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F1 visa overstayed and Voluntary Departure

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  • F1 visa overstayed and Voluntary Departure

    a friend went to the USA with an F1 visa and by 2001 he failed to renew it due to extenuating circumstances. He couldn't go to his homeland/origin because he was also finishing his university studies. He took up his studies again by 2005 after recuperating from his motor accident and received a generous loan from his mother. Then he helped a friend and in return, stole his identity (and money saved up to finished his school). The culprit's escape was to turn in this friend of mine and told USCIS that he is a dangerous terrorist. After the nightmares, my friend decided to plea for and was granted Voluntary Departure. Now he is back home since February 2006. Here are his problems: 1) He still got ALL his stuff in the US that his other friends have not been able to follow up in sending it to him (he still living in his suitcase); 2) He's got a fiance there whom he'd like to visit; 3) He is asked by his best friend to be the best man at their wedding in April; 4) He needs to attend a professional conference that deals with his job/company now.

    How can he go back to the US? He has no interest of going to school there, so he is not interested in applying for an F1 visa in the future. they told him that there is no ban, and yet another person says that he has some 'punishment' to pay for the violation. Can someone clarify his? How can he go back to the US? Can an invitation to a wedding be a start? If he is to go, it will be either as a tourist or for business...or even both (he does have a gf). Sorry for the length, but I thoght you folks should have an overview...Thanks for the help. If you have a VERY GOOD advise, email it to my company so I can forward it to him: admin@mjsstrategies.com

  • #2
    a friend went to the USA with an F1 visa and by 2001 he failed to renew it due to extenuating circumstances. He couldn't go to his homeland/origin because he was also finishing his university studies. He took up his studies again by 2005 after recuperating from his motor accident and received a generous loan from his mother. Then he helped a friend and in return, stole his identity (and money saved up to finished his school). The culprit's escape was to turn in this friend of mine and told USCIS that he is a dangerous terrorist. After the nightmares, my friend decided to plea for and was granted Voluntary Departure. Now he is back home since February 2006. Here are his problems: 1) He still got ALL his stuff in the US that his other friends have not been able to follow up in sending it to him (he still living in his suitcase); 2) He's got a fiance there whom he'd like to visit; 3) He is asked by his best friend to be the best man at their wedding in April; 4) He needs to attend a professional conference that deals with his job/company now.

    How can he go back to the US? He has no interest of going to school there, so he is not interested in applying for an F1 visa in the future. they told him that there is no ban, and yet another person says that he has some 'punishment' to pay for the violation. Can someone clarify his? How can he go back to the US? Can an invitation to a wedding be a start? If he is to go, it will be either as a tourist or for business...or even both (he does have a gf). Sorry for the length, but I thoght you folks should have an overview...Thanks for the help. If you have a VERY GOOD advise, email it to my company so I can forward it to him: admin@mjsstrategies.com

    Comment


    • #3
      what a crock of $hit. This jagoff is just looking for a way back to the US, where this $hitbag scam artist thumbed his irresponsible nose at our laws, dreamed up a thousand excuses for his bs (should have been an immigration attorney) and now wants a free pass....eff him and the donkey he rode in on...I have never heard so much baloney and so many half-a$$ed excuses as to why this j e rkoff has to come back to my country....why not include a heart transplant as well? This clown is a first class dirtbag -- and the US of A does not need nor want his presence within our borders. Try video conferencing....it works just as well.

      Comment


      • #4
        it's easy for you to talk like that when you are not in his shoes. i know his story and I've known him for 17 years, so no, I don't believe his story is %(&¤/(&% like you descrube it. I have visited him in the US and I KNOW FOR A FACT, his friends over there hasn't sent him ANY of his stuff. He's got legit reasons, and don't worry, he is very happy that he's back in Europe with us since the paranoia and back-stabbing in the US (as he experienced) is too much for him. His gf has plans to move here so you can breathe Mr. Someone12, he doesn't have ambitions to ever become a US citizen.

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        • #5
          just because you two pick up the soap for each other does not lend credibility to your story....let this clown stay where he is...who gives a rat's a$$?

          Comment


          • #6
            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by VikingFlip:
            a friend went to the USA with an F1 visa and by 2001 he failed to renew it due to extenuating circumstances. He couldn't go to his homeland/origin because he was also finishing his university studies. He took up his studies again by 2005 after recuperating from his motor accident and received a generous loan from his mother. Then he helped a friend and in return, stole his identity (and money saved up to finished his school). The culprit's escape was to turn in this friend of mine and told USCIS that he is a dangerous terrorist. After the nightmares, my friend decided to plea for and was granted Voluntary Departure. Now he is back home since February 2006. Here are his problems: 1) He still got ALL his stuff in the US that his other friends have not been able to follow up in sending it to him (he still living in his suitcase); 2) He's got a fiance there whom he'd like to visit; 3) He is asked by his best friend to be the best man at their wedding in April; 4) He needs to attend a professional conference that deals with his job/company now.

            How can he go back to the US? He has no interest of going to school there, so he is not interested in applying for an F1 visa in the future. they told him that there is no ban, and yet another person says that he has some 'punishment' to pay for the violation. Can someone clarify his? How can he go back to the US? Can an invitation to a wedding be a start? If he is to go, it will be either as a tourist or for business...or even both (he does have a gf). Sorry for the length, but I thoght you folks should have an overview...Thanks for the help. If you have a VERY GOOD advise, email it to my company so I can forward it to him: admin@mjsstrategies.com </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
            File the I-601 waiver with an explanation of the serious medical incident and the identity theft of the friend he helped at the US Embassy of his home country. Because of the overstay lasting more than a year, there will automatically be a ten year ban. The filing of the waiver is required during the ten year ban if you want to re-enter the US during the ban. Further, given that you are seeking employment and have a fiance, this will be for an immigrant visa. If you are applying for a non-immigrant visa, file form I-212 at the US consulate. There is no guarantee that it will be approved, but I would strongly suggest legal help to give your friend the best possible chance. Good luck to your friend.
            "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

            Comment


            • #7
              sorry, but an I 601 is for immigrant visas - and this visa cheat is looking to scam a tourist visa. First he has to make our embassy believe he is a bona fide tourist (yea, right), then and only then could he ask for a waiver under a different section of law - 212 d 3 a. Of course, there is little chance that this would be approved.

              Comment


              • #8
                ...when Someone12 says that "there is little chance" that a waiver would be approved, he - as always - proves himself to be the master of understatement. Try: NO CHANCE!!!

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                • #9
                  "no chance"is OK by me.

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                  • #10
                    Mods please pay particular attention to someone12's and SunDownerUSA's posts here - particularly the disgusting display of fellatio that SunDownerUSA performs on his fellow forum idiot someone12 - these 2 need to be banned like LAST YEAR.

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