewman's Landing Permit) is lost, stolen, or mutilated, you must replace it.



          I Need a New One - How Do I Apply?

          To replace a lost, stolen, or mutilated USCIS Form I-94 (Arrival-Departure Record) or Form I-95 (Crewman's Landing Permit), you must file USCIS Form I-102 (Application for Replacement/Initial Nonimmigrant Arrival - Departure Document). If the USCIS Form I-94 or Form I-95 is mutilated, attach the original form. If the USCIS Form I-94 or USCIS Form I-95 was lost or stolen, submit a copy of the original USCIS Form I-94. If you do not have a copy of your original USCIS Form I-94, submit a copy of the biographic/photo page from your passport and a copy of the passport page that was stamped by immigration inspectors when you entered the country. If you cannot submit any evidence of your legal admission to the United States, submit a full explanation and proof of your identity.

          If you are applying to extend your stay in the United States or change your immigration status, you will be asked to give USCIS your Form I-94. If you were not given an USCIS Form I-94 when you were legally admitted to the United States, file USCIS Form I-102. You will need to give USCIS proof that you were legally admitted to the United States. You should file USCIS Form I-102 at the same time that you apply to extend your stay in the United States or change your immigration status.

          Forms are available online, or by calling 1-800-870-3676, or by submitting an online request to receive forms by mail. After receiving Form I-102, read it carefully and note the documentation that must be submitted. Detailed information is provided in the accompanying instructions for Form I-102. Further information on forms, filing fees, and fee waivers is available in Forms, Fees & Filing Locations.






          Where Should I Send My Application?

          If you are applying to replace a lost, stolen, or mutilated USCIS Form I-95 (Crewman's Landing Permit), file USCIS Form I-102 (Application for Replacement/Initial Nonimmigrant Arrival-Departure Document) at the local USCIS office serving the area where you are temporarily located.

          If you are applying to extend your stay in the United States or change your immigration status, file USCIS Form I-102 at the same local office that is handling your extension of stay or change of status application.

          In all other instances, file USCIS Form I-102 at the appropriate USCIS Service Center for your region.






          How Can I Check the Status of My Application?

          Contact the USCIS office that received your application, and be prepared to provide specific information (see Checking the Status of My Case).



          How Can I Appeal?

          If your application for a replacement arrival-departure document is denied, you will receive a letter that will tell you why the application was denied. You will not be allowed to appeal a negative decision to a higher authority. However, you may submit a motion to reopen or a motion to reconsider with the same office that made the unfavorable decision. By filing these motions, you may ask the office to reexamine or reconsider their decision. A motion to reopen must state the new facts that are to be provided in the reopened proceeding and must be accompanied by affidavits or other documentary evidence. A motion to reconsider must establish that the decision was based on an incorrect application of law or USCIS policy, and further establish that the decision was incorrect based on the evidence in the file at the time the decision was made. For more information, see Appealing the Denial of My Petition or Application.






          HELP!

          For specific questions, contact your nearest USCIS District Office or Sub Office. This link provides telephone numbers, addresses, directions, office hours, local filing procedures, and more.

          Or, call the national USCIS toll-free information service at 1-800-375-5283

          http://www.foreignborn.com/visas_imm...rival.htm#what

          Comment


          • #6
            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by needing answers:
            This is a "what-if" type of question please don't comment back saying why would they do that.... if you know the answer it would be appreciated.....

            I have a question, do you have to show your identification when you turn in your I-94 when you leave the US? What I mean is like if you have minor children could the parents turn in thier I-94 for them if the children are not physically present with thier parents when they turn the I-94 in? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>



            Thank you Proud for summary/history of poster



            You are playing a dangerous game here. I am afraid this may backfire. You are either part of this or his parents are lying to you about this FRAUD. This is exactly what it is plain and simple. FRAUD. Now you are asking us how to help you pull this "fraud " off successfully with answerers to make a good story.

            Why havent you sent for the copy of the i94 to determine if it was in fact turned in. This is the safest way to determine if in fact it happened. Anything short of what USCIS has listed is going to blow up in your face.


            This is all a lie/scheme. And you are either in on it or just being naive and young. It is too bad the father was not smart enough to understand the immigration laws about overstay. Your husband would have been fine. But no.. he was trying to deceive, and this is now going to make a problem

            Obviously you have never traveled by airplane. You have to show identification, there is a boarding pass , if the boarding pass not turned in , then you are considered a no show.


            get the copy . if there is no record of him leaving, then fine. but if it was turned in somehow mysteriously. you will have a problem now because it is fraud. because if it was turned in, then there should also be a purchased ticket , boarding pass stub to reinforce that he was on the flight. and if that is so...... then he came back EWI.

            You just may be better off moving to mexico for 6 months, marry him there and do direct consulate filing for him. Then it will not even be an issue.

            oder the i-102. get the real story. but then again, I suspect you already know the real story.

            Comment

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