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  • Senate Immigration Subcommittee Holds Hearing on Securing our Borders and

    copy-paste

    sourse: http://www.shusterman.com/pdf/advocacy40804.pdf

    Senate Immigration Subcommittee Holds Hearing on Securing our Borders and
    Immigration Reform
    The Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security, and
    Citizenship held a hearing on April 1 entitled, "Securing our Borders under a Temporary Guest
    Worker Program." Testifying at the hearing were: Robert Bonner, Commissioner – U.S.
    Customs and Border Protection, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS); C. Stewart
    Verdery, Assistant Secretary for Border and Transportation Security Policy and Planning at the
    DHS; Donna Bucella, Director of the Terrorist Screening Center; Daniel Griswold of the Cato
    7
    Institute; and Margaret Stock, testifying for AILA and in her capacity as an expert on national
    security law.
    Most Senators at the hearing focused on the fact that the status quo is unacceptable, with
    Subcommittee Chair Saxby Chambliss (R-GA) focusing on the need to control our borders, and
    Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA) highlighting concerns about inadequate coordination at DHS
    and asking for updates on the implementation of the Border Security and Visa Entry Reform Act
    (which was signed into law in 2002). In her comments, Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)
    emphasized the primacy of addressing this nation's security needs and the fact that our borders
    are "not in the shape they need to be in." Senator Feinstein pressed Commissioner Bonner on the
    need to integrate our databases at our border and extracted a pledge from him that this integration
    would take place seven months after funding for this initiative was appropriated.
    Both Commissioner Bonner and Assistant Secretary Verdery praised the President's immigration
    reform proposal as key to fulfilling our security mandate. Both also focused on the US VISIT
    program and explained their request to extend for two years the October 26 biometric passport
    requirement. (To view AILA's Press Release on the Bush proposal, go to:
    http://www.aila.org/contentViewer.aspx?bc=9,594,4404. See also article no. 9 in Update on
    passport and US VISIT extensions.)
    Both Dan Griswold and Margaret Stock highlighted the linkage between securing our borders,
    enhancing our security, and immigration reform. Griswold reiterated that "Mexican migration is
    not a threat to national security" and focused on how our "obsession" with "keeping Mexicans
    from crossing our Southwest border illegally has not served our national security interests. It has
    diverted resources and attention away from efforts to identify and keep out people who truly
    intend to do us harm." He also spoke of the Enhanced Border Security and Visa Entry Reform
    Act as a bill "aimed at the right target – keeping terrorists out of the United States," and called for
    "real immigration reform" that would enhance our security by legalizing and regularizing the
    movement of workers across the U.S.-Mexican border and encouraging millions of
    undocumented workers to make themselves known to the authorities.
    In her testimony, Margaret Stock underscored that we need comprehensive immigration reform to
    meet our security needs, and the needs of American businesses and families. Such reform
    includes an earned adjustment for those who are here and contributing, a "break-the-mold"
    worker program; and family backlog reduction. In her testimony, she also made the following
    points:
    "¢ First, we secure our borders best by enhancing our intelligence capacity. National
    security is most effectively enhanced by improving the mechanisms for identifying actual
    terrorists, not by implementing harsher immigration laws or blindly treating all foreigners as
    potential terrorists. Policies and practices that fail to properly distinguish between terrorists
    and legitimate foreign travelers are ineffective security tools that waste limited resources,
    damage the U.S. economy, alienate those groups whose cooperation the U.S. government
    needs to prevent terrorism, and foster a false sense of security by promoting the illusion that
    we are reducing the threat of terrorism. Reforming our immigration laws will help us to
    identify those who seek to enter our country or are already residing here.
    "¢ Second, we need to make our borders our last line of defense. The physical borders of the
    United States should be our last line of defense because terrorism does not spring up at our
    borders. In fact, we need to re-conceptualize how we think about our "borders," because in
    our modern world they really start at our consulates abroad. The Enhanced Border Security
    and Visa Entry Reform Act of 2002, a law that AILA actively supported, is based on that
    assumption and must be actively implemented.
    "¢ Third, comprehensive immigration reform is an essential component of enhanced
    security. Our current immigration system is an obstacle to enhancing our security because it
    is dysfunctional. We currently allocate massive resources in a futile attempt to enforce a
    system that simply does not work. Our enforcement efforts could be far more effective if our
    laws made sense. A new "break-the-mold" guest worker program is an essential component
    to sensible reform that would help enhance our security and secure our borders because it
    would legalize the flow of people who enter our country. However, it is insufficient by itself.
    We also need to offer to those who are residing here AND working, paying taxes, and
    otherwise contributing the opportunity to earn their permanent legal status. We also need to
    recognize that blood is thicker than borders and deal squarely with the issue of family
    reunification and family backlog reductions so that nuclear families are not separated for up
    to twenty years by our dysfunctional laws. S. 2010, the Immigration Reform Act of 2004,
    introduced by Senators Chuck Hagel (R-NE) and Tom Daschle (D-SD), is the only initiative
    introduced to date that includes all three components necessary for comprehensive reform.


    Go to http://www.aila.org/newsViewer.aspx?bc=273&docID=12677 to view Margaret Stock's
    complete testimony.

