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ANOTHER NEW BOMBSHELL POLL SHOWING IMMIGRATION DEBATE IS SHIFTING TOWARD PRO-AMNESTY

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  • ANOTHER NEW BOMBSHELL POLL SHOWING IMMIGRATION DEBATE IS SHIFTING TOWARD PRO-AMNESTY

    GUYS, I WOULD LIKE YOU TO PLEASE! PLEASE READ THIS ARTICLE..THIS ARTICLE+POLL IS ONE OF MANY NEW POLLS THAT ARE SUGGESTING THAT THE AMERICAN PUBLICS WANTS THE UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS THAT ARE ALREADY INSIDE, TO BE HANDLED IN A COMPASSIONATE WAY WHYLE AT THE SAME TIME, SHUTTING DOWN OUR BORDER.

    WE CAN DO BOTH, AND ONLY ALIBA AND TANCREDO WHO BELIEVE WE CAN ONLY DO ENFORCEMENT AND IGNORE 11 MILLION PEOPLE.
    -------------

    Americans Favor Helping Immigrants, Shoring Up Borders
    By Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
    6:00 PM PDT, April 12, 2006


    WASHINGTON -- Most Americans say the United States should confront the challenge of illegal immigration by both toughening border enforcement and creating a new guest worker program, instead of by cracking down on enforcement alone, a Times/Bloomberg poll has found.

    By a solid 2 to 1 margin, those surveyed said they would prefer such a comprehensive approach, which a bipartisan group of senators has proposed, to an enforcement-only strategy, which the House of Representatives approved in December. Support for a comprehensive approach was about the same among Democrats, independents and Republicans, the poll found.

    "Do you remember 100 years ago when we were saying, 'Give us your tired, give us your poor?'" asked David Wells, a Republican who works as a golf course groundskeeper in Plant City, Fla. "How come that doesn't still stand? I don't think it is right to send all the people back who have been here 15 or 20 years, who have families here, who have been good, who haven't been in jail and have been productive."

    Still, Americans showed markedly less enthusiasm for allowing guest workers to continue to flow into the United States in the future than they did for proposals to permit the estimated 11 million to 12 million illegal immigrants already in the U.S. to remain legally.

    And even some of those who rejected efforts to remove the illegal immigrants already here made clear in interviews that their opposition was based more on practical than philosophical objections.

    "I don't think you should be in the country illegally, and I think the people who are here are taking away opportunities from Americans," said Bill Erner, a Democratic factory worker from Dubuque, Iowa. "But the ones that are already here, it would be almost impossible to find them all and send them back to Mexico or wherever they came from."

    These findings came in a poll filled with ominous findings for the Republican House and Senate majority as the 2006 midterm elections approach.

    Although President Bush's job approval rating rebounded slightly from his 38% showing last month "” his lowest rating ever in a Times survey "” the new poll found Democrats opening double-digit leads on the key measures of voters' early preferences for the November balloting.

    Democrats now lead Republicans by 50% to 35% among registered voters who were asked which party they intend to support in their congressional districts this fall. When registered voters were asked which party they hope will control the House and Senate after the midterm election, 51% picked the Democrats and just 38% the GOP.

    On both questions, independent voters prefer Democrats by ratios of about 3 to 1 or more.

    The Republicans "don't have it anymore," said Alfred Smith, an independent in Bucks County, Pa., who runs a printing company. "They don't trust each other. They don't look like they are all together anymore."

    Forecasting the impact of these broad national attitudes on individual congressional contests is an imperfect science. Republicans could be helped this fall because relatively few House districts are closely balanced between the parties, and many of the key Senate races are occurring in states that lean toward the GOP.

    But the 14-percentage point lead for Democrats in the "generic" ballot test could represent an unusually formidable threat to those defenses: For example, the GOP advantage was only about one-third as large in the last Times poll before the GOP's landslide gains in the 1994 congressional elections.

    In these early soundings for 2006, Republicans face the potential reemergence of a gender gap that Bush narrowed in his 2004 reelection. While men split evenly when asked which party they intend to support in November, women prefer Democrats by 57% to 31%, the survey found. Democrats hold a commanding advantage not only among single women, a traditional Democratic constituency, but married women, a swing group that broke toward Bush and the GOP in 2004.

    The impasse in Washington over restructuring immigration laws has led many to predict that the issue could become a flashpoint in this year's election. But the public does not yet seem impassioned about the controversy: While 84% of poll respondents agreed that illegal immigration was a problem, only 31% identified it as one of the country's major problems.

