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  • Gov. Mark WARNER, VA: FORWARD TOGETHER!

    Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Virginia and is the current Democratic Governor of Virginia. In the final months of his gubernatorial term, Warner's poll ratings indicate that he is the most popular Virginia governor in a generation, with record approval ratings of nearly 75 percent.

    Warner is considered one of the top contenders for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in 2008 because of his wide appeal to independents and moderate Republicans, and his high popularity in a relatively Republican state. Some have compared him to Bill Clinton, another moderate Southern Democratic governor who had strong appeal to moderates and independents. In November 2005, Time magazine named Warner one of the "five best governors" in the United States.



    Early life and career
    Warner was born in Indianapolis, Indiana and was raised in Vernon, Connecticut where he graduated from Rockville High School. He attended George Washington University and in 1977 became the first person in his family to graduate from college. Warner went on to graduate from Harvard Law School in 1980.

    In the early 1980s, Warner served as a Senate staff member. He used his knowledge of federal telecommunications policies as a broker of cellular phone franchise licenses, making a large fortune. As managing director of Columbia Capital Corporation he helped found or was an early investor in a number of technology companies. He co-founded Nextel, as well as Capital Cellular Corporation, and built up an estimated fortune of over $200 million. Around the same time, he married Lisa Collis. The couple has three daughters, Madison, Gillian, and Eliza.

    Warner involved himself in public efforts related to health care, telecommunications, information technology, and education. He managed Virginia Governor Douglas Wilder's successful 1989 gubernatorial campaign, served as state chairman of the state Democratic Party and ultimately made his own bid for public office, unsuccessfully running for the Senate in 1996 against Republican Senator John Warner (no relation) in a "Warner vs. Warner" election. John Warner was unpopular in rural Virginia for opposing the 1994 Senate candidacy of controversial right-wing Republican Oliver North, and Mark Warner seized on this to perform impressively in the state's rural areas.


    Governor of Virginia
    In 2001, Warner campaigned for Governor as a moderate Democrat after years of slowly building up a power base in rural Virginia. He defeated the Republican candidate, then-State Attorney General Mark Earley, by a margin of almost 100,000 votes. In the same election, Republican Jerry Kilgore was elected Attorney General, and Democrat Tim Kaine was elected Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. Although Virginians rejected Warner's bid to raise the sales tax in 2002, state revenue has increased significantly from $19 billion in Fiscal Year 1999 to nearly $30 billion in Fiscal Year 2005. Warner worked with moderate Republican legislators to reform the tax code, lowering food and income taxes, and increasing the sales and cigarette taxes in 2004. He is a former chairman of the National Governors Association and the Southern Governors' Association.
    Warner's popularity paid off for the Democrats when, in 2003 and again in 2005, the party made a net gain in the Virginia House of Delegates for the first time in generations (although the House remained under Republican control.) He succeeded in passing a tax bill to improve the state's financial balance sheet. He won the support of several key Republican legislators and the Virginia Chamber of Commerce for the proposal, although the effort also led to an attack ad campaign from conservative seniors who opposed raising taxes. Warner has also made a major push to reform high school to offer more college credit or technical training options. He has encountered some criticism for being too low-key and not leading on hot button issues, but maintains he is trying to avoid unproductive posturing and partisanship.

    In January 2005, after a two-year study, the Government Performance Project, in conjunction with Governing magazine and the Pew Charitable Trust, ranked the states in four management categories: money, people, infrastructure, and information. Virginia and Utah tied with an A- overall, but Virginia got A's across the board, prompting Warner to dub Virginia "the best managed state in the nation."

    Kaine and Kilgore both sought to succeed Warner as Governor of Virginia. (The Virginia Constitution forbids any Governor from serving consecutive terms, so Warner could not have run for a second term in 2005.) On November 8, 2005, Kaine, the former Mayor of Richmond, won with 52 percent of the vote. Kilgore, who had resigned as Attorney General in February 2005 to campaign full-time, and who had previously served as Virginia Secretary of Public Safety, received 46 percent of the vote. Russ Potts, a Republican State Senator, also ran for Governor as an independent, receiving 2 percent of the vote. Warner had supported and campaigned for Kaine, and many national pundits considered Kaine's victory to be further evidence of Warner's political clout in Virginia, as well as a signal of his viability as a presidential candidate.

