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  • #16
    Yes,

    How good is her health?

    Comment


    • #17
      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jeanine:
      Come to think of it: suppose the woman agreed on moving to the US, and suppose she even got her stamp in her passport (not the plastic card though). Could she start filing for I-130 for her children (who are unmarried but older than 21 years of age?) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

      It appears she could based on the rules, Jeanine.

      Comment


      • #18
        Hey ProudUSC,

        I'm sorry, but I'm not sure I got what you just meant above. Can you explain it. Thank you and sorry for asking all the time! Take care!
        Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

        Comment


        • #19
          <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Could she start filing for I-130 for her children (who are unmarried but older than 21 years of age?) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

          I was answering your question. If she gets her green card, she should be able to petition for her unmarried over 21 year-old children (as stated below):


          If you are a lawful permanent resident, you may petition for the following foreign national relatives to immigrate to the United States. You must be able to provide proof of these relationships.


          Husband or wife
          Unmarried son or daughter of any age

          Comment


          • #20
            Dear ProudUSC:

            Thank you for your answer, but I'm just not sure that when someone gets the stamp in the passport, but not the actual plastic card yet, is that still mean they can petition already for their husband/wife, unmar. children of any age, or first she should wait till she gets her plastic card and THEN petition. Or by getting the stamp in her passport, that means she is already a LPR and just go and petition? Sorry, for always nagging you with questions that are probably pretty obvious. And thank you very much for being patient and replying. God bless you as well, and of course everyone else!
            Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

            Comment


            • #21
              Anyone else can reply to this, if ProudUSC doesn't know, or not around. Thanks!
              Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

              Comment


              • #22
                She could only petition for her child once she is an LPR, which means she has to have a plastic card.
                -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                God Bless America - God Bless Immigrants - God Bless Poor Misguided Souls Too

                National Domestic Violence Hotline:
                1.800.799.SAFE (7233) 1.800.787.

                Comment


                • #23
                  She would be coming to the US on a visa, which is usually stamped in her passport.
                  Then she would apply for change of status to permanent residency, to which she will then get the Green card (plasic card).
                  After so many years (depending on her status) she then can apply for Citzenship.

                  One important thing I must mention, like someone said above, if she implies to any Immigration offical even before she moves over to the US that she has no intention of staying here, she could be turned down straight away because of that reason.
                  Of course that applies for petitions for an alien relative.
                  -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  God Bless America - God Bless Immigrants - God Bless Poor Misguided Souls Too

                  National Domestic Violence Hotline:
                  1.800.799.SAFE (7233) 1.800.787.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Davdah and all the others!!

                    Thank you for your responses. As far as I know, yes, she wants her kids to live in the US, she doesn't herself dreams of living in the US. But since she knows she's better say she has the intention of staying, otherwise she would be turned down. Now, she knows that the best is when she already has the actual card in her hand and then petition for her kids, but she heard it somewhere (and she wants to be sure of its vitiousness) that once she gets the stamp in her passport that says something as "I-155 work and live authorization approved" that she can already start the petition so it would be a bit faster than waiting for the actual card first and then petition. Her USC child is not 21 yet, only the two others are over 21, but they're still unmarried. Which one would be sooner as of thinking the application process? The mother is now willing to move to the US, but just wants to know if she can already petition once she got the stamp in her passport or only after the card has arrived? Because someone said to her that as soon as she gets the stamp in her passport then she's already in LPR status even though, the card would arrive later on by mail. Well, thank you for your further responses, I really appreciate it! Take care all!
                    Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      This is what I've found over the internet, just right now, anyone can tell if this is true?

                      1. petitioner fills out form I-130
                      2. if approved, letter will be sent to petitioner as well as the the US Embassy (if the beneficary lives abroad)
                      3. form I-797 to fill out, and do all the other stuff they ask (medical papers etc.)
                      4. form I-485 fill out: AOS to permanent residence
                      5. get stamp in passport, later the card
                      6. local office fills out I-181 and stamps "temporary evidence of I-1551
                      This means you're a LPR from now on

                      --------------------------------------------

                      So then I assume that once someone gets the stamp in their passport they are already considered LPR, and can petition, can't they? Please, if this is not correct, let me know. I guess this is what the woman might have heard from someone. Thank you for your patience! God bless you all!
                      Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Jeanine,

                        Im a bit confused, the under 21 child is a USC. Who sponsored him/her?
                        You said that the woman lived her entire life outside of the US, so I am figuring out that the USC child was not born here.
                        Sorry not wanting to get into all details, but its a bit confusing.

