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  • THE GREAT AMERICAN BOYCOTT..RALLIES

    WELCOME AMERICA, WE WILL TEACH YOU TO RESPECT IMMIGRANTS RIGHT..WE WILL BREAK THE BACK OF THE OPPOSITION THAT WANTS TO DEPORT US.
    ----------------------

    Schools chief opposed; divided Senate backs it

    By Jeff McDonald and Maureen Magee
    STAFF WRITERS

    April 28, 2006

    The question of reforming national immigration policy has long divided politicians of every stripe. Yesterday it drove a wedge between leaders in California government.

    While the state's highest education official was urging public school students to ignore a national immigration boycott scheduled for Monday, the state Senate passed a resolution supporting the planned walkout.


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    State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell told students in San Jose that political activism should not interfere with school.
    About the same time in Sacramento, the California Senate was debating a resolution embracing the boycott, which calls on students, workers and other activists to push for comprehensive immigration reform by staying home from school and work, and to showcase their economic clout by not spending money.

    The resolution passed on a largely partisan vote, 24-13, with Democrats in favor and Republicans opposed.

    Supporters equated the boycott with the great social movements in American history, saying it would spotlight the unseen influence of millions of people who contribute daily to the economy and society.

    "It's one day ... for immigrants to tell the country peacefully, 'We matter ... (we're) not invisible,' " said Senate Majority Leader Gloria Romero, D-Los Angeles, the resolution's chief author. She said immigrants make up a third of California's labor force and a quarter of its residents.

    O'Connell worried that another walkout like those that marked protests last month, which drew thousands of students from their classrooms, would disrupt instruction and cost local school districts badly needed revenue. The state calculates payments to schools based on the number of children attending class each day.

    "If students need to protest, they should feel free to do so after school," O'Connell told young people during an appearance at San Jose High Academy. "We want students to exercise free speech, but not at the expense of their education."

    The looming protest, dubbed "The Great American Boycott 2006" by the state Senate resolution, also has drawn concern from San Diego County leaders.

    At a press conference yesterday, Auxiliary Bishop Salvatore Cordileone of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego joined San Diego city schools Superintendent Carl Cohn in urging parents to make sure their children get to school.

    "We want to recognize the importance of what is taking place," Cohn said. But "we don't want students to miss out on any educational opportunities."

    Thousands of students skipped school – and some were arrested – during marches and demonstrations late last month to protest proposed changes to the nation's immigration laws. Several of the county's school districts canceled classes altogether.

    Cohn said educators are obligated to teach about the contributions immigrants have made to California and the United States, and he pledged that students will have a forum to discuss their concerns about proposed immigration laws next week.

    "We are trying not to overreact or under-react," Cohn said.

    While Cordileone called on students to go to school Monday, he was less adamant that undocumented workers show up at their jobs or spend money as usual. "I can understand it," he said of those parts of the protest.

    The planned boycott has met with mixed reaction from Latino business groups, which are torn between sustaining a stable business climate and advocating on behalf of their constituents.

    The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, for example, issued a statement urging workers who plan to stay home Monday to alert their employers ahead of time to minimize disruptions. But the group did say action is needed.

    "The time for politically-motivated rhetoric has ended; our nation deserves fair and equitable results," the statement read.

    The immigration debate has exploded nationally in recent weeks, fueled largely by a controversial bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives in December.

    Under federal law, it is a civil offense for undocumented immigrants to be in this country. But the House bill would make such a violation a felony punishable by imprisonment.

    It would also become a crime to provide social services or other aid to the estimated 12 million illegal immigrants in the United States – a prospect that has spurred opposition from church officials across the country.

    The latest round in the immigration debate has mobilized a new generation of activists, many of whom are children of illegal immigrants. Using the Internet, text-messaging and other technology, young people have organized massive rallies across the country.

    The California senators who supported yesterday's resolution said that the United States has a long tradition of effecting change through protest and civil disobedience. The resolution itself says immigrants pay $4.5 billion in state taxes and an additional $30 billion in federal taxes every year.

    But the tax argument did little to sway Sen. Bill Morrow, the Oceanside Republican who took to the Senate floor to speak out against the resolution.

    "It is a disingenuous effort to put the government of California on record supporting open borders," he said.

    The extent of the walkout will not be known until Monday, and its impact may not become known until much later.

    But widespread protests in dozens of American cities last month helped prevent the U.S. Senate from passing its own immigration-reform bill earlier this month.

    Three weeks ago, at least 50,000 immigration-rights supporters crowded downtown San Diego. It was one of the biggest crowds ever to congregate in the central city.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.

  • #2
    WELCOME AMERICA, WE WILL TEACH YOU TO RESPECT IMMIGRANTS RIGHT..WE WILL BREAK THE BACK OF THE OPPOSITION THAT WANTS TO DEPORT US.
    ----------------------

    Schools chief opposed; divided Senate backs it

    By Jeff McDonald and Maureen Magee
    STAFF WRITERS

    April 28, 2006

    The question of reforming national immigration policy has long divided politicians of every stripe. Yesterday it drove a wedge between leaders in California government.

