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  • We've got to respect people who are in our country

    I think something that will benefit our economy and help the small business sector is to reform our immigration laws to help -- (applause.) I proposed a worker program here that says we can match a willing foreign worker with an employer in America so long as an American is not willing to do the job. Look, I know a lot of you are wondering whether or not you're hiring somebody who you should be hiring. And that's because the system is broken down. That's why you wonder that. My attitude is, rather than have people live in the shadows of our society, let's have an honest system. Let's say that if you're -- if you need a worker, there's a way to help expedite your search for somebody in our country. But if you can't find anybody, you ought to be able to hire anybody you want. And therefore, we ought to have a temporary worker card for people.

    And it will help rout out the corruption and the fraud. You know what I'm talking about. The paperwork, you don't know where it comes from if you're hiring in the construction world. It doesn't make sense to have a system where Border Patrol is kind of searching for workers simply coming to our -- people coming to our country to make a living for their families. They ought to be looking for terrorists and narco traffickers, smugglers -- (applause.) And so a worker system would take the burden off of many at our borders.

    People often ask me, do you support amnesty? I don't. You see, and the reason I don't is because I'm afraid it would further illegal immigration, as well as rewards those who haven't lived to the law. We've got a lot of honest people who are trying to become citizens of the United States of America, who have stood in line for a long period of time, and it doesn't seem that we ought to have a worker system that allows somebody to cut in line. That's not fair. One of the things we are in America is we're fair. And people should -- people who have been in line shouldn't be penalized for having taken the legal route up to now.

    But one thing is for certain: We've got to respect people who are in our country. We've got to treat them with decency. And when the system is broke, we need to reform it. (Applause.)

    [ End ]


    White House

    President George W Bush

    Opening New Markets for America's Small Businesses
    Remarks by the President to the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
    Renaissance Hotel
    Washington, D.C.



    2:45 P.M. EST

  • #2
    I think something that will benefit our economy and help the small business sector is to reform our immigration laws to help -- (applause.) I proposed a worker program here that says we can match a willing foreign worker with an employer in America so long as an American is not willing to do the job. Look, I know a lot of you are wondering whether or not you're hiring somebody who you should be hiring. And that's because the system is broken down. That's why you wonder that. My attitude is, rather than have people live in the shadows of our society, let's have an honest system. Let's say that if you're -- if you need a worker, there's a way to help expedite your search for somebody in our country. But if you can't find anybody, you ought to be able to hire anybody you want. And therefore, we ought to have a temporary worker card for people.

    And it will help rout out the corruption and the fraud. You know what I'm talking about. The paperwork, you don't know where it comes from if you're hiring in the construction world. It doesn't make sense to have a system where Border Patrol is kind of searching for workers simply coming to our -- people coming to our country to make a living for their families. They ought to be looking for terrorists and narco traffickers, smugglers -- (applause.) And so a worker system would take the burden off of many at our borders.

    People often ask me, do you support amnesty? I don't. You see, and the reason I don't is because I'm afraid it would further illegal immigration, as well as rewards those who haven't lived to the law. We've got a lot of honest people who are trying to become citizens of the United States of America, who have stood in line for a long period of time, and it doesn't seem that we ought to have a worker system that allows somebody to cut in line. That's not fair. One of the things we are in America is we're fair. And people should -- people who have been in line shouldn't be penalized for having taken the legal route up to now.

    But one thing is for certain: We've got to respect people who are in our country. We've got to treat them with decency. And when the system is broke, we need to reform it. (Applause.)

    [ End ]


    White House

    President George W Bush

    Opening New Markets for America's Small Businesses
    Remarks by the President to the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
    Renaissance Hotel
    Washington, D.C.



    2:45 P.M. EST

    Comment


    • #3
      umm...no.

      Do you really think that a foreign worker, once given a temporary card will want to work at the same below average wage? And what about the health care they will request and Social Security?

