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  • Traveling abroad while processing citizenship

    Is it possible to travel abroad after filling for naturalization? is a re-entry permit needed?

  • #2
    Is it possible to travel abroad after filling for naturalization? is a re-entry permit needed?

    Comment


    • #3
      If you are adjusting your status, the advanced parole, form I-131 form would need to be filed. It should not cause a problem if you are traveling based on family, business, or even personal. However, the travel abroad needs to be temporary, ie a clear indication to return back to the states for instance. The processing time for the I-131 is from 2 to 4 months, but you can get it expedited based on your emergency needs. Look at the instructions for more details, but I think you need to make an appoitment with a USCIS immigration officer.
      "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

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      • #4
        Hudson - doesn't "to travel abroad after filling for naturalization" suggest that the person already has GC?

        I don't see a problem in traveling as long as it is not a long stay abroad and the person will return for the interview.

        A re-entry permit is needed if one plans to stay outside the US for over a year.

        Comment


        • #5
          When my wife and I had to go back to her home country (2 years ago), we were advised by USCIS to file form I-131 b/c immigration might deny her entry. I too found it odd, but filed anyway.
          "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

          Comment


          • #6
            I already have a greencard and a valid foreign passport. My problem is that I want to go to my sister's wedding in July (in Venezuela), and I wonder if I should wait until after I get back to file for naturalization. Will it be a problem to get back to the US? Someone told me that if you travel, you have to start all over again.
            Thanks for your input

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            • #7
              That someone is wrong then. As long as your LPR status is valid, you won't lose it just because you're travelling overseas. The CBP officer might deny you entry for god-know-what reason, but thats a very extreme and rare cases.

              Comment


              • #8
                I already have a greencard and a valid foreign passport. My problem is that I want to go to my sister's wedding in July (in Venezuela), and I wonder if I should wait until after I get back to file for naturalization. Will it be a problem to get back to the US? Someone told me that if you travel, you have to start all over again.
                Thanks for your input
                It should not be a problem technically if you have a re-entry permit to cover any foulups that Customs may have. If they ask, just tell them you were at your sister's wedding.
                "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                Comment


                • #9
                  That someone is wrong then. As long as your LPR status is valid, you won't lose it just because you're travelling overseas. The CBP officer might deny you entry for god-know-what reason, but thats a very extreme and rare cases.
                  From what I been told by various sources, there are 2 laws conflicting. The older law which states you do not need a travel permit and the new law that requires all non-citizens to obtain the travel permit for purposes other than immigration. I have not found the specific regulations, but I am still looking.
                  "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    slyrub,
                    I would strongly suggest you get the information packet from USCIS on naturalization.
                    "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hudson, are you implying that there's a law out there stating that LPR is now required to obtain AP first before travelling overseas?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hudson, are you implying that there's a law out there stating that LPR is now required to obtain AP first before travelling overseas?
                        When my wife had to get the travel document after she got her green card because we were traveling to her home country, the USCIS CSR stated this to me as well as some of my friends who work for USCIS. I still have not found the law they are referring to since they were speaking in generality. When my wife and I were waiting for the final adjudication process, we did not travel. We brought family here. This was done so that we do not file for the I-131. Now, when my wife got the card and we decided to travel, that is whan I called USCIS to see if there was anything else. They told me that even though she was approved and had the card, the document was still required. This was 2 years ago. I have checked the proceedures and the web site states the I-131 must still be filed if you want to travel whether you have the green card or not.
                        "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          NOTE: when I am referring to the travelers document, I am referring to the re-entry permit which is filed from form I-131. Under the How do I section of USCIS with respect to permenant resident, there is information on getting a re-entry permit if traveling overseas.
                          "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Let's get real guys...you do not need any kind of advance parole if you are approved and even don't have a greencard in your hand. All you need is the stamp in your passport saying that you are approved for I-551. I have done that in past. You only need the parole if and only if you are staying more than 6 months as LPR. I have travelled few weeks ago while my N-400 was pending. Guess, what after I left the country, I got my interview letter here. I came back and no one stopped me for nothing.
                            If I were you, I would apply for citizenship now and July if too far. You may have your fingerprints taken and even the interview. It also depends how long you will be outside and how long it takes for you to come back if you have to rush for interview.

                            Just apply and plan the trip....

                            ChiChi

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              hm.. so, USCIS says the GC holder needs travel document in order to return to the US even if the trip is for a few weeks? Well that same USCIS informed many AOS applicants that they don't need any kind of special document to return to the US. Those people found themselves sent back to the country they just visited (in some cases not even their home contry). So much about a good advice...

                              From the I-131 form itself
                              "If you stay outside the United States for less than one
                              year, you are not required to apply for a reentry permit.
                              You may reenter the United States on your Permanent
                              Resident Card (Form I-551)."

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