    On November 29, 2005, as is his prerogative as governor, Warner commuted the death sentence of Robin Lovitt to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole. Lovitt was convicted of murdering Clayton ****s at an Arlington pool hall in 1999. After his trial in 2001, a court clerk illegally destroyed evidence that was used against Lovitt during his trial, but that could have exonerated him upon further DNA testing. Just a few weeks earlier, Virginia implemented a law requiring the preservation of DNA evidence in death row cases. Lovitt's death sentence would have been the 1,000th carried out in the United States since the Supreme Court reinstated capital punishment as permissible under the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution in 1976. In a statement, Warner said, "The actions of an agent of the commonwealth, in a manner contrary to the express direction of the law, comes at the expense of a defendant facing society's most severe and final sanction." Warner has denied clemency in 11 other cases that have come before him as governor.


    Future political career.
    Warner's home-state popularity is high, polling in the final year of his term with an 80% approval rating from Mason-Dixon Political Media Research, published in newspapers statewide. According to Mason-Dixon pollster Brad Coker, that gives Warner the highest approval rating for an outgoing governor in the firm's two-decade history.

    Warner is considered to be a potential Presidential candidate in 2008, as Virginia limits its governors to a single consecutive term in office. After John Kerry's 2004 presidential election defeat, Warner has been regarded by some Democrats as a Clinton-like figure around whom the party could rally in the 2008 election. His business experience, Southern base, fundraising connections within high-tech and venture capital circles, and record of working with black leaders add up to what some see as an attractive political résumé.

    Having served only one term as an elected official, however, Warner may be considered too inexperienced to move to the Presidency; the same point was raised about John Edwards' one Senate term. If he did run for president in 2008, his first test might be a comparison with several others, possibly including Evan Bayh, John Edwards, John Kerry, and/or Tom Vilsack, who would vie for support from moderate Democratic voters seeking a fresh voice.

    DemStore, a website that manufactures official and unofficial campaign paraphernalia for Democratic office-seekers (including the 2004 presidential campaigns of Howard Dean, **** Gephardt, and Wesley Clark), has already begun manufacturing "Warner for President" buttons and ***per stickers. It is not clear, however, if their services have been retained by Warner, by his emissaries, or by some sort of "Draft Warner" movement similar to that which surrounded Clark.

    On June 10, 2005, Warner hired Monica Dixon, a former top-political aide to 2000 Democratic presidential nominee Al Gore, and also formed a political action committee which has been dubbed "Forward Together." Both of these actions could be indicative of a run for the presidency in 2008. On August 29, 2005, Warner announced that he would not challenge George Allen for his Senate seat in 2006, even though a poll commissioned by the Roanoke Times and other papers across Virginia had recently shown that voters would prefer Warner in a head-to-head matchup with Allen. [1] If not elected President, Virginia law would not bar Warner from running for Governor again in 2009 – the law only prevents consecutive terms. Warner would have been likely to pursue Virginia's second Senate seat in 2008 if John Warner had decided to retire (the elder Warner has indicated he will stay on.)

    According to the Washington Post, "one of the Democratic Party's most experienced Internet specialists formally signed on" with Warner's Forward Together PAC. Jerome Armstrong, who "served as a key member of Howard Dean's Internet team in 2004, will be Warner's Internet Director." [2]

    On December 6th, 2005, Warner held the kickoff gala of his Forward Together PAC in Virginia, where he raised over $2.5 million dollars. In attendence were Governor-elect Tim Kaine, and former Senator John Breaux.

    Following the Forward Together PAC Gala, Warner headed down to South Carolina for the Democratic Dinner honoring South Carolina's four Democratic Governors where he impressed South Carolina Democrats. Warner was also the guest speaker at the Florida Democratic Party Conference on the weekend of December 9.

  • #2
    Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Virginia and is the current Democratic Governor of Virginia. In the final months of his gubernatorial term, Warner's poll ratings indicate that he is the most popular Virginia governor in a generation, with record approval ratings of nearly 75 percent.

