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  • HISPANICS BECOME UNKNOWN SOLDIERS IN WWII

    UNION-TRIBUNE
    May 2, 2007
    Ruben Navarrette

    ERASED FROM HISTORY

    Discrimination takes many forms. It's not just the denying of opportunity, it can also be the denying of history.

    That is what's happening at the Public Broadcasting Service, which is preparing to release a lengthy documentary on World War II that ignores the contribution of Latinos to the war effort. PBS has acknowledged the omission but has also refused to take any meaningful steps to correct it. The same goes for respected filmmaker Ken Burns, producer of the 14 1/2-hour epic, "The War."

    Talk about a blind spot. Latinos take tremendous pride in their military service to the United States, which dates back at least to the Civil War and that has produced more Medal of Honor recipients as a percentage of the population than any other ethnic group. Latinos are especially proud of their stint in World War II, which helped spark the Latino civil rights movement of the 1960s. That generation fought in Europe and the Pacific, then returned home to fight for fairness and respect.

    It's a great and wonderfully patriotic story, and it's a shame that Burns and his associates at PBS missed it.

    One person who hasn't missed it is Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez, a journalism professor at the University of Texas at Austin who has spent the last eight years attempting to document the Latino experience in World War II. As part of her U.S. Latino & Latina World War II **** History Project, Rivas-Rodriguez and her colleagues have interviewed 550 Latino World War II veterans and put together a database of hundreds of individuals and thousands of photographs. Much of it is reported in the book "A Legacy Greater Than Words."

    For Rivas-Rodriguez, the dispute with PBS is not about political correctness. It's about keeping history honest.

    "The Latino experience was very important because of what was going on before World War II," she told me. "Throughout the Southwest and the Midwest, we had segregated schools and public institutions. We had Medal of Honor winners who came back home and were denied service in restaurants because they were Mexican. That is a very unique and important story that needs to be part of any historical account."

    The Burns film includes African-Americans and Japanese-Americans. But in addition to skipping the contributions of Latinos, it also bypasses Native Americans, which is shocking because one of the more compelling stories of World War II is that of the Navajo code talkers. According to Rivas-Rodriguez, other good stories include those of segregated units made up entirely of Puerto Ricans and "de facto Spanish-speaking units" of recruits from rural towns in New Mexico who were thrown together so they could communicate with one another and stand a better chance of surviving combat.

    Rivas-Rodriguez & Co. wrote a letter to PBS, but the concerns were dismissed. They wrote more letters, eventually getting invited to a meeting in Washington, where they were dismissed again. They then launched an e-mail campaign. Soon, PBS was hearing from the American GI Forum, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and others. This controversy wasn't going away, and neither were Rivas-Rodriguez and her growing army of supporters.

    Last month, PBS seemed to give in a nudge when officials announced they had hired a Latino documentary filmmaker to work with Burns to incorporate into the film new material that would highlight contributions by Latinos and Native Americans. However, a day later a panicked PBS tried to clarify that it never meant to suggest that the film would be re-cut, or re-edited, and new material "seamlessly" added to the film – as a PBS spokesman had told The Washington Post a day earlier. Instead, PBS programming chief John Wilson told the Post that the new footage would become part of "the same contiguous experience" of the documentary, but the film would not be re-cut.

    Translation: Whatever they come up with is going to be an addendum to the finished product.

    Not good enough, said Rivas-Rodriguez.

    "We're not asking for any favors," she said. "This is what we deserve as Americans because of what our people have given to this country."

    She's right. PBS has added insult to insult and bungled this whole affair, just as surely as Burns seems to have bungled the telling of an important story. Both parties should make it right, and there's only one way to do that. Re-edit this film, and tell this history the way it really happened.

  • #2
    UNION-TRIBUNE
    May 2, 2007
    Ruben Navarrette

    ERASED FROM HISTORY

    Discrimination takes many forms. It's not just the denying of opportunity, it can also be the denying of history.

