Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

XENOPHOBIA

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • XENOPHOBIA

    Xenophobia -


    Xenophobia denotes a phobic attitude toward strangers or of the unknown and comes from the Greek words ξένος (xenos), meaning "foreigner," "stranger," and φόβος (phobos), meaning "fear." The term is typically used to describe fear or dislike of foreigners or in general of people different from one's self. For example, racism is sometimes described as a form of xenophobia. In science fiction, it has come to mean "fear of extraterrestrial things." Xenophobia implies a belief, accurate or not, that the target is in some way foreign. Prejudice against women cannot be considered xenophobic in this sense, except in the limited case of all-male clubs or institutions. The term xenophilia is used for the opposite behavior, attraction to or love for foreign persons.

    The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition ("DSM-IV") includes in its description of a phobia an "intense anxiety" which follows exposure to the "object of the phobia, either in real life or via imagination or video..." For xenophobia there are two main objects of the phobia. The first is a population group present within a society, which is not considered part of that society. Often they are recent immigrants, but xenophobia may be directed against a group which has been present for centuries. This form of xenophobia can elicit or facilitate hostile and violent reactions, such as mass expulsion of immigrants, or in the worst case, genocide.

    The second form of xenophobia is primarily cultural, and the object of the phobia is cultural elements which are considered alien. All cultures are subject to external influences, but cultural xenophobia is often narrowly directed, for instance at foreign loan words in a national language. It rarely leads to aggression against persons, but can result in political campaigns for cultural or linguistic purification. Isolationism, a general aversion of foreign affairs, is not accurately described as xenophobia.

    Xenophobia was a major problem after World War I when returning soldiers found themselves competing for jobs and housing with foreigners. This led to riots, racial tensions, etc..

  • #2
    Xenophobia -


    Xenophobia denotes a phobic attitude toward strangers or of the unknown and comes from the Greek words ξένος (xenos), meaning "foreigner," "stranger," and φόβος (phobos), meaning "fear." The term is typically used to describe fear or dislike of foreigners or in general of people different from one's self. For example, racism is sometimes described as a form of xenophobia. In science fiction, it has come to mean "fear of extraterrestrial things." Xenophobia implies a belief, accurate or not, that the target is in some way foreign. Prejudice against women cannot be considered xenophobic in this sense, except in the limited case of all-male clubs or institutions. The term xenophilia is used for the opposite behavior, attraction to or love for foreign persons.

    The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition ("DSM-IV") includes in its description of a phobia an "intense anxiety" which follows exposure to the "object of the phobia, either in real life or via imagination or video..." For xenophobia there are two main objects of the phobia. The first is a population group present within a society, which is not considered part of that society. Often they are recent immigrants, but xenophobia may be directed against a group which has been present for centuries. This form of xenophobia can elicit or facilitate hostile and violent reactions, such as mass expulsion of immigrants, or in the worst case, genocide.

    The second form of xenophobia is primarily cultural, and the object of the phobia is cultural elements which are considered alien. All cultures are subject to external influences, but cultural xenophobia is often narrowly directed, for instance at foreign loan words in a national language. It rarely leads to aggression against persons, but can result in political campaigns for cultural or linguistic purification. Isolationism, a general aversion of foreign affairs, is not accurately described as xenophobia.

    Xenophobia was a major problem after World War I when returning soldiers found themselves competing for jobs and housing with foreigners. This led to riots, racial tensions, etc..

    Comment


    • #3
      Down With XENOPHOPBIA in New 2006!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Xenophobia is a condition that exists primarily OUTSIDE of the U.S.

        Mexico is very hostile toward individuals from central america

        Comment


        • #5
          XENOPHOBIA IS XENOPHOBIA, regardless of its' geographical location

          Comment


          • #6
            I could not agree more, I just wonder why the U.S. is always bearing the brunt of the argument.

            Maybe its because we are allowed to freely express our opinions here without the threat of torture or imprisonment. You don't see people screaming about Xenophobia (or much else) in China, Serbia, Venezuala.

            Maybe we should remember that the reason everyone is lining up to get into this country has to do with more than the economy

            Comment


            • #7
              XENOPHOBIA = XENOPHOBIA,
              regardless of where who speaks of what

              Comment


              • #8
                Actually Xenophobia = oppression if not readily identified as xenophobia. Look at the recent riots in France for example.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sugarpuff,
                  I copy-paste this for you:

                  "Xenophobia denotes a phobic attitude toward strangers or of the unknown and comes from the Greek words ξένος (xenos), meaning "foreigner," "stranger," and φόβος (phobos), meaning "fear." The term is typically used to describe fear or dislike of foreigners or in general of people different from one's self. For example, racism is sometimes described as a form of xenophobia. In science fiction, it has come to mean "fear of extraterrestrial things." Xenophobia implies a belief, accurate or not, that the target is in some way foreign. Prejudice against women cannot be considered xenophobic in this sense, except in the limited case of all-male clubs or institutions. The term xenophilia is used for the opposite behavior, attraction to or love for foreign persons.

                  The American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition ("DSM-IV") includes in its description of a phobia an "intense anxiety" which follows exposure to the "object of the phobia, either in real life or via imagination or video..." For xenophobia there are two main objects of the phobia. The first is a population group present within a society, which is not considered part of that society. Often they are recent immigrants, but xenophobia may be directed against a group which has been present for centuries. This form of xenophobia can elicit or facilitate hostile and violent reactions, such as mass expulsion of immigrants, or in the worst case, genocide.