                        How old is the under 21 child now?
                        I am wondering whether it would be quicker and easier to wait until they are of age to sponsor their mother.
                        The woman's father, he must be probably at least 80 yrs old now, would he be able to financially sponsor his daughter?

                        Its not just about who can come here via relatives, its also about whether the person sponsoring meet the financial levels to petition the alien.

                        If this is all about having her children having an opportunity to immigrate to the US, and she doesn't want to live here really, then it would be best for the USC child to wait to sponsor his/her siblings when she/he is of age. And of course can financially sponsor them.


                        I don't know what you mean about a stamp in the passport...I have not heard that one before sorry. I only know of a visa and alike in the passport. Maybe someone else can explain the stamp in passport.
                        LPR usually means you get a plastic card whether with conditions or without them (10yr).
                        I would have thought you would need the card as proof to send to USCIS when you sponsor someone anyway.
                        -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        God Bless America - God Bless Immigrants - God Bless Poor Misguided Souls Too

                        National Domestic Violence Hotline:
                        1.800.799.SAFE (7233) 1.800.787.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Sprintgirl,

                          The woman is about 60 years old now, andher family (her father and sisters and a deceased mother) all were and are USC, except the woman herself. The woman's USC kid was born in the US because the woman did travel a lot to the US to see her family and gave birth there for her third kid. The two older ones are over 21 now and were born outside of US. I don't know how old is the USC kid, but even if the kid was near to 21, she or he would probably never or at least not in the short time would be able to sponsor his or her sisters/brothers as a USC, so that's out of the picture, and that's why the woman (as a mother) would like to help her older than 21 years old children. The woman would get LPR thru her own father (who is the grandfather of the children) and then she plans to help her children to go to US. I never heard of the stamp before either, only from this woman, and then from this article that I wrote in above. Thank you for your reply and if you have any new idea or thoughts, glad if you share it! Take care!
                          Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jeanine:
                            This is what I've found over the internet, just right now, anyone can tell if this is true?

                            1. petitioner fills out form I-130
                            2. if approved, letter will be sent to petitioner as well as the the US Embassy (if the beneficary lives abroad)
                            3. form I-797 to fill out, and do all the other stuff they ask (medical papers etc.)
                            4. form I-485 fill out: AOS to permanent residence
                            5. get stamp in passport, later the card
                            6. local office fills out I-181 and stamps "temporary evidence of I-1551
                            This means you're a LPR from now on

                            --------------------------------------------

                            So then I assume that once someone gets the stamp in their passport they are already considered LPR, and can petition, can't they? Please, if this is not correct, let me know. I guess this is what the woman might have heard from someone. Thank you for your patience! God bless you all! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                            Yes, when one gets I-151 stamp in the passport, it is the same as having GC. However, if she is petitioned for an immigrant visa by her father (the only way in this case), she wouldn't go through AOS (form I-485). She would become PR when she arrives into the USA, and will receive GC in the mail a few weeks later.

                            Most USCIS offices don't stamp passports any more anyway.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Aneri,

                              yes, you're correct she would not need to file the form I-485. But she would still need a stamp in her passport, or some sort of paper that would let her IN the States because she wouldn't get her card right away. And where would her card arrive? To the address that was given on the I-130 form as "address where beneficary intends to live" or where it is asking for the beneficary's address (which can be an address abroad as it even says on this form)? Just because if she stayed in her overseas address waiting for the card to arrive which will then turns out that will arrive to the US address then she can wait for years if not decades. But if she would get it on her overseas address, then she wouldn't need a stamp anyway to enter US, because then she would just sit at home, having her hands on her lap and just wait, and wait till she gets the card. So, if they don't stamp her passport then what is the EXACT point when she could start her petition (before the actual card that arrives)?:/ A bit confusing....I guess....lemme know if you didn't catch something.....typing too fast and too lazy to read over my comment. Thank you for your answer tho!
                              Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                doesn't work that way:...after the interview at the consulate in her home country (based on approved I-130), she receives an immigrant visa. When she enters the USA with that immigrant visa, she becomes PR. As a part of inspection at POE, immigrant officer orders the GC that will be sent to the USA address.

                                Before one can act as a sponsor, he/she has to have a domicile in the USA.

                                Comment

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