    Warner is considered one of the top contenders for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in 2008 because of his wide appeal to independents and moderate Republicans, and his high popularity in a relatively Republican state. Some have compared him to Bill Clinton, another moderate Southern Democratic governor who had strong appeal to moderates and independents. In November 2005, Time magazine named Warner one of the "five best governors" in the United States.



    Early life and career
    Warner was born in Indianapolis, Indiana and was raised in Vernon, Connecticut where he graduated from Rockville High School. He attended George Washington University and in 1977 became the first person in his family to graduate from college. Warner went on to graduate from Harvard Law School in 1980.

    In the early 1980s, Warner served as a Senate staff member. He used his knowledge of federal telecommunications policies as a broker of cellular phone franchise licenses, making a large fortune. As managing director of Columbia Capital Corporation he helped found or was an early investor in a number of technology companies. He co-founded Nextel, as well as Capital Cellular Corporation, and built up an estimated fortune of over $200 million. Around the same time, he married Lisa Collis. The couple has three daughters, Madison, Gillian, and Eliza.

    Warner involved himself in public efforts related to health care, telecommunications, information technology, and education. He managed Virginia Governor Douglas Wilder's successful 1989 gubernatorial campaign, served as state chairman of the state Democratic Party and ultimately made his own bid for public office, unsuccessfully running for the Senate in 1996 against Republican Senator John Warner (no relation) in a "Warner vs. Warner" election. John Warner was unpopular in rural Virginia for opposing the 1994 Senate candidacy of controversial right-wing Republican Oliver North, and Mark Warner seized on this to perform impressively in the state's rural areas.


    Governor of Virginia
    In 2001, Warner campaigned for Governor as a moderate Democrat after years of slowly building up a power base in rural Virginia. He defeated the Republican candidate, then-State Attorney General Mark Earley, by a margin of almost 100,000 votes. In the same election, Republican Jerry Kilgore was elected Attorney General, and Democrat Tim Kaine was elected Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. Although Virginians rejected Warner's bid to raise the sales tax in 2002, state revenue has increased significantly from $19 billion in Fiscal Year 1999 to nearly $30 billion in Fiscal Year 2005. Warner worked with moderate Republican legislators to reform the tax code, lowering food and income taxes, and increasing the sales and cigarette taxes in 2004. He is a former chairman of the National Governors Association and the Southern Governors' Association.
    Warner's popularity paid off for the Democrats when, in 2003 and again in 2005, the party made a net gain in the Virginia House of Delegates for the first time in generations (although the House remained under Republican control.) He succeeded in passing a tax bill to improve the state's financial balance sheet. He won the support of several key Republican legislators and the Virginia Chamber of Commerce for the proposal, although the effort also led to an attack ad campaign from conservative seniors who opposed raising taxes. Warner has also made a major push to reform high school to offer more college credit or technical training options. He has encountered some criticism for being too low-key and not leading on hot button issues, but maintains he is trying to avoid unproductive posturing and partisanship.

    In January 2005, after a two-year study, the Government Performance Project, in conjunction with Governing magazine and the Pew Charitable Trust, ranked the states in four management categories: money, people, infrastructure, and information. Virginia and Utah tied with an A- overall, but Virginia got A's across the board, prompting Warner to dub Virginia "the best managed state in the nation."

    Kaine and Kilgore both sought to succeed Warner as Governor of Virginia. (The Virginia Constitution forbids any Governor from serving consecutive terms, so Warner could not have run for a second term in 2005.) On November 8, 2005, Kaine, the former Mayor of Richmond, won with 52 percent of the vote. Kilgore, who had resigned as Attorney General in February 2005 to campaign full-time, and who had previously served as Virginia Secretary of Public Safety, received 46 percent of the vote. Russ Potts, a Republican State Senator, also ran for Governor as an independent, receiving 2 percent of the vote. Warner had supported and campaigned for Kaine, and many national pundits considered Kaine's victory to be further evidence of Warner's political clout in Virginia, as well as a signal of his viability as a presidential candidate.