    That is what's happening at the Public Broadcasting Service, which is preparing to release a lengthy documentary on World War II that ignores the contribution of Latinos to the war effort. PBS has acknowledged the omission but has also refused to take any meaningful steps to correct it. The same goes for respected filmmaker Ken Burns, producer of the 14 1/2-hour epic, "The War."

    Talk about a blind spot. Latinos take tremendous pride in their military service to the United States, which dates back at least to the Civil War and that has produced more Medal of Honor recipients as a percentage of the population than any other ethnic group. Latinos are especially proud of their stint in World War II, which helped spark the Latino civil rights movement of the 1960s. That generation fought in Europe and the Pacific, then returned home to fight for fairness and respect.

    It's a great and wonderfully patriotic story, and it's a shame that Burns and his associates at PBS missed it.

    One person who hasn't missed it is Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez, a journalism professor at the University of Texas at Austin who has spent the last eight years attempting to document the Latino experience in World War II. As part of her U.S. Latino & Latina World War II **** History Project, Rivas-Rodriguez and her colleagues have interviewed 550 Latino World War II veterans and put together a database of hundreds of individuals and thousands of photographs. Much of it is reported in the book "A Legacy Greater Than Words."

    For Rivas-Rodriguez, the dispute with PBS is not about political correctness. It's about keeping history honest.

    "The Latino experience was very important because of what was going on before World War II," she told me. "Throughout the Southwest and the Midwest, we had segregated schools and public institutions. We had Medal of Honor winners who came back home and were denied service in restaurants because they were Mexican. That is a very unique and important story that needs to be part of any historical account."

    The Burns film includes African-Americans and Japanese-Americans. But in addition to skipping the contributions of Latinos, it also bypasses Native Americans, which is shocking because one of the more compelling stories of World War II is that of the Navajo code talkers. According to Rivas-Rodriguez, other good stories include those of segregated units made up entirely of Puerto Ricans and "de facto Spanish-speaking units" of recruits from rural towns in New Mexico who were thrown together so they could communicate with one another and stand a better chance of surviving combat.

    Rivas-Rodriguez & Co. wrote a letter to PBS, but the concerns were dismissed. They wrote more letters, eventually getting invited to a meeting in Washington, where they were dismissed again. They then launched an e-mail campaign. Soon, PBS was hearing from the American GI Forum, the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and others. This controversy wasn't going away, and neither were Rivas-Rodriguez and her growing army of supporters.

    Last month, PBS seemed to give in a nudge when officials announced they had hired a Latino documentary filmmaker to work with Burns to incorporate into the film new material that would highlight contributions by Latinos and Native Americans. However, a day later a panicked PBS tried to clarify that it never meant to suggest that the film would be re-cut, or re-edited, and new material "seamlessly" added to the film – as a PBS spokesman had told The Washington Post a day earlier. Instead, PBS programming chief John Wilson told the Post that the new footage would become part of "the same contiguous experience" of the documentary, but the film would not be re-cut.

    Translation: Whatever they come up with is going to be an addendum to the finished product.

    Not good enough, said Rivas-Rodriguez.

    "We're not asking for any favors," she said. "This is what we deserve as Americans because of what our people have given to this country."

    She's right. PBS has added insult to insult and bungled this whole affair, just as surely as Burns seems to have bungled the telling of an important story. Both parties should make it right, and there's only one way to do that. Re-edit this film, and tell this history the way it really happened.

    Comment


    • #3
      Friday, May 11, 2007
      Albuquerque Journal

      Latinos, Ken Burns Settle 'The War'


      The American GI Forum, the Hispanic Association of Corporate Responsibility and Florentine Films reached an understanding Wednesday on PBS' upcoming World War II documentary.
      The agreement recognizes Latino concerns about "The War," the upcoming 14-hour documentary series directed by longtime filmmaker Ken Burns. It had not included any Hispanic war stories.
      The groups announced Thursday that the narratives and voices of Hispanic World War II veterans will now be incorporated into Burns' film.
      However, the agreement, the groups say, also equally recognizes that the artistic decisions of what appears in Burns' film are his and his alone to make.
      The documentary, due to air on PBS in September during Hispanic Heritage Month, tells the story of the war from the perspective of veterans from four American towns.
      American GI Forum members from throughout the country, including the group's New Mexico Chairman Juan José Peña and Albuquerque Chairman Louis P. Tel***, testified before Congress two weeks ago about their concerns that Hispanics were excluded from the documentary.
      Burns said in a recent news release that he has collected interviews with Latino veterans that he considers very powerful and agreed to include their on-camera testimony, personal archives and combat experiences into "The War."

