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McCain Says Senate Immigration Bill Does Not Amount to Amnesty

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    all this phony amnesty krap just means "Visas for Sale - $2000 - Inquire witin."

    Why should we cheapen the privilege of coming to the US legally?

    Leave a comment:


  • NYC001
    replied
    Senators Divided on Illegal Immigrants By

    Should they stay or should they go, those 11 million illegal immigrants living in the United States?

    While that question hangs over a Senate debate on border security and immigration, most senators agree on allowing undocumented workers to stay at least temporarily. The fight is over whether they should have to leave three years to six years down the road.

    Even senators who oppose providing a path to citizenship to illegal immigrants are willing to grant them temporary legal status as long as they register with the government, pay fines and eventually leave.

    "Our first obligation is to bring them out of the shadows, make sure we know who they are, why they're here, make sure we have a name and some kind of identification for them," Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist said in an interview with The Associated Press.

    "Then there will be a period of time, whether it's three years or six years ... but they can continue to work here and at that point in time "” that's where the debate is "” do they have to go home or are they put on some sort of path to citizenship?" Frist said.

    As the Senate opened two weeks of debate Wednesday night, Republicans clashed over whether providing a path to legal citizenship would lead to more flouting of U.S. immigration laws.

    President Bush reiterated support for a temporary worker program as he took off for a meeting in Cancun, Mexico, with host President Vicente Fox and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

    Bush said workers should be given tamper-resistant identity cards and go to the back of the line when they seek citizenship.

    "I think it makes sense to have a temporary worker program that says you're not an automatic citizen to help, one, enforce the border; and, two, uphold the decency of America," Bush said Wednesday.

    Sen. Edward Kennedy (news, bio, voting record), D-Mass., who has proposed with Sen. John McCain (news, bio, voting record), R-Ariz., allowing illegal immigrants earn a path to citizenship through work, was buoyed by Bush's comments.

    "We should reject temporary status and required departure because they are bad for business," Kennedy said. "What do we gain if millions of immigrant workers who fuel our economy are required to spend weeks "” or years or decades under some plans "” waiting outside the United States for permission to continue their work?"

    Frist dodged the question of what to do about illegal immigrants in the country in the bill he introduced. But other bills that could be offered as amendments tackle that issue.

    On Monday, Sen. Arlen Specter (news, bio, voting record), R-Pa., shepherded legislation containing the McCain-Kennedy proposal through the Senate Judiciary Committee on a 12-6 vote. He insisted the bill is not amnesty because illegal immigrants would have to undergo background checks, pay fines, back taxes and clear other obstacles before getting on the "citizenship track." They wouldn't have to leave the United States.

    "If there is a better way to bring these 11 million people forward so that we can identify them, we are open to any suggestions which anyone may have," Specter, the committee's chairman, said.

    Sens. John Cornyn, R-Texas, and Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., rail against what they call "amnesty" but would give illegal immigrants six months to register with the government. Those who do, could stay in the U.S., but only for up to five years. They would have to pay $2,000 fines annually for the privilege. Those who don't could be deported.

    The immigrants who register could return as guest workers, but would have to apply for legal permanent residency "” a step to citizenship "” from their home countries.

    Under current law, a person who is in the country illegally for more than 180 days cannot re-enter the U.S. for three years. A person in the country illegally for more than a year cannot re-enter for 10 years. Those prohibitions would be waived for immigrants who register with the government under the Cornyn-Kyl plan.

    The proposal gives illegal immigrants a chance to "get into compliance with our laws," Cornyn said.

    "Illegal immigrants must be required to return home so they go through the same legal channels as everyone else," he said. "Otherwise, even with the minimal penalties in the pending amnesty proposal, illegal immigrants would be rewarded at the expense of those who have followed the law."

    Leave a comment:


  • NYC001
    replied
    03/30/2006: Momentum is Building for Immigration Reform

    The real test for the success of the Senate's comprehensive immigration reform lies with the House once the Senate passes the bill. Recently, however, some of the key House leaders came forward to rescue Bush in support of his Guest Worker Program which is considered the most serious roadblock to the legislation. For instance, report indicates that the House Speaker Dennis Hastert indicated today that he was willing to consider a guest worker program as part of the immigration-reform package now moving through Congress.
    This is the time everyone should work hard to make it work and think positive. Please keep contacting the Senators and the members of the House to support the immigration reform legislation. People should set aside the politics and the immigrant community should unite to seize the momentum. Last thing the community wants to see will be disagreements and division within the community.
    Whether legal or illegal, they are in the same pot and navigating together.