    The idea that drew the most support in the survey was allowing "undocumented immigrants who have been living and working in the United States" to obtain visas to work here legally, and to move toward citizenship if they meet a list of requirements.

    Two-thirds of those polled said they supported such a proposal, with support notably higher among independents (71%) and Republicans (67%) than Democrats (59%).

    Still, about one-fifth of those responding agreed with Katherine Asaif, a Colorado Springs schoolteacher, who rejected such ideas. "I understand why people want to come to the United States," she said. "But it does seem to be rewarding the law-breaking."

    Establishing a program to import future guest workers drew more modest support, with 54% of those polled supporting and 21% opposing. Vivian Richardson, a nurse's assistant who lives outside Raleigh, N.C., believes guest workers are necessary because they perform jobs "Americans don't want to do anymore," such as working in fields or poultry plants.

    The guest worker idea also drew more support among independents (60%) and Republicans (56%) than Democrats (48%).

    After hearing all the alternatives, 63% said Congress should blend enforcement with a guest-worker program, as Bush and many senators in both parties want, whereas 30% said Congress should focus on enforcement only, as many House Republican leaders prefer.

    -------------

    POLLS AFTER POLLS CLEARLY SHOWS WHAT IVE SAID FROM DAY ONE..THE AMERICAN PUBLIC ARENT KKK RACIST BIGOTS LIKE ALIBA PADDY AND OTHER DIRTY RACIST SKINHEADS.

  • #2
    GUYS, I WOULD LIKE YOU TO PLEASE! PLEASE READ THIS ARTICLE..THIS ARTICLE+POLL IS ONE OF MANY NEW POLLS THAT ARE SUGGESTING THAT THE AMERICAN PUBLICS WANTS THE UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS THAT ARE ALREADY INSIDE, TO BE HANDLED IN A COMPASSIONATE WAY WHYLE AT THE SAME TIME, SHUTTING DOWN OUR BORDER.

    WE CAN DO BOTH, AND ONLY ALIBA AND TANCREDO WHO BELIEVE WE CAN ONLY DO ENFORCEMENT AND IGNORE 11 MILLION PEOPLE.
    -------------

    Americans Favor Helping Immigrants, Shoring Up Borders
    By Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
    6:00 PM PDT, April 12, 2006


    WASHINGTON -- Most Americans say the United States should confront the challenge of illegal immigration by both toughening border enforcement and creating a new guest worker program, instead of by cracking down on enforcement alone, a Times/Bloomberg poll has found.

    By a solid 2 to 1 margin, those surveyed said they would prefer such a comprehensive approach, which a bipartisan group of senators has proposed, to an enforcement-only strategy, which the House of Representatives approved in December. Support for a comprehensive approach was about the same among Democrats, independents and Republicans, the poll found.

    "Do you remember 100 years ago when we were saying, 'Give us your tired, give us your poor?'" asked David Wells, a Republican who works as a golf course groundskeeper in Plant City, Fla. "How come that doesn't still stand? I don't think it is right to send all the people back who have been here 15 or 20 years, who have families here, who have been good, who haven't been in jail and have been productive."

    Still, Americans showed markedly less enthusiasm for allowing guest workers to continue to flow into the United States in the future than they did for proposals to permit the estimated 11 million to 12 million illegal immigrants already in the U.S. to remain legally.

    And even some of those who rejected efforts to remove the illegal immigrants already here made clear in interviews that their opposition was based more on practical than philosophical objections.

    "I don't think you should be in the country illegally, and I think the people who are here are taking away opportunities from Americans," said Bill Erner, a Democratic factory worker from Dubuque, Iowa. "But the ones that are already here, it would be almost impossible to find them all and send them back to Mexico or wherever they came from."

    These findings came in a poll filled with ominous findings for the Republican House and Senate majority as the 2006 midterm elections approach.

    Although President Bush's job approval rating rebounded slightly from his 38% showing last month "” his lowest rating ever in a Times survey "” the new poll found Democrats opening double-digit leads on the key measures of voters' early preferences for the November balloting.

    Democrats now lead Republicans by 50% to 35% among registered voters who were asked which party they intend to support in their congressional districts this fall. When registered voters were asked which party they hope will control the House and Senate after the midterm election, 51% picked the Democrats and just 38% the GOP.

    On both questions, independent voters prefer Democrats by ratios of about 3 to 1 or more.

    The Republicans "don't have it anymore," said Alfred Smith, an independent in Bucks County, Pa., who runs a printing company. "They don't trust each other. They don't look like they are all together anymore."