      Hall of Famers
      Girl Scouts of Chaparral Council announced Saturday seven recipients for its 2007 Hall of Fame, honoring women in science, technology, and engineering professions.
      Among this year's recipients are Edie Cherry of Cherry/See/Reames Architects; Deidre A. Hirschfeld, Ph.D., New Mexico Tech University; Ruby D. Lathon, Engineering Management and Technology; and Chris Morgan of Sandia National Laboratories.
      Other award recipients are Dr. Irene E. Ortiz of the University of New Mexico Albuquerque Veterans Administration Medical Center; Bobbie Williams of Sandia National Laboratories; and Cheryl L. Willman, M.D., of UNM Cancer Research and Treatment Center.
      This year's event, which raises funds through a dinner, will benefit the council's science, technology, and engineering programs for girls in New Mexico and southwestern Colorado.

      Register now
      The second annual New Mexico Women Veterans Conference will take place from 7:30 a.m to 5 p.m. June 13 at Hotel Albuquerque, 800 Rio Grande Blvd NW.
      The event is being organized by the state Department of Veterans Services, the New Mexico Commission on the Status of Women, the New Mexico Coalition Against Domestic Violence, the New Mexico Office of African American Affairs and the New Mexico Indian Affairs Department.
      Registration is $25 and will be open through June 6. Registration forms are online at http://nmveterans.org. For more information, call 827-6635 or 222-6600.

      Comment


      • #4
        I am so tired of hearing from these sniveling cry babies whining about discrimination. Wake up. EVERYONE, including us "gringos", face discrimination. The difference between a WINNERS like us and LOSERS like you is that we don't let something that happened 65 years ago or 6 minutes ago hold us back. Hey, if I don't get good service at a restaurant, I don't picket and protest, I go to a better restaurant ! I do not waste my time trying to get OTHER people to change; I focus on changing myself to make myself happy. I am responsible for my own happiness and I do not blame others for my failures. I take ownership in my actions. I expect there to be discrimination and so what? I see lots of opportunities there. People that stupid get their own punishment in lost business and loss self respect. Two Mexicans felt discriminated whenever they went to McDonalds or other fast food restaurants. One sat there and cried; the other opened up the Taco Bell food chain. You decide your fate, not others. So stop whining and complaining and expecting others to change for you when you are too weak to change yourself. Grow up man.

        Comment


        • #5
          And I´m so tired of seeing these homosexuals like you complaining all the time about illegal aliens in this forum, ovbiously an immigrant sexually abused you or something.
          OK let me ask you a question....
          Are you doing anything to stop illegal immigration????? come on tell me moron...
          Of course not you are just a talker and whinner like a little girl.

          Comment


          • #6
            SonofMichael,

            The articles are about the upcoming documentary to be aired in September. Some people might be interested in watching it. Some might not.

            You might be responding to the wrong thread. There's no mention of McDonald's and Taco Bell. Actually your post demonstrates you missed the mark anyway.

            The universe doesn't revolve solely around you or your opinions. Your point of view can be dangerous if you're substituting it for insight and understanding.

            If you find the articles distateful, you have the perogative of scrolling on down the pages, clicking on left/right arrows, or logging out of the system.

            Comment


            • #7
              You are wrong; the Universe DOES in fact revolve around me and my opinions. I am a scientist and I know this to be fact.

              You are too ignorant to understand this

              Comment


              • #8
                <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SonofMichael:
                You are wrong; the Universe DOES in fact revolve around me and my opinions. I am a scientist and I know this to be fact.

                You are too ignorant to understand this </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
                I know this to be fact I am a scientist? You know that to be a fact? That was in the same sentence. I'm proud that you know what your are.
                I'm not too ignorant to understand that it makes me no difference what you are.