    While the state's highest education official was urging public school students to ignore a national immigration boycott scheduled for Monday, the state Senate passed a resolution supporting the planned walkout.


    Advertisement



    State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell told students in San Jose that political activism should not interfere with school.
    About the same time in Sacramento, the California Senate was debating a resolution embracing the boycott, which calls on students, workers and other activists to push for comprehensive immigration reform by staying home from school and work, and to showcase their economic clout by not spending money.

    The resolution passed on a largely partisan vote, 24-13, with Democrats in favor and Republicans opposed.

    Supporters equated the boycott with the great social movements in American history, saying it would spotlight the unseen influence of millions of people who contribute daily to the economy and society.

    "It's one day ... for immigrants to tell the country peacefully, 'We matter ... (we're) not invisible,' " said Senate Majority Leader Gloria Romero, D-Los Angeles, the resolution's chief author. She said immigrants make up a third of California's labor force and a quarter of its residents.

    O'Connell worried that another walkout like those that marked protests last month, which drew thousands of students from their classrooms, would disrupt instruction and cost local school districts badly needed revenue. The state calculates payments to schools based on the number of children attending class each day.

    "If students need to protest, they should feel free to do so after school," O'Connell told young people during an appearance at San Jose High Academy. "We want students to exercise free speech, but not at the expense of their education."

    The looming protest, dubbed "The Great American Boycott 2006" by the state Senate resolution, also has drawn concern from San Diego County leaders.

    At a press conference yesterday, Auxiliary Bishop Salvatore Cordileone of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego joined San Diego city schools Superintendent Carl Cohn in urging parents to make sure their children get to school.

    "We want to recognize the importance of what is taking place," Cohn said. But "we don't want students to miss out on any educational opportunities."

    Thousands of students skipped school – and some were arrested – during marches and demonstrations late last month to protest proposed changes to the nation's immigration laws. Several of the county's school districts canceled classes altogether.

    Cohn said educators are obligated to teach about the contributions immigrants have made to California and the United States, and he pledged that students will have a forum to discuss their concerns about proposed immigration laws next week.

    "We are trying not to overreact or under-react," Cohn said.

    While Cordileone called on students to go to school Monday, he was less adamant that undocumented workers show up at their jobs or spend money as usual. "I can understand it," he said of those parts of the protest.

    The planned boycott has met with mixed reaction from Latino business groups, which are torn between sustaining a stable business climate and advocating on behalf of their constituents.

    The U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, for example, issued a statement urging workers who plan to stay home Monday to alert their employers ahead of time to minimize disruptions. But the group did say action is needed.

    "The time for politically-motivated rhetoric has ended; our nation deserves fair and equitable results," the statement read.

    The immigration debate has exploded nationally in recent weeks, fueled largely by a controversial bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives in December.

    Under federal law, it is a civil offense for undocumented immigrants to be in this country. But the House bill would make such a violation a felony punishable by imprisonment.

    It would also become a crime to provide social services or other aid to the estimated 12 million illegal immigrants in the United States – a prospect that has spurred opposition from church officials across the country.

    The latest round in the immigration debate has mobilized a new generation of activists, many of whom are children of illegal immigrants. Using the Internet, text-messaging and other technology, young people have organized massive rallies across the country.

    The California senators who supported yesterday's resolution said that the United States has a long tradition of effecting change through protest and civil disobedience. The resolution itself says immigrants pay $4.5 billion in state taxes and an additional $30 billion in federal taxes every year.

    But the tax argument did little to sway Sen. Bill Morrow, the Oceanside Republican who took to the Senate floor to speak out against the resolution.

    "It is a disingenuous effort to put the government of California on record supporting open borders," he said.

    The extent of the walkout will not be known until Monday, and its impact may not become known until much later.

    But widespread protests in dozens of American cities last month helped prevent the U.S. Senate from passing its own immigration-reform bill earlier this month.

    Three weeks ago, at least 50,000 immigration-rights supporters crowded downtown San Diego. It was one of the biggest crowds ever to congregate in the central city.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.

    Comment


    • #3
      WOW, CAN YOU BELIEVE THAT, THE CALIFORNIA SENATE APPROAVED THE GREAT BOYCOTT ON MAY 1ST..WE WILL GET THE AMNESTY BY JUNE..JUNE 15TH!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Hopefully we can use this boycott against dirtbags - to radically turn public opinion against them - and have their dirtbag behinds deported once and for all back to whatever dirtland they came from !!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Im keeping my fingers crossed. I believe Amnesty is going to happen and it will be a slap in the face to many in this forum

          Comment


          • #6
            No Amnesty baby...maybe a temporary visa to use your a.sses to develop the country and after that....Asta La Vista.

            Comment

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