    On November 29, 2005, as is his prerogative as governor, Warner commuted the death sentence of Robin Lovitt to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole. Lovitt was convicted of murdering Clayton ****s at an Arlington pool hall in 1999. After his trial in 2001, a court clerk illegally destroyed evidence that was used against Lovitt during his trial, but that could have exonerated him upon further DNA testing. Just a few weeks earlier, Virginia implemented a law requiring the preservation of DNA evidence in death row cases. Lovitt's death sentence would have been the 1,000th carried out in the United States since the Supreme Court reinstated capital punishment as permissible under the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution in 1976. In a statement, Warner said, "The actions of an agent of the commonwealth, in a manner contrary to the express direction of the law, comes at the expense of a defendant facing society's most severe and final sanction." Warner has denied clemency in 11 other cases that have come before him as governor.


    Future political career.
    Warner's home-state popularity is high, polling in the final year of his term with an 80% approval rating from Mason-Dixon Political Media Research, published in newspapers statewide. According to Mason-Dixon pollster Brad Coker, that gives Warner the highest approval rating for an outgoing governor in the firm's two-decade history.

    Warner is considered to be a potential Presidential candidate in 2008, as Virginia limits its governors to a single consecutive term in office. After John Kerry's 2004 presidential election defeat, Warner has been regarded by some Democrats as a Clinton-like figure around whom the party could rally in the 2008 election. His business experience, Southern base, fundraising connections within high-tech and venture capital circles, and record of working with black leaders add up to what some see as an attractive political résumé.

    Having served only one term as an elected official, however, Warner may be considered too inexperienced to move to the Presidency; the same point was raised about John Edwards' one Senate term. If he did run for president in 2008, his first test might be a comparison with several others, possibly including Evan Bayh, John Edwards, John Kerry, and/or Tom Vilsack, who would vie for support from moderate Democratic voters seeking a fresh voice.

    DemStore, a website that manufactures official and unofficial campaign paraphernalia for Democratic office-seekers (including the 2004 presidential campaigns of Howard Dean, **** Gephardt, and Wesley Clark), has already begun manufacturing "Warner for President" buttons and ***per stickers. It is not clear, however, if their services have been retained by Warner, by his emissaries, or by some sort of "Draft Warner" movement similar to that which surrounded Clark.

    On June 10, 2005, Warner hired Monica Dixon, a former top-political aide to 2000 Democratic presidential nominee Al Gore, and also formed a political action committee which has been dubbed "Forward Together." Both of these actions could be indicative of a run for the presidency in 2008. On August 29, 2005, Warner announced that he would not challenge George Allen for his Senate seat in 2006, even though a poll commissioned by the Roanoke Times and other papers across Virginia had recently shown that voters would prefer Warner in a head-to-head matchup with Allen. [1] If not elected President, Virginia law would not bar Warner from running for Governor again in 2009 – the law only prevents consecutive terms. Warner would have been likely to pursue Virginia's second Senate seat in 2008 if John Warner had decided to retire (the elder Warner has indicated he will stay on.)

    According to the Washington Post, "one of the Democratic Party's most experienced Internet specialists formally signed on" with Warner's Forward Together PAC. Jerome Armstrong, who "served as a key member of Howard Dean's Internet team in 2004, will be Warner's Internet Director." [2]

    On December 6th, 2005, Warner held the kickoff gala of his Forward Together PAC in Virginia, where he raised over $2.5 million dollars. In attendence were Governor-elect Tim Kaine, and former Senator John Breaux.

    Following the Forward Together PAC Gala, Warner headed down to South Carolina for the Democratic Dinner honoring South Carolina's four Democratic Governors where he impressed South Carolina Democrats. Warner was also the guest speaker at the Florida Democratic Party Conference on the weekend of December 9.

    Comment


    • #3
      RUDY GIULIANI WILL BE OUR NEXT PRESIDENT AND WILL KICK TERRORIST B U T T !!!!

      Comment


      • #4
        UNITED WE STAND,
        DIVIDED WE WILL FALL!

        -----------------------


        Should Mark Warner become a President, I am sure no terrorist will withstand THE UNITED FRONT of AMERICANS!

        Comment


        • #5
          I would vote for Mark Warner! Hes a nice man I have met him on several occasions and is not your typical politician.

          Comment

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