    Leave a comment:


  • NYC001
    replied
    Senate GOP Debates if Bill Equals Amnesty

    The Senate opened debate on an election-year immigration bill Wednesday, and leading Republicans swiftly clashed over whether the legislation would amount to amnesty for millions of illegal residents in the United States.

    The legislation "goes too far in granting illegal immigrants with what most Americans will see as amnesty," said Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee, the first to speak on the bill. "I disagree with this approach ... because granting amnesty now will only encourage further and further disrespect for the law."

    Moments later, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Sen. Arlen Specter (news, bio, voting record) of Pennsylvania, bluntly rebutted his fellow Republican. "I want to disagree with him head on. It is not amnesty," he said. Specter said illegal residents would have to be current on their taxes, undergo background checks and clear other obstacles before gaining a place on a "citizenship track."

    The disagreement underscored not only the divisions within the Senate, but the extent to which the fate of 11 million illegal immigrants has come to dominate the issue. Adding a fresh layer of political complexity, Hispanics make up a fast-growing segment of the electorate and have demonstrated by the hundreds of thousands in recent days in opposition to punitive legislation.

    In general, the bill under consideration in the Senate is designed to strengthen enforcement of U.S. borders, regulate the flow into the country of so-called guest workers and determine the legal future of the illegal population scattered across all 50 states.

    The House has passed legislation limited to border enforcement. Republican leaders have signaled in recent days they are receptive to an expanded measure, and immigration has taken on added importance for the GOP in the run-up to midterm elections.

    "We are not going to discount anything right now," House Speaker Dennis Hastert said several hours before the Senate debate opened. "Our first priority is to protect the borders. We also know there is a need in some sectors of this economy for a guest worker program," added the Illinois Republican.

    President Bush has urged Congress to approve legislation that strengthens border security and contains enforcement at the workplace and a temporary guest worker program.

    "There are people doing jobs Americans will not do," Bush told reporters Wednesday. "Many people who have come into our country are helping our economy grow. That's just a fact of life."

    Specter shepherded legislation through the Judiciary Committee on Monday on a vote of 12-6. The outcome was unusual in the Republican-controlled Senate since there were more GOP committee members against the measure than voting in favor.

    The Pennsylvania Republican said at the time he would continue to seek agreement on changes, and he repeated his remarks on the Senate floor. "If there is a better way to bring these 11 million people forward so that we can identify them, we are open to any suggestions which anyone may have," he said.

    Frist and Specter were not the only lawmakers to address the issue of amnesty, an emotionally charged label that political candidates all hope to avoid.

    Sen. Patrick Leahy (news, bio, voting record) of Vermont, the senior Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, sided with the panel's chairman. "Opponents of a fair, comprehensive approach are quick to claim that anything but the most punitive provisions are amnesty. They are wrong," he said.

    But Sen. Jeff Sessions (news, bio, voting record), R-Alabama, was quick to counter. "The truth is this bill is amnesty," he said, adding that if others insist on saying otherwise, "we'll keep talking about it every day this week."

    The legislation that cleared committee would double the Border Patrol and allow for a virtual wall of unmanned vehicles, cameras and sensors to monitor the U.S.-Mexico border. It also calls for detention facilities for an additional 10,000 immigrants who may face deportation.

    The committee voted down proposed criminal penalties on immigrants found to be in the country illegally.

    The bill would establish a temporary program for up to 1.5 million farm workers who are in the country illegally, giving them an opportunity to achieve legal status.

    Separately, it creates a new guest worker program for would-be immigrants, allowing them to enter the country under a three-year visa, renewable for another three years, then apply for legal permanent residence without leaving the United States. The program would initially be open to 400,000 individuals a year, a figure to be adjusted annually based on the labor market.