    Forecasting the impact of these broad national attitudes on individual congressional contests is an imperfect science. Republicans could be helped this fall because relatively few House districts are closely balanced between the parties, and many of the key Senate races are occurring in states that lean toward the GOP.

    But the 14-percentage point lead for Democrats in the "generic" ballot test could represent an unusually formidable threat to those defenses: For example, the GOP advantage was only about one-third as large in the last Times poll before the GOP's landslide gains in the 1994 congressional elections.

    In these early soundings for 2006, Republicans face the potential reemergence of a gender gap that Bush narrowed in his 2004 reelection. While men split evenly when asked which party they intend to support in November, women prefer Democrats by 57% to 31%, the survey found. Democrats hold a commanding advantage not only among single women, a traditional Democratic constituency, but married women, a swing group that broke toward Bush and the GOP in 2004.

    The impasse in Washington over restructuring immigration laws has led many to predict that the issue could become a flashpoint in this year's election. But the public does not yet seem impassioned about the controversy: While 84% of poll respondents agreed that illegal immigration was a problem, only 31% identified it as one of the country's major problems.

    The idea that drew the most support in the survey was allowing "undocumented immigrants who have been living and working in the United States" to obtain visas to work here legally, and to move toward citizenship if they meet a list of requirements.

    Two-thirds of those polled said they supported such a proposal, with support notably higher among independents (71%) and Republicans (67%) than Democrats (59%).

    Still, about one-fifth of those responding agreed with Katherine Asaif, a Colorado Springs schoolteacher, who rejected such ideas. "I understand why people want to come to the United States," she said. "But it does seem to be rewarding the law-breaking."

    Establishing a program to import future guest workers drew more modest support, with 54% of those polled supporting and 21% opposing. Vivian Richardson, a nurse's assistant who lives outside Raleigh, N.C., believes guest workers are necessary because they perform jobs "Americans don't want to do anymore," such as working in fields or poultry plants.

    The guest worker idea also drew more support among independents (60%) and Republicans (56%) than Democrats (48%).

    After hearing all the alternatives, 63% said Congress should blend enforcement with a guest-worker program, as Bush and many senators in both parties want, whereas 30% said Congress should focus on enforcement only, as many House Republican leaders prefer.

    -------------

    POLLS AFTER POLLS CLEARLY SHOWS WHAT IVE SAID FROM DAY ONE..THE AMERICAN PUBLIC ARENT KKK RACIST BIGOTS LIKE ALIBA PADDY AND OTHER DIRTY RACIST SKINHEADS.

    Comment


    • #3
      Among all adults

      Do you support or oppose the following immigration proposals:

      Create a guest-worker program that would give a temporary visa to noncitizens who want to legally work in the U.S.

      Support: 54%

      Oppose: 21%

      Don't know: 25%

      *

      Allow undocumented immigrants who have been living and working in the U.S. for a number of years, with no criminal record, to start a path to citizenship.

      Support: 66%

      Oppose: 18%

      Don't know: 16%

      *

      Fence off hundreds of miles of the border between the U.S. and Mexico and make it a felony to enter illegally.

      Support: 42%

      Oppose: 35%

      Don't know: 23%



      Q: When it comes to immigration laws, do you prefer an approach that solely focuses on tougher enforcement or one that includes both tougher enforcement and a guest-worker program?

      Tougher enforcement and a guest-worker program: 63%

      Only tougher enforcement: 30%

      Don't know: 7%



      --


      -----------------------------

      LOOK AT THE NUMBERS BABY!! CAN YOU DIGG IT?!! I SAY, CAN YOU DIGG IT!? HAHAHAH POLL AFTER POLLS ****ERS AND THE SAME STORY POPS UP, THE AMERICAN PEOPLE STRONGLY SUPPORT THE BI PARTISAN APPROACH SO ITS TIME TO PASS THIS BILL.

      JUNE 15TH 2006 WILL BE FOREVER KNOWN AS THE YEAR WHEN 11 MILLION GOT ON A PATH TO LEGALIZATION.

      Comment


      • #4
        ALIBA??!! YOU DIRTY LITLE RACIST BIGOT, WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THIS NEW POLL???..AND PLEASE, KEEP IN MIND THAT THERE ARE 2 OTHER NEW POLLS THAT BASICLY SHOWS THE SAME NUMBER.

        LIKE IVE ALWAYS TOLD YOU GUYS, THE EXTREMIST ARE IN THE MINORITY...NO AMERICANS WANTS EVERYONE THAT IS NOT HERE LEGALLY TO JUST EXIT..PUNISHMENT IS WAY TOO HARSH FOR A MAN THAT HAVE BEEN LIVING HERE FOR YEARS!!

