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  • One of the Reason TSC in a big mess

    Courtesy of the Murthy's law firm:

    ================================================
    TSC Update : April 2004

    The backlog of cases at the Texas Service Center (TSC) is a significant problem,
    with processing times measured in years in many instances. This affects many
    readers of MurthyDotCom and the MURTHYBULLETIN. We, therefore, provide the
    following update on procedures and plans at the TSC, released in April 2004. The
    information was provided by Evelyn Upchurch, Director, TSC, and Ninfa Luna,
    Assistant Center Director for Documents, in response to questions from the State
    Bar of Texas.

    Staffing Levels

    The TSC presently is experiencing a personnel vacancy rate in excess of 25
    percent. It has significant problems in obtaining security checks for potential
    employees. These security checks take up to 200 days. Because, in many cases,
    people cannot wait that long to start a job, the prospective employees accept
    other offers of employment before the security checks are cleared and the job at
    the TSC can be finalized. The TSC also has high rates of attrition, due to
    positions that are for a set term rather than being permanent. Because people
    are seeking permanent positions, there is high rate of employee turnover. Of
    course, as with any business, having many vacant positions reduces productivity.

    Immediate Relatives and I-824

    The TSC has an enormous backlog in I-130 cases. Even immediate-relative cases
    are taking around two years, despite their having available visa numbers and
    having been given priority in processing. The TSC advised that there is a plan,
    both at the TSC and the Nebraska Service Center (NSC), to reduce the backlog in
    immediate relative I-130 cases. The plan sets a goal of bringing the processing
    times to within one year of receipt of the case.

    The TSC also plans to reduce the backlog in I-824 processing for Applications
    for Action on an Approved Petition. The I-824 is used to initiate
    following-to-join cases for relatives who are abroad. The delays in I-824
    processing often keep spouses and children in employment-based cases separated
    from their relatives in the United States. Faster processing of I-824s would be
    an enormous benefit in uniting families earlier, a goal of our immigration
    policies.

    Balancing Various Work Priorities

    The TSC confirmed that it sets priorities for work completion based first upon
    judicial mandates. Second priority cases are those that affect the local
    District USCIS offices, and third are all other cases that are selected as
    Service Center priorities for any reason. What this generally means is that
    improvement in one type of case, designated as a priority based on law or
    policy, results in a slow-down in the processing of a different, non-priority
    case.

    Portability Only after I-140 is Approved

    The TSC confirmed that they are following the August 2003 Memo regarding AC21
    portability. For a detailed analysis of this Memo, see our August 12, 2003
    article, "BCIS Memo on I-485 Portability after I-140 Revocation"
    <http://www.murthy.com/news/UDportme.html>, available on MurthyDotCom. The TSC
    verified its position that the beneficiary cannot use AC21 portability until the
    I-140 has been approved and the I-485 has been pending for 180 days. It also
    stated that the beneficiary must inform the service center of the change of job
    when s/he uses portability. We note that, while this is implied in various USCIS
    or Legacy INS Memos and is what we routinely recommend, this requirement is not
    specified in the AC21 law itself.

    ================================================

  • #2
    Courtesy of the Murthy's law firm:

    ================================================
    TSC Update : April 2004

    The backlog of cases at the Texas Service Center (TSC) is a significant problem,
    with processing times measured in years in many instances. This affects many
    readers of MurthyDotCom and the MURTHYBULLETIN. We, therefore, provide the
    following update on procedures and plans at the TSC, released in April 2004. The
    information was provided by Evelyn Upchurch, Director, TSC, and Ninfa Luna,
    Assistant Center Director for Documents, in response to questions from the State
    Bar of Texas.

    Staffing Levels

    The TSC presently is experiencing a personnel vacancy rate in excess of 25
    percent. It has significant problems in obtaining security checks for potential
    employees. These security checks take up to 200 days. Because, in many cases,
    people cannot wait that long to start a job, the prospective employees accept
    other offers of employment before the security checks are cleared and the job at
    the TSC can be finalized. The TSC also has high rates of attrition, due to
    positions that are for a set term rather than being permanent. Because people
    are seeking permanent positions, there is high rate of employee turnover. Of
    course, as with any business, having many vacant positions reduces productivity.

    Immediate Relatives and I-824

    The TSC has an enormous backlog in I-130 cases. Even immediate-relative cases
    are taking around two years, despite their having available visa numbers and
    having been given priority in processing. The TSC advised that there is a plan,
    both at the TSC and the Nebraska Service Center (NSC), to reduce the backlog in
    immediate relative I-130 cases. The plan sets a goal of bringing the processing
    times to within one year of receipt of the case.

    The TSC also plans to reduce the backlog in I-824 processing for Applications
    for Action on an Approved Petition. The I-824 is used to initiate
    following-to-join cases for relatives who are abroad. The delays in I-824
    processing often keep spouses and children in employment-based cases separated
    from their relatives in the United States. Faster processing of I-824s would be
    an enormous benefit in uniting families earlier, a goal of our immigration
    policies.

    Balancing Various Work Priorities

    The TSC confirmed that it sets priorities for work completion based first upon
    judicial mandates. Second priority cases are those that affect the local
    District USCIS offices, and third are all other cases that are selected as
    Service Center priorities for any reason. What this generally means is that
    improvement in one type of case, designated as a priority based on law or
    policy, results in a slow-down in the processing of a different, non-priority
    case.

    Portability Only after I-140 is Approved

    The TSC confirmed that they are following the August 2003 Memo regarding AC21
    portability. For a detailed analysis of this Memo, see our August 12, 2003
    article, "BCIS Memo on I-485 Portability after I-140 Revocation"
    &lt;http://www.murthy.com/news/UDportme.html&gt;, available on MurthyDotCom. The TSC
    verified its position that the beneficiary cannot use AC21 portability until the
    I-140 has been approved and the I-485 has been pending for 180 days. It also
    stated that the beneficiary must inform the service center of the change of job
    when s/he uses portability. We note that, while this is implied in various USCIS
    or Legacy INS Memos and is what we routinely recommend, this requirement is not
    specified in the AC21 law itself.

    ================================================

    Comment


    • #3
      I found this one is particularly disturbing:

      " What this generally means is that improvement in one type of case, designated as a priority based on law or policy, results in a slow-down in the processing of a different, non-priority
      case."

      So instead of fixing the underlying problem, they just shuffle the deck to whoever yell the loudest or whoever Washington tries to win their votes.....


      They should just centralize everything in 1 big pile, instead of having several different service center, with different processing dates and big lagger (Texas & California) included in them. At least there'll be uniformality across the board.

      Comment

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