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What is Critical Analysis? (in detail)

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  • Antifascist1
    replied
    Visit the thread again !

    Leave a comment:


  • Hudson
    replied
    Congradulations foe playing the game, you have just proven my point.

    Leave a comment:


  • Antifascist1
    replied
    None of your posts offer anything but brosd, speculative, and lossely organized opiniond, not critical analysis.
    Says WHO?

    Hehehe ! One must read this !

    http://discuss.ilw.com/eve/forums/a/...31#59810069431

    Leave a comment:


  • Hudson
    replied
    Critical analysis: Careful, exact evaluation and judgment.

    http://www.apsu.edu/wet/whatis.html

    None of your posts offer anything but brosd, speculative, and lossely organized opiniond, not critical analysis.

    Leave a comment:


  • Antifascist1
    replied
    Good morning , ****sterhead !

    Still want to lecture me on definition of 'Critical Analysis', or argue against your own shadow on the subject of Chinese population control?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hudson
    replied
    If I ever 'attack' - then it's only lies ,that are veiled as member posts/questions, or outright stupid claims/questions posted - and those are an attack and insult on intelligence of the readers in the first place
    There is no such thing as a stupid question, just a stupid answer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Antifascist1
    replied
    If I ever 'attack' - then it's only lies ,that are veiled as member posts/questions, or outright stupid claims/questions posted - and those are an attack and insult on intelligence of the readers in the first place.

    Leave a comment:


  • macyuhoo
    replied
    Critical analysis is if you criticize members and attack them personally instead of attending to their immigration queries.
    That's you, antipeace!

    Leave a comment:


  • Antifascist1
    replied
    http://www.sussex.ac.uk/languages/1-6-8-2-3.html

    Sussex Language Institute


    What is Critical Analysis? (in detail)

    In academic terms, critical analysis means considering the claims of theorists, governments, authorities and so on, what they are based on, and how far they seem to apply or be relevant to a given situation. This involves splitting them up into their component parts.

    The base or premise of the claim.
    For example, does it claim to apply in all situations? If you can show that a general claim in a premise is false (e.g. all swans are white is not true, there are also black swans) then you will have critically analysed the premise and shown its fault. If the premise is faulty, the whole argument is faulty. You will need to provide examples of exceptions to the general rule that the premise claims to be true to demonstrate critical analysis. Sometimes you can show that the claim should be weaker - it is only sometimes, not always true.
    (See example)

    The relationship between the premise and the next step(s) and the conclusion.
    For example, Theory X worked in situation A and must therefore work in situation B.
    Here the premise may be true - theory X did work in situation A - but that is insufficient evidence to conclude that it will work in another situation. This is because a particular instance is being used to make a general claim. (Appropriate logic goes from the general to the particular, not the particular to the general.)

    To further analyse the claim (to suggest in more detail why it may or may not in practice work in situation B) involves considering the similarities and differences between situations A and B and whether there are the necessary and sufficient conditions in B to produce the same result as in A.

    Conditions can include such aspects as time, place (geographical location), social, cultural and economic conditions, education, foreign policy and trading treaties and so on. A necessary condition is an essential component but it may not be sufficient. Usually, to meet sufficient conditions requires a number of necessary conditions being present.
    For example, for a car to be driven, it needs parts - wheels, an engine etc. These are necessary but not sufficient conditions. When the car has all its mechanical and other parts in working order and fuel and a qualified driver, then all together, these would meet both the necessary and sufficient conditions for it to be driven.

    In general terms, because something works in one situation is no guarantee that it will work in another. It is necessary to find out why, under what conditions it works in one situation and to see if the same conditions hold in the second situation. To critically analyse and reject a claim, it may be enough to show that there are enough differences to make the outcome uncertain in situation B

    Similarly, sometimes two claims are acceptable, but the conclusion drawn from them is not.
    For example, water is necessary for survival; food is necessary for survival; therefore, to survive, we need only water and food. Here again, there is the problem of necessary conditions (water and food) which are not sufficient for survival. Heat, shelter and other things are considered as also necessary (see World Health Organisation charter for basic minimum conditions). Critical analysis for academic purposes often involves considering necessary and sufficient conditions (are there enough necessary conditions to make them sufficient, has anything been left out?).

    Leave a comment:


  • Antifascist1
    started a topic What is Critical Analysis? (in detail)

    What is Critical Analysis? (in detail)

    http://www.sussex.ac.uk/languages/1-6-8-2-3.html

    Sussex Language Institute


    What is Critical Analysis? (in detail)

    In academic terms, critical analysis means considering the claims of theorists, governments, authorities and so on, what they are based on, and how far they seem to apply or be relevant to a given situation. This involves splitting them up into their component parts.

    The base or premise of the claim.
    For example, does it claim to apply in all situations? If you can show that a general claim in a premise is false (e.g. all swans are white is not true, there are also black swans) then you will have critically analysed the premise and shown its fault. If the premise is faulty, the whole argument is faulty. You will need to provide examples of exceptions to the general rule that the premise claims to be true to demonstrate critical analysis. Sometimes you can show that the claim should be weaker - it is only sometimes, not always true.
    (See example)

    The relationship between the premise and the next step(s) and the conclusion.
    For example, Theory X worked in situation A and must therefore work in situation B.
    Here the premise may be true - theory X did work in situation A - but that is insufficient evidence to conclude that it will work in another situation. This is because a particular instance is being used to make a general claim. (Appropriate logic goes from the general to the particular, not the particular to the general.)

    To further analyse the claim (to suggest in more detail why it may or may not in practice work in situation B) involves considering the similarities and differences between situations A and B and whether there are the necessary and sufficient conditions in B to produce the same result as in A.

    Conditions can include such aspects as time, place (geographical location), social, cultural and economic conditions, education, foreign policy and trading treaties and so on. A necessary condition is an essential component but it may not be sufficient. Usually, to meet sufficient conditions requires a number of necessary conditions being present.
    For example, for a car to be driven, it needs parts - wheels, an engine etc. These are necessary but not sufficient conditions. When the car has all its mechanical and other parts in working order and fuel and a qualified driver, then all together, these would meet both the necessary and sufficient conditions for it to be driven.

    In general terms, because something works in one situation is no guarantee that it will work in another. It is necessary to find out why, under what conditions it works in one situation and to see if the same conditions hold in the second situation. To critically analyse and reject a claim, it may be enough to show that there are enough differences to make the outcome uncertain in situation B

    Similarly, sometimes two claims are acceptable, but the conclusion drawn from them is not.
    For example, water is necessary for survival; food is necessary for survival; therefore, to survive, we need only water and food. Here again, there is the problem of necessary conditions (water and food) which are not sufficient for survival. Heat, shelter and other things are considered as also necessary (see World Health Organisation charter for basic minimum conditions). Critical analysis for academic purposes often involves considering necessary and sufficient conditions (are there enough necessary conditions to make them sufficient, has anything been left out?).
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