  • #2
    copy-paste

    sourse: http://www.shusterman.com/pdf/advocacy40804.pdf

    Senate Immigration Subcommittee Holds Hearing on Securing our Borders and
    Immigration Reform
    The Senate Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Immigration, Border Security, and
    Citizenship held a hearing on April 1 entitled, "Securing our Borders under a Temporary Guest
    Worker Program." Testifying at the hearing were: Robert Bonner, Commissioner – U.S.
    Customs and Border Protection, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS); C. Stewart
    Verdery, Assistant Secretary for Border and Transportation Security Policy and Planning at the
    DHS; Donna Bucella, Director of the Terrorist Screening Center; Daniel Griswold of the Cato
    7
    Institute; and Margaret Stock, testifying for AILA and in her capacity as an expert on national
    security law.
    Most Senators at the hearing focused on the fact that the status quo is unacceptable, with
    Subcommittee Chair Saxby Chambliss (R-GA) focusing on the need to control our borders, and
    Senator Edward Kennedy (D-MA) highlighting concerns about inadequate coordination at DHS
    and asking for updates on the implementation of the Border Security and Visa Entry Reform Act
    (which was signed into law in 2002). In her comments, Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)
    emphasized the primacy of addressing this nation's security needs and the fact that our borders
    are "not in the shape they need to be in." Senator Feinstein pressed Commissioner Bonner on the
    need to integrate our databases at our border and extracted a pledge from him that this integration
    would take place seven months after funding for this initiative was appropriated.
    Both Commissioner Bonner and Assistant Secretary Verdery praised the President's immigration
    reform proposal as key to fulfilling our security mandate. Both also focused on the US VISIT
    program and explained their request to extend for two years the October 26 biometric passport
    requirement. (To view AILA's Press Release on the Bush proposal, go to:
    http://www.aila.org/contentViewer.aspx?bc=9,594,4404. See also article no. 9 in Update on
    passport and US VISIT extensions.)
    Both Dan Griswold and Margaret Stock highlighted the linkage between securing our borders,
    enhancing our security, and immigration reform. Griswold reiterated that "Mexican migration is
    not a threat to national security" and focused on how our "obsession" with "keeping Mexicans
    from crossing our Southwest border illegally has not served our national security interests. It has
    diverted resources and attention away from efforts to identify and keep out people who truly
    intend to do us harm." He also spoke of the Enhanced Border Security and Visa Entry Reform
    Act as a bill "aimed at the right target – keeping terrorists out of the United States," and called for
    "real immigration reform" that would enhance our security by legalizing and regularizing the
    movement of workers across the U.S.-Mexican border and encouraging millions of
    undocumented workers to make themselves known to the authorities.
    In her testimony, Margaret Stock underscored that we need comprehensive immigration reform to
    meet our security needs, and the needs of American businesses and families. Such reform
    includes an earned adjustment for those who are here and contributing, a "break-the-mold"
    worker program; and family backlog reduction. In her testimony, she also made the following
    points:
    "¢ First, we secure our borders best by enhancing our intelligence capacity. National
    security is most effectively enhanced by improving the mechanisms for identifying actual
    terrorists, not by implementing harsher immigration laws or blindly treating all foreigners as
    potential terrorists. Policies and practices that fail to properly distinguish between terrorists
    and legitimate foreign travelers are ineffective security tools that waste limited resources,
    damage the U.S. economy, alienate those groups whose cooperation the U.S. government
    needs to prevent terrorism, and foster a false sense of security by promoting the illusion that
    we are reducing the threat of terrorism. Reforming our immigration laws will help us to
    identify those who seek to enter our country or are already residing here.
    "¢ Second, we need to make our borders our last line of defense. The physical borders of the
    United States should be our last line of defense because terrorism does not spring up at our
    borders. In fact, we need to re-conceptualize how we think about our "borders," because in
    our modern world they really start at our consulates abroad. The Enhanced Border Security
    and Visa Entry Reform Act of 2002, a law that AILA actively supported, is based on that
    assumption and must be actively implemented.
    "¢ Third, comprehensive immigration reform is an essential component of enhanced
    security. Our current immigration system is an obstacle to enhancing our security because it
    is dysfunctional. We currently allocate massive resources in a futile attempt to enforce a
    system that simply does not work. Our enforcement efforts could be far more effective if our
    laws made sense. A new "break-the-mold" guest worker program is an essential component
    to sensible reform that would help enhance our security and secure our borders because it
    would legalize the flow of people who enter our country. However, it is insufficient by itself.
    We also need to offer to those who are residing here AND working, paying taxes, and
    otherwise contributing the opportunity to earn their permanent legal status. We also need to
    recognize that blood is thicker than borders and deal squarely with the issue of family
    reunification and family backlog reductions so that nuclear families are not separated for up
    to twenty years by our dysfunctional laws. S. 2010, the Immigration Reform Act of 2004,
    introduced by Senators Chuck Hagel (R-NE) and Tom Daschle (D-SD), is the only initiative
    introduced to date that includes all three components necessary for comprehensive reform.


    Go to http://www.aila.org/newsViewer.aspx?bc=273&docID=12677 to view Margaret Stock's
    complete testimony.

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