                Comment


                • #9
                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SonofMichael:
                  You are wrong; the Universe DOES in fact revolve around me and my opinions. I am a scientist and I know this to be fact.

                  You are too ignorant to understand this </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                  Really? I didn't know high school dropouts could become scientists????? Really scarey! You need to go someplace for a reality check - and soon!!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [QUOTE]Originally posted by explora:


                    Discrimination takes many forms. It's not just the denying of opportunity, it can also be the denying of history.

                    So White European people are heavily discriminated...

                    The Crimean Khanate, a Crimean Tatar state from 1441 to 1783, was undoubtedly one of the strongest powers in Eastern Europe until the 18th century. Crimean Tatars played an invaluable role in defending the borders of Islam. In a process called "harvesting of the steppe" they enslaved many Slavic peasants, and acquired booty. For a long time, until the early 18th century, the khanate maintained a massive slave trade with the Ottoman Empire and the Middle East. Kefe was one of the best known and significant trading ports and slave markets. Some researchers estimate that altogether more than 3 million people, predominantly Ukrainians but also Russians, Belarusians and Poles, were captured and enslaved during the time of the Crimean Khanate.

                    Between 1530 and 1830 there were almost certainly 1 million and quite possibly as many as 1.25 million white, European Christians enslaved by the Muslims of North Africa. Enslavement was a very real possibility for anyone who traveled in the Mediterranean, or who lived along the shores in places like Italy, France, Spain and Portugal, and even as far north as England and Iceland. Pirates (called corsairs) from cities along the Barbary Coast in north Africa – cities such as Tunis, Tripolis and Algiers – would raid ships in the Mediterranean and Atlantic, as well as seaside villages to capture men, women and children. The impact of these attacks were devastating – France, England, and Spain each lost thousands of ships, and long stretches of the Spanish and Italian coasts were almost completely abandoned by their inhabitants. Even Americans were not immune. For example, one American slave reported that 130 other American seamen had been enslaved by the Algerians in the Mediterranean and Atlantic just between 1785 and 1793. The great pirate city Algiers was not in fact thoroughly tamed till its conquest by France in 1830.

                    Mongol/Tatar nomads from Central Asia (Native Americans are also believed to have immigrated from central Asia), brought the plague from central Asia to the Europe in 14th century. When their ranks started falling to the disease during their siege of the Genoese trading colony of Kaffa, on the Black Sea, they started catapulting the dead bodies over the walls of the city. The fleeing Genoese unintentionally took the disease to Europe with them. That is the first documented instance of biological warfare in history. The Black Death is estimated to have killed between a third and two-thirds of Europe's population by the late 1340s. It was killing people well into the 1600s, in fact - thanks to the Mongols. By the end of 1350 the Black Death had subsided, but it never really died out in England for the next several hundred years. There were further outbreaks in 1361-62, 1369, 1379-83, 1389-93, and throughout the first half of the 15th century.

                    England lost as many as 70% of its population, which passed from 7 million to 2 million in 1400. Plague often killed 10% of a community in less than a year - in the worst epidemics, such as Norwich in 1579 and Newcastle in 1636, as many as 30 or 40%. The Great Plague of London (1665-1666), last massive outbreak of disease in England, killed at least 100,000 people, up to a fifth of London's population, though the figure may have been much higher. The city of Sevilla and its rural districts were thought to have lost 150,000 people "” a full quarter of its total population of 600,000, during massive outbreak of plague in Spain (1647-1652). Sevilla, and indeed the economy of Andalusia, would never recover from so complete a devastation. Altogether Spain was thought to have lost 500,000 people, or nearly 5% of its entire population. In 1720, 50,000 of Marseille's total population of 90,000 died. The plague then spread north, eventually reaching Aix- en-Provence, Arles, Apt and Toulon. Estimates indicate an overall death rate of between 25%-50% for the population in the larger area, with the city of Marseille at 40%, the area of Toulon at above 50%.

