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  • Brit4064
    replied
    The H1b program is already very limited. Approximately 65,000 visas issued each year. The number varies a bit up or down and is set by Congress each year. In normal times 65k is nothing. Not even close to what industry here needs. Shutting it down will cause those jobs to disappear overseas and the US ultimately looses out. Going protectionist never has worked well in the past.

    Bill Gates Seeks Rise in Immigration of Highly Skilled Workers

    Leave a comment:


  • AmericanC
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Hudson:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Hudson:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:
    Why the extreme, which always fails

    Just have large reduction of the program proposed. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Also an extreme and will also fail. Protectionism by any standard, and especially in today's global market, will short change a country economically than it will benefit. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


    AS you well know, the H1b program has been greatly expanded over the years without real justification. Putting it back to the original levels is not unreasonable in this climate. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    As you well know, once it is lowered, no matter what the reason, it will never, or be extremely difficult, be increased, no matter what the reason. It is simply being used to limit legal immigration and to use an outdated practice called protectionism.

    But if you want to run the risk and have companies move jobs overseas, be my guest. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    And why should it be increased in the first place? Are you saying legal immigration should be limitless? Yes, these jobs may move overseas (it's not like American citizens are doing these jobs here in the first place; it's cheap overseas workers performing them here too.) There are a multitude of solutions proposed to stop jobs from going overseas if our lawmakers can come to their senses and implement some of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brit4064
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">But if you want to run the risk and have companies move jobs overseas, be my guest. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Exactly Hudson. Talk about an own goal.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hudson
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Hudson:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:
    Why the extreme, which always fails

    Just have large reduction of the program proposed. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Also an extreme and will also fail. Protectionism by any standard, and especially in today's global market, will short change a country economically than it will benefit. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


    AS you well know, the H1b program has been greatly expanded over the years without real justification. Putting it back to the original levels is not unreasonable in this climate. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    As you well know, once it is lowered, no matter what the reason, it will never, or be extremely difficult, be increased, no matter what the reason. It is simply being used to limit legal immigration and to use an outdated practice called protectionism.

    But if you want to run the risk and have companies move jobs overseas, be my guest.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4now
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Hudson:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:
    Why the extreme, which always fails

    Just have large reduction of the program proposed. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Also an extreme and will also fail. Protectionism by any standard, and especially in today's global market, will short change a country economically than it will benefit. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


    AS you well know, the H1b program has been greatly expanded over the years without real justification. Putting it back to the original levels is not unreasonable in this climate.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hudson
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NO AMNESTY!!!:
    I know about these 'qualified' foreign workers, like the hindu "doctors" that are blood****ing medicare and other insurance companies. Or the filipino nurses who cannot tell a band-aid from an aspirin. Pretty soon we're gonna have peruvian shamans, african witch doctors, and towel heads blowing smoke and prancing around the sick who don't have the guts to refuse to speak up. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Considering you really do not know the difference either, that puts you in the same boar, right NA.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hudson
    replied
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 4now:
    Why the extreme, which always fails

    Just have large reduction of the program proposed. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Also an extreme and will also fail. Protectionism by any standard, and especially in today's global market, will short change a country economically than it will benefit.

    Leave a comment:


  • NO AMNESTY!!!
    replied
    I know about these 'qualified' foreign workers, like the hindu "doctors" that are blood****ing medicare and other insurance companies. Or the filipino nurses who cannot tell a band-aid from an aspirin. Pretty soon we're gonna have peruvian shamans, african witch doctors, and towel heads blowing smoke and prancing around the sick who don't have the guts to refuse to speak up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    so Terry if you aro gung ho on bringing in cheap labor from overseas, let's start by replacing every immigration attorney in the US with someone who will only charge $25 an hour instead of $300....won't that be fair? and if not, why not? Why shouldn't ethically challenged immigration attorneys face the same 'competition' from cheap foreign labor? It's not as if anything US attorneys do is sancrosanct...filling out I 129s takes about 25 minutes; creating a bogus cover letter,perhaps 30, add postage and some xeroxes of phony diplomas, and voila, an instant H1B application in less than 90 minutes, yet US immigration attorneys charge in excess of $3000 for their "work." Why have foreigners pay so much? Let's hire about, oh, 10,000 foreign immigration attorneys who (a) know their culure better (b) will work for one tenth of what a US immigration attorney will charge and (c) can produce bogus papers as easily as anyone else.

    Leave a comment:


  • NO AMNESTY!!!
    replied
    I signed the petition, I hope that S12 and Federale86 did too. Let's pass the word around! good to hear from you S12

    Leave a comment:


  • Brit4064
    replied
    Oh nice. Stop legal temporary work visas while preaching free trade for all. Sounds like a Tea Party idea to me. The logic is about the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • Terry Martin
    replied
    Lenox, I think your comment comes down to the issue of protectionism - only the trade commodity here is labor. If we didn't let any foreigners into the US to work, that would set bad precedent for other countries, who might do the same. Then what if all countries did that - no one would be able to get a job in any other country. And this is economically inefficient.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    When the unemployment rate rises above, say, 5%, the H1B and employment-based categories should cease....we don't need to import thirty cents on the dollar labor and push or keep more Americans out of work...that is bee ess...and to continue these programs in the face of 9% unemployment is ludicrous...only enriching ethically challenged immigration attorneys (are there any other kind??) and sleazy business owners...

    Leave a comment:


  • lenox45
    replied
    It's odd that people here have a tought time finding jobs and we get people from other countries to work here on work visas

    More than 70% of the visas being granted in the H-1 B are to the big Indian outsourcing firms including Infosys /Tatas/ Wipros / Cognizant /Syntel etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4now
    replied
    Why the extreme, which always fails

    Just have large reduction of the program proposed.

    Leave a comment:

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