      Comment


      • #4
        And when the system is broke, we need to reform it

        Since 1986, Congress has passed
        7 amnesties for illegal aliens.
        1. Immigration and Reform Control Act (IRCA) Amnesty, 1986: A blanket amnesty for some 2.7 million illegal aliens 2. Section 245(i) Amnesty, 1994: A temporary rolling amnesty for 578,000 illegal aliens 3. Section 245(i) Extension Amnesty, 1997: An extension of the rolling amnesty created in 1994 4. Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act (NACARA) Amnesty, 1997: An amnesty for close to one million illegal aliens from Central America
        5. Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act Amnesty (HRIFA), 1998: An amnesty for 125,000 illegal aliens from Haiti
        6. Late Amnesty, 2000: An amnesty for some illegal aliens who claim they should have been amnestied under the 1986 IRCA amnesty, an estimated 400,000 illegal aliens 7. LIFE Act Amnesty, 2000: A reinstatement of the rolling Section 245(i) amnesty, an estimated 900,000 illegal aliens 8. Eight current bills are vying to be Amnesty No. 8

        The economic downturn and the attacks of September 11th appear to have had no lasting impact on the pace of immigration. While there is some evidence that immigration may have slowed slightly in 2001, analysis of unpublished 2003 Census Bureau data by the Center for Immigration Studies shows that new legal and illegal immigration remains at record-setting levels.
        CAN YOU READ THIS E!!!
        In fact, immigration appears to be largely unconnected to the job market in the United States.
        YOU CAN B.S. SOME OF THE PEOPLE ,SOME OF THE TIME BUT THIS IS THE NUMBER ONE LIE!!!ardainia IS ON TO YOU!!!

        Although unemployment has increased significantly overall and among the foreign-born, the pace of legal and illegal immigration continues to match that of the late 1990s. The total foreign-born population reached 33.5 million in March of this year, a net increase of one million since 2002 and the highest number ever recorded in American history.
        Among the report's findings:
        "¢ Since 2000, 2.3 million new immigrant workers (legal and illegal) have arrived in the United States "” almost exactly the same as the 2.2 million who arrived during the three years prior to 2000, despite dramatic change in economic conditions.
        "¢ At the state level, there seems to be no clear relationship between economic conditions and trends in immigration. Immigration levels have matched or exceeded the pace of the late 1990s in Texas, New Jersey, Virginia, Maryland, Illinois, Arizona, Washington, North Carolina, Georgia, and New York "” even as all these states experienced a significant increase in unemployment.
        "¢ Nationally, about half (1.2 million) of those who arrived in each three-year time period (1997-2000 and 2000-2003) are estimated to be illegal aliens. These figures are only for those in the workforce who were captured in Census Bureau data.
        "¢ Looking only at the net increase in employment, the number of foreign-born adults (legal and illegal) holding a job has grown 1.7 million since 2000, while among natives the number working fell by 800,000.

        "¢ Although the number of foreign-born adults holding a job has increased since 2000, the number unemployed also increased, by 600,000, and unemployment rose among the foreign born from 4.9 to 7.4 percent.

        "¢ It is the very rapid growth in the foreign-born population that makes it possible for the number of immigrants holding jobs and the number unemployed to increase at the same time.

        The current economic slowdown represents a real-world test of the often-made argument that immigration is primarily driven by economic need in the United States. The fact that immigration has not slowed significantly since 2000, even though unemployment has increased significantly, indicates that immigration levels do not simply reflect demand for labor in this country. Rather, immigration is a complex process driven by a variety of factors, many of which have little to do with prevailing economic conditions in the United States. The idea that record levels of immigration in the 1990s were caused by a strong economy is a gross oversimplification and perhaps not even very helpful in understanding immigration. This does not mean that economic factors are entirely irrelevant. The higher standard of living of the United States in comparison to most sending countries certainly plays a central role in encouraging immigration. But a much higher standard of living exists even during a recession. For prospective immigrants, being unemployed or having to rely on the government or relatives in this country for support is still often better than life in the home country. Therefore, immigration is not a self-regulating process that rises and falls with the economy, nor should we expect it to be.

        Comment


        • #5
          "But one thing is for certain: We've got to respect people who are in our country. We've got to treat them with decency. And when the system is broke, we need to reform it. "

          I'll respect those who respect US--who abide by our laws and come legally.

          Comment


          • #6
            [acelaw quote]CAN YOU READ THIS E!!![end quote]


            acelaw:

            I think it would be too rude to call you an imbecile.
            But certainly I must say that you have reading problems. And very BIG time.

            The above post that you replied to is the speech by the President to the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce at Renaissance Hotel in Washington, D.C.

            Take some reading classes,acelaw. I personally doubt that anything will ever help you, but you should try at least.