                    Anyone should ask themselves what might have happen if the balance of power between Europeans and Native Americans had been reversed. Since Native Americans are descended from Asiatic people, the brutal Mongol invasions of Europe might supply part of the answer. The first clash between Europeans and Native Americans occurred in Greenland rather than in North American or South America. Greenland was empty when Icelanders settled it around 984. The Scandinavians built settlements in deep fjords in the south and central part of the island, which is practically continental in size. About 200 years later, Inuits crossed from North America to Greenland, established settlements in the north and began attacking the Icelandic settlements. (The Scandinavians were unaware of the Inuits' presence until they found one of their villages destroyed and its inhabitants murdered.) After almost five hundred years, the Scandinavian settlements simply vanished. This could have been due to famine or the bubonic plague or the Inuit may have simply exterminated the Scandinavians as their population shrank. Many historians conclude it was a combination of these three factors.

                    Latinos take tremendous pride in their military service to the United States, which dates back at least to the Civil War.

                    However, the absolute majority of soldiers who fought and suffered - and died - in the deadliest wars waged by the USA (Civil war, WW1, WW2) were white men... At least 618,000 Americans died in the Civil War, and some experts say the toll reached 700,000. Estimated 4 million black slaves were freed in 1865. Based on 1860 census figures, 8 percent of all white males aged 13 to 43 died in the war, including 6 percent in the North and an extraordinary 18 percent in the South. There were the unprecedented, grisly logistics of clearing battlegrounds so filled with corpses that, as some horrified observers reported, one could have walked across the field atop them. This is modern warfare: it's not bravery, nor brilliance. It's just slaughter. There were 116,516 American casualties in World War I. During World War II in all 708 African Americans were killed in combat. Total American losses were 407,300 soldiers. There are no definitive numbers for what proportion of the 16 million Americans who served in World War II were Latinos. The D-Day World War II Museum in New Orleans has put the number at 250,000-500,000.

                    In 1900 the US population was 90% white, 10% black, and less than 1% Native American and Asian. Almost all of the residents of the ten largest American cities of 1900 were non-Hispanic whites. Less than 4 percent of these urban residents were black. The Asian, mostly Chinese and Japanese, city population was too small to register on the chart. The category of Hispanics had not yet been invented for statistical purposes, but their numbers were negligible outside of the Southwest and there were no large cities in that region.

                    In 1900, there were only slightly more than 500,000 Latinos, mainly descendants of Spanish and other hispanized European settlers (including Frenchmen like Juan Seguin, Italian like Jose Cassiano, or Corsican like Antonio Navarro) in New Mexico, California and Texas. For example, people who colonized Texas in the Spanish Colonial Period were and drew their identity from the Spaniards and the criollos, and had their history and identity in the history of Spain and of the United States. This difference caused the people of Texas, the colonial Tejanos or Tejano Texians, to identify more with the people of Louisiana, which was a Spanish colony, and of the U.S., rather than with the people of Mexico. For this reason as early as 1813 the colonial Tejanos established a government in Texas that looked forward to becoming part of the United States. As revealed by the writings of colonial Tejano Texians such as Antonio Menchaca, the Texas Revolution was first and foremost a colonial Tejano cause, the Anglo Americans simply joined the colonial Tejanos in that cause. By 1830, the 30,000 Anglo settlers in Texas outnumbered the Tejanos two to one. The Anglos and Tejanos alike rebelled against the centralized authority of Mexico City and the draconian measures implemented by the Santa Anna regime.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      ERASED FROM HISTORY - THE SUFFERING OF THE PEOPLE OF THE EASTERN EUROPE

                      Discrimination takes many forms. It's not just the denying of opportunity, it can also be the denying of history.