    Leave a comment:


  • Houston
    replied
    This could be a problem with the Specter bill. Overloading the USCIS is not a good idea. After all, applications for guest worker visas should not he handled lightly, incomplete background checks and rushed adjudications are inconsistent with the very intent of the bill.

    Leave a comment:


  • marmaduk
    replied
    Houston, perhaps that'll indeed be part of the reform. A waiver that will allow them to reenter while requiring it be processed ala consular processing. It'll also help lessen USCIS load somewhat.

    Leave a comment:


  • LieMaster
    replied
    I have no doubt that they all would promptly leave, on premises that they just may get a work visa to come back !

    HEHEHE ! Those fools ! Once out who will let them in?!

    HEHEHE!

    Leave a comment:


  • Houston
    replied
    Indeed, there's nothing wrong with requiring applicants to leave the U.S. for consular processing. It could be done in the style of the "pre-approved" I-212 waiver.

    Leave a comment:


  • marmaduk
    replied
    Having a legal system that acts against the best interest of a country is wrong by definition. Having an immigration system that would hinder efforts of the authorities in determining the whereabouts of millions of people, while preventing contributions from such groups to society is detrimental to the nation. An all-out amnesty is also contrary to national security.
    Then based on that argument, there's nothing wrong with requiring illegals to leave the country first and then be readmitted and documented properly by the authorities. Yet, the sentiment among pro-illegal is against doing even that.
    Also, its not clear what background check will be performed on illegals to gain legalization. Would misdemeanor be a big enough mark, or does it have to be felony and above?

    As long as the amnesty or reform (or whatever its gonna be called) was handed out before the border patrol problem is addressed/fixed, we'll be faced with the same problem in 10-20yrs, if not sooner.

    Leave a comment:


  • LieMaster
    replied
    "For the past several weeks, we have been organizing a national Save the American Worker campaign, because of the devastating effect that a massive guest worker amnesty program will have on middle class workers. In light of the GAO findings and the Senate's indifference, we probably need a Save the American Worker from Getting Blown Up campaign as well," Stein concluded.

    www.fairus.org

    Leave a comment:


  • Houston
    replied
    The speech of Sen. Durbin had the special touch of citing real life examples of how the DREAM act would touch people. Other go back in time to 1986 and compare the SJC bill to that infamous amnesty law.
    If comparisons are in order and 1986 could be compared to 2006, then let's fire up that time machine! The U.S. is a superpower today thanks in great part to its nuclear capabilities. But I'm not going to mention Einstein but another immigrant, inadmissible under today's INA. Mr. Von Braun. This notorious german scientist and father of the modern rocket, was also a notorious member of the Nazi party. Without Von Braun there would be no ICBM's, no Mercury, Gemini or Apollo missions, no solid rocket boosters for the Space Shuttle program, no delivery systems for satellites and modern telecommunications.
    Having a legal system that acts against the best interest of a country is wrong by definition. Having an immigration system that would hinder efforts of the authorities in determining the whereabouts of millions of people, while preventing contributions from such groups to society is detrimental to the nation. An all-out amnesty is also contrary to national security.
    The Specter bill provides an approach, based on compromise, to the illegal immigration problem. The act does provide a path to legal residency, but it's a lengthy path, strictly regulated.
    Just like the imposition of fines and restitution in lieu of prison time is not the same as a dismissal, the imposition of regulations, fines and conditions in exchange for a "chance" at legal status is not amnesty.

    Leave a comment:


  • NYC001
    replied
    Senators Delay Immigration Debate to Work Behind the Scenes

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  • AliBA
    replied
    Yup. We're no different than most of Congress, which you can bet will be doing its homework on immigration over the next few weeks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Antifascist1
    replied
    Roll the b a l l s down the slope and watch.

    Get an idea, a grasp of what Energy is, what momentum is, what velocity is, what mass is..

    Almost everyone who posts on this board is engaging in empty rhetoric - but too little, too narrow understanding of what is actually taking place.

    Leave a comment:


  • Glühbirne
    replied
    Living in a shadowy corner of heaven is a lot better than living in the nicest part of hell. Living in the shadows in the US is better than living in most of the countries of origin of aliens. 4 dollars an hour isn't much, but it's a **** of a lot better than 4 dollars a day (a 10 hour day)

    Leave a comment:

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