        Comment


        • #5
          And even some of those who rejected efforts to remove the illegal immigrants already here made clear in interviews that their opposition was based more on practical than philosophical objections.
          This is a sad statement. It implies (if it is at all representative of the American peoples' feelings) that our country has allowed itself to be so compromised that decisions cannot be made based upon beliefs but on being pushed into a corner.

          Jean, you are being so obnoxious, do you think you further your cause by name calling?

          Polls could be a great way for getting IDEAS of public opinion but who knows if they are really creditable. I always wonder who is being asked their opinion... in talking with friends,relatives, people that I work with and network with, we have realized that NONE of us have ever been asked our opinion in a poll. WHO is being polled? I really hate the ones that don't list how the poll was conducted or how many were in the sample. The other poll you listed consisted of talking to 900 people. 900 people where? All in one community? State? City? University? Alzheimers' unit? You can pick and choose poll results to support almost any cause.

          Comment


          • #6
            SORRY MY FRIENDS,BUT THIS POLLS IS ONE OF 3 NEW POLLS BY DIFFERENT COMPANIES AND THEY ALL SUGGEST THAT AMERICAN ARE READY TO OPEN THEIR ARM TO THE 12 MILLION MEXICAN!!.

            Comment


            • #7
              "Do you remember 100 years ago when we were saying, 'Give us your tired, give us your poor?'" asked David Wells, a Republican who works as a golf course groundskeeper in Plant City, Fla. "How come that doesn't still stand? I don't think it is right to send all the people back who have been here 15 or 20 years, who have families here, who have been good, who haven't been in jail and have been productive."
              ---------

              WOW!! THAT'S SUCH A GREAT POINT!!! THIS IS WHY AMERICANS ARE SO MORALY SUPERIOR TO OTHER NATIONALS IN THE WORLD..THIS EXCLUDE SPRING, PADDY AND ALIBA..THERE ARE GREAT AMERICAN WITH REAT HEART AND THEY WOULD NEVER FORGET ABOUT HOW THIS COUNTRY CAMED ABOUT.

              Comment


              • #8
                Jean, you don't know what I think, but you sure do leap to accusations. Your statements hurt me(NOT). I just don't happen to agree with any of the propositions that I have seen so far. Maybe a better proposition will come about in the future.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The only proposition you and the rest of your bigots family members would support is the deportation of 11 millions people..you are a white devil nativism...you are a racit bigots..your grand parents killed murdered black men and raped their women, now you want to kill mexican and raped their women..you are an idiot....i hope god deal with you when you're gone.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The only proposition you and the rest of your bigots family members would support is the deportation of 11 millions people..you are a white devil nativism...you are a racit bigots..your grand parents killed murdered black men and raped their women, now you want to kill mexican and raped their women..you are an idiot....i hope god deal with you when you're gone.
                    Jean, you don't know my family or anything about me and you make such statements? My grandparents, great grandparents, etc. were tenant farmers. Actually, my grandparents were tenant farmers/factory workers. They didn't rape or kill anyone, they worked hard in order to support their families. I was married to a Jewish man and some of my best friends are African American and Asian and I am racist? That is a joke. Do you think that making blanket accusations furthers your cause?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Jean are you having your monthly cycle or what?

                      Stop this obsession with amnesty. Go back to Mexico!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        marmamus- im african american, you idiot, but knowing how extreme people like you and spring are, you guys might suggest that every african americans should also be deported to africa.

                        you guys are white devil...we must rise up and fight against the white devils in this country who wants to oppress us...latino and blacks should fight side by side and fight off the white devil.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          which country in Africa are you from? Liberia?

                          Some Africans can stay and help us chase out these Mexican hoodlums!

                          I did not see any African during recent demonstrations which means they can stay.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            im not from liberia, you brainless white trash ,trailer park *****.

                            my grand grand parents migrated to the U.S from senegal.i was born here..what part of his cant you understand, you bigot??!!

                            African American leaders spoke at the rally in washington, on monday, and they all compared the immigration movement to the civil rights movement of the 1960's..huge movement that changed america..they all say this movement will also change america and will force lawmaker into graning the upcoming amnesty for my mexican brothers and sisters.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Geez then why are you so excited about an amnesty you African?

                              Go back to Senegal!!! We need to deport all people from Africa whether legal or illegal as we deport Mexicans!!

                              I want us to change the policy on deportation legal and illegals to include black people.

                              Comment

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