                      Sad to say, current quotas in the immigration laws of the Western countries strictly limit immigration of people of Eastern Europe into fellow Western nations. I´m Eastern European and I don´t understand it. For example, total 123,424 people immigrated to Australia in 2005. Of them, 17,736 were from Africa, 54,804 from Asia (4,239 from Philippines, 3,036 from Singapore, 2,936 from Malaysia etc.), but only 2,369 people were allowed to immigrate from Eastern Europe (including former Soviet Union, Poland, Balkans etc.). (SOURCE: Government of Australia, Department of Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs). In fact, the greatest human losses in fight against Nazism and Communism and for better future, freedom and prosperity of all Western nations were suffered by combatants and civilians of the Eastern Europe. Sadly, I don´t see any gratitude and solidarity with fellow Eastern Europeans (with common history, culture and origin as Western nations) by the Goverment of the Western Europe, USA, Canada, Australia. Maybe they forgot...

                      Research in Russia since the fall of communism has shed new light on Soviet World War II casualties. A Russian historian Vadim Erlikman has detailed Soviet losses totaling 26.5 million war related deaths. Military losses of 10.6 million include 7.6 million killed or missing in action and 2.6 million POW dead, plus 400,000 paramilitary and Soviet partisan losses. Civilian deaths totaled 15.9 million which included 1.5 million from military actions; 7.1 million victims of Nazi genocide and reprisals; 1.8 million deported to Germany for forced labor; and 5.5 million famine and disease deaths (including 3.0 million in the territory not under German occupation). Additional famine deaths which totaled 1 million during 1946-47 are not included here. These losses are for the entire territory of the USSR including territories annexed in 1939-40. Following bloody encirclement battles, all of the present-day Belarus territory was occupied by the Germans by the end of August 1941. The Nazis imposed a brutal regime, burning down some 9,000 Belarusian villages, deporting some 380,000 people for slave labour, and killing hundreds of thousands of civilians more. In total, Belarus lost a quarter of its pre-war population in the Second World War, including practically all its intellectual elite.

                      The official Polish government report of war losses prepared in 1947 reported 6,028,000 war victims out of a population of 27,007,000 ethnic Poles and Jews; this report excluded ethnic Ukrainian and Belarusian losses. The U.S. Bureau of the Census published a report in 1954, The Population of Yugoslavia, p.23, that concluded that war related deaths were 1,067,000. Military losses of 237,000 Yugoslav partisans and 209,000 Ustaše. Civilian dead of 581,000.

                      Though Stalin murdered more people than Hitler, to Roosevelt he remained ˜Uncle Joe.' At Yalta, Stalin even boasted to Churchill he had killed over 10 million peasants. Olga Shatunovskaya, a member of the Soviet Commission of Party Control, and head of a special commission during the 1960s appointed by Khrushchev, has concluded in her report that "from January 1, 1935 to June 22, 1941, 19,840,000 people (class enemies) were arrested. Of these, seven million were shot in prison, and a majority of the others died in camp." Disruption caused by collectivization was largely responsible for major famines. The 1932-1933 famine in Ukraine and the Kuban regions has been termed the Holodomor. Famine also affected various other parts of the USSR. The death toll from famine in the Soviet Union at this time is estimated at ten million people. (The worst crop failure of late tsarist Russia, in 1892, caused 375,000 to 400,000 deaths).

                      Yet today, on the 70th anniversary of the destruction of a quarter of Ukraine's population, this titanic crime has almost vanished into history's black hole. So has the extermination of the Don Cossacks by the Soviets in the 1920's, and Volga Germans, in 1941; and mass executions and deportations to concentration camps of Lithuanians, Latvians, Estonians, and Poles. At the end of World War II, Stalin's gulag held 5.5 million prisoners, 23% Ukrainians and 6% Baltic peoples. Almost unknown is the genocide of 2 million of the USSR's Muslim peoples: Chechen, Ingush, Crimean Tatars, Tajiks, Bashkir, Kazaks. The Chechen independence fighters today branded ˜terrorists' by the US and Russia are the grandchildren of survivors of Soviet concentration camps. Add to this list of forgotten atrocities the murder in Eastern Europe from 1945-47 of at least 2 million ethnic Germans, mostly women and children, and the violent expulsion of 15 million more Germans, during which 2 million German girls and women were raped.