                  The second form of xenophobia is primarily cultural, and the object of the phobia is cultural elements which are considered alien. All cultures are subject to external influences, but cultural xenophobia is often narrowly directed, for instance at foreign loan words in a national language. It rarely leads to aggression against persons, but can result in political campaigns for cultural or linguistic purification. Isolationism, a general aversion of foreign affairs, is not accurately described as xenophobia.

                  Xenophobia was a major problem after World War I when returning soldiers found themselves competing for jobs and housing with foreigners. This led to riots, racial tensions, etc.."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Based on your argument, the problems we are having in Iraq and the rest of the middle east then are the result of the irrational phobias of the native people.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ImmortalE once again proves his or her Anti-American credentials. Any immigrant of the bash-America-first variety needs to back to their country of origin.

                      Americans have a long history of welcomong immigrants. Expecting that said immigrants come to America legally is not xenophobic. Likewise, expecting that immigrants learn English and assimilate to American culture is not xenophobic.

                      Immigrants who disregard America's laws and sovereignty are xenophobic.

                      Immigrants who refuse to speak English or assimilate to the best of their ability are xenophobic.

                      Immigrants who expect that Americans learn Spanish - or some other foreign language - rather than they themselves learning English are xenophobic.

                      I believe that an immigrant who purports to love his "language" and "culture" so much that he refuses to assimilate is xenophobic. Such an immigrant would also be better to go home to his country of origin.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sugarpuff and SunDevil


                        Notice that I wrote nothing on this thread except stating that XENOPHPBIA is XENOPHOBIA, no matter where.

                        And the article I copy-pasted comes from the online enciclopedia.

                        As a matter of fact, this thread served as kind of word association test, whereby both of you have revealed your subconscious thoughts.

                        As far as for question about problems in Iraq, I beleive our soldiers are there to bring to Middle East Freedom and Democracy and by all means it is not an easy task, but in the end America will succeed.
                        And our cause is Noble one.

                        What I find EGREGIOUSLY HYPOCRITICAL is when someone who knows that our soldiers die in Iraq fighting for Freedom and Democracy, yet he/she would rather spend their spare time here on demagoguery, on immigrant-bashing and inciting hatred against immigrants here, pretending to do so in American interests.
                        It is YOU, SunDevil, BTW who constantly shows Anti-American credentioals, and now you resort to personal attacks without ANY justification whatsoever (Mind you: there is nothing I wrote in this thread other than that Xenophobia is Xenophobia).

                        If you, SunDevil, aren't XENOPHOBE, then WHO IS?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          anyone who applaudes the concept of illegal immigration is unfairly taunting people with promises that can not be fulfilled.

                          The American dream is not available to individuals here illegally. To say otherwise merely perpetuate misery for those who think it is possible.

                          You are so zealous about dispelling Xenopohobia that you are unwittingly promoting oppression.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have never APPLAUDED the concept of illegal immigration.
                            In fact I deplore the fact that such concept exists.
                            You are grossly misleading everyone if you imply the opposite.

                            Read carefully what I wrote over and over on this board:

                            [quote, ImmortalE]
                            I am not as foolish as to imagine that law will be suddenly discarded because I wish so.
                            But I say let us at least be honest about it and say aloud that we have Double Standards on INA and immigration discussions, and see if public really likes it.
                            Instead you hear people like Someone12 always shout aloud that they are all for EQUAL APPLICATION OF LAWS, that they are all for FAIRNESS and so on.
                            This is hypocritical!
                            And that's where I will never concede.

                            Let anyone say and do as they wish, but I will not bend my consciousnes and say "2 X 2 = 12 because Someone12 said so".[/quote]

                            I see HYPOCRISY where people like Someone12 shout day and night about their committment to FAIRNESS, LAW and JUSTICE on one hand and loudly advocate arbitrary measures& laws that subject immigrants to UNFAIR, UNCONSTITUTIONAL treatment (as opposed to the rest) on the other hand.

                            [quote, ImmortalE] It is not concievable under US Constitution to establish different sets of standards for various segments of population on how to prosecute those who violate the LAWS.

                            If LAW is the LAW and EVERYONE IS EQUALLY Held Responsible, then it is inconsistent to refuse the EQUALLY FAIR trial and consideration to certain segment of population as opposed to the rest.

                            But if you still ,arbitrarily and without justification, insisted on enacting and applying laws INCONSISTENTLY, then you would first need to discard the notion of EQUALITY and FAIRNESS, get rif of US Constitution, better define the interests you serve and only then advocate arbitrary measures and practices, or else you would be a HYPOCRITE.
                            And that's where it boils down. [/quote]



                            Read my opinion in full here:

                            http://discuss.ilw.com/eve/forums/a/...0510487921/p/5

                            http://discuss.ilw.com/eve/forums/a/...0510487921/p/6

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Here is your argument as I see it:

                              you are not promoting or condoning illegal immigration because you don't believe that it should be illegal. Indeed you think that the law making illegal immigraiton is in itself illegal therefore the underlying act is by default well....legal, or at the very least moraly defensible.

                              Noted, but you are still missing my point: Immigration laws exist and those that break them (whether they are on the rigt side of the moral argument or not) do so at the cost of their own future,

                              and this "future" is the very reason they come here in the first place.

                              Comment

                              Sorry, you are not authorized to view this page

                              Home Page

                              Immigration Daily

                              Archives

                              Processing times

                              Immigration forms

                              Discussion board

                              Resources

                              Blogs

                              Twitter feed

                              Immigrant Nation

                              Attorney2Attorney

                              CLE Workshops

                              Immigration books

                              Advertise on ILW

                              EB-5

                              移民日报

                              About ILW.COM

                              Connect to us

                              Questions/Comments

                              SUBSCRIBE

                              Immigration Daily



                              Working...
                              X