                      Shortly before, during and immediately after World War II, Stalin conducted a series of deportations on a huge scale which profoundly affected the ethnic map of the Soviet Union. It is estimated that between 1941 and 1949 nearly 3.3 million were deported to Siberia and the Central Asian republics. Approximately 50% of the resettled population died of diseases and malnutrition. Estimates of the total number of deported Poles vary between 400,000 and 1.6 million people. The Red Army occupation lead to the deportation to Siberia of more than 200,000 ethnic Germans of Romania (around 75,000 Transylvanian Saxons), Hungary and Yugoslavia. Most of them died in prison camps. Forced labor of German civilians in the Soviet Union was considered by the Soviet Union to be part of German war reparations. The reported death rate was 39% among "arrested internees" from Upper Silesia and East Prussia. Rűdiger Overmans estimates 1,100,000 German civilian dead ( 690,000 from Germany and 410,000 ethnic Germans of eastern Europe) as the result of Red Army atrocities and the expulsion of Germans after World War II. Postwar deaths of about 500,000 due to famine and 270,000 deaths due to Forced labor of Germans in the Soviet Union are not included in these losses.

                      Among these monstrous crimes, Ukraine stands out as the worst in terms of numbers. Stalin declared war on his own people. In 1932 he sent Commissars V. Molotov and Lazar Kaganovitch, and NKVD secret police chief G. Yagoda to crush the resistance of Ukrainian farmers to forced collectivization. Ukraine was sealed off. All food supplies and livestock were confiscated. NKVD death squads executed ˜anti-party elements.' Furious that insufficient Ukrainians were being shot, Kaganovitch ' the Soviet Adolf Eichmann ' set a quota of 10,000 executions a week. Eighty percent of Ukrainian intellectuals were shot. During the bitter winter of 1932-33, 25,000 Ukrainians per day were being shot or dying of starvation and cold. Cannibalism became common. Ukraine, writes historian Robert Conquest, looked like a giant version of the future Bergan-Belsen death camp. The mass murder of 7 million Ukrainians, 3 million of them children, and deportation to the gulag of 2 million (where most died) was hidden by Soviet propaganda. Pro-communist westerners, like the ˜New York Times' Walter Duranty, Sidney and Beatrice Webb, and French Prime Minister Edouard Herriot, toured Ukraine, denied reports of genocide, and applauded what they called Soviet ˜agrarian reform.'

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by iperson:
                        You forgot about Katyn.

                        Katyn was just the tip of the iceberg.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As U.S. casualties in Iraq continue to mount, so does the worry in the country's Latino community that its children are dying in unusually high numbers and are being lured into dangerous service with targeted recruiting by the Armed Forces. Many in the community worry that Hispanic men and women are being disproportionately exposed to risk and sent to the front lines.

                          These worries have been exacerbated during the recent conflict in Iraq. As of Aug. 28, Department of Defense (DOD) statistics show a casualty rate of more than 13 percent for people of Hispanic background serving in Iraq. The casualty rate for Hispanics during the Iraqi engagement has been ''unfortunate and tragic'', says Teresa Gutierrez, of Act Now to Stop War and End Racism (ANSWER). ''The people who are fighting the war are youths who cannot find jobs or afford university fees because there is an economic draft in the army that is particularly relevant to Latinos,'' she told IPS.

                          Recent census numbers reveal why the U.S. government might be interested in specifically targeting Latinos. In 2000, one in seven 18-year-olds was of Hispanic origin, a number that is expected to climb to more than one in five during the next 15 years, found the census. Also, more than 50 percent of the Hispanic population (almost 18 million people) lived in Texas and California, states that are historically large recruitment centers for the Armed Forces. However, DOD officials denied knowledge of any program specifically targeted at Latinos.

                          ''What can we say of the young Latino men who sacrificed their lives in Iraq?" asked Jorge Mariscal, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, in the Apr. 18, 2003 issue of 'Counterpunch'. "That they fought without knowing their enemy, played their role as pawns in a geopolitical chess game devised by arrogant bureaucrats, and died simply trying to get an education; trying to have a fair shot at the American Dream that has eluded the vast majority of Latinos for over a century and a half.''

                          http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2003/ira...s/2007.05.html

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Who cares about Hispanics anyway?

                            Comment

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