            Comment


            • #7
              Again, I think Dubya is missing the point... basically, he's giving an incentive for people who entered illegally... He should instead concentrate on those people who are here legally or who want to come here legally.... Perhaps E should look at the processing time reports and see how long it takes for people who play by the rules. I am all for a special work visa for low-skilled workers. BUT THEY MUST COME IN OR BE HERE LEGALLY!!! To do otherwise is a slap in the face of those who respect the laws, as unfair as they are, of the U.S.

              Comment


              • #8
                NYCImmparalegal--I'm curious. Just how are U.S. immigration laws "unfair"?

                Comment


                • #9
                  I was rhetorically speaking with the "unfair." "Unfairness" is often a subjective perception. I personally do not think immigration laws are generally unfair. In fact, I think they are too generous in certain areas.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [NYCImmParalegal quote] I was rhetorically speaking with the "unfair." "Unfairness" is often a subjective perception [end of quote]

                    I agree,NYC.
                    This thread is not about fair,unfair laws, immigrants and etc.
                    Rather, it is a reminder that "we've got to respect people who are in our country".

                    To respect doesn't mean spoil.
                    It means to have regard for.
                    ______________________________

                    One day we may have a thread/discussion about something else, and I will contribute my opinion on it too.

                    By the way, note to NYC:

                    I am VERY WELL AWARE of "processing time reports and see how long it takes for people who play by the rules". Some very well, personally known to me pople have been going through this process for several years now and still have long way to go before arriving to the destination.
                    I don't see relevance of that to the subject of "Respecting PEOPLE who are in our country".

                    How does repecting PEOPLE IN OUR COUNTRY violate interests of those who wait for the processing of their application?

                    In fact, if you have read the whole speech of President Bush you would see that he made it clear that those who violated the law shouldn't rewarded at the cost of those who didn't violate.
                    I totally agree.

                    But one of his finale phrases were:
                    "But one thing is for certain: We've got to respect people who are in our country. We've got to treat them with decency...(Applause.)"


                    So, please, do not assume.
                    Read carefully first.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      E.--I have as much "regard for" illegal aliens as they do for us and our laws and our culture.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        As for Bush's comments--he sure didn't make any readily apparent distinction between illegal aliens and legal immigrants--probably because this is part of his electioneering. And what is his plan, but giving preferences in getting guestworker jobs to those who were in this country illegally?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [quote]This thread is not about fair,unfair laws, immigrants and etc.
                          Rather, it is a reminder that "we've got to respect people who are in our country".

                          To respect doesn't mean spoil.
                          It means to have regard for.
                          ______________________________

                          One day we may have a thread/discussion about something else, and I will contribute my opinion on it too.
                          [end of quote]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The above post that you replied to is the speech by the President to the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce at Renaissance Hotel in Washington, D.C.

                            Take some reading classes,acelaw. I personally doubt that anything will ever help you, but you should try at least.

                            E
                            Did Bush post this or did you???


                            To respect doesn't mean spoil.
                            It means to have regard for.

                            E
                            Is this the respect you talk about what a joke

                            Mexicans declare border war
                            Town pledges to clog U.S. court system with illegals
                            A Mexican border town has "declared war" on the United States, vowing to clog the U.S. court system with illegal immigrants, because, city officials say, the U.S. Border Patrol is dumping in their town Mexican nationals caught crossing the border illegally.
                            Officials from Agua Prieta, a Mexican city of about 130,000, are also claiming that the U.S.government has repeatedly neglected to inform them about new waves of immigrants before they are routed there from points in the U.S. after capture.
                            Consequently, Agua Prieta leaders are teaching Mexican nationals how to cross into the U.S. and stay there, by instructing them to request a court hearing -- a tactic sure to clog the judicial system with possibly thousands of illegal immigrants who want their day in court. Experts say that if only a small portion of illegal immigrants request court appearances, the system could be hopelessly clogged and the Border Patrol similarly overwhelmed.

                            -- World Net Daily, June 2000
                            Echoes of the Wild West in one man's border war
                            Douglas-area shooter takes on smugglers, nearly pays with life
                            By Michael Marizco
                            ARIZONA DAILY STAR
                            DOUGLAS - Richard Kozak had enough.
                            After two years of drug smugglers running their loads across his 40-acre property, tearing down fences and at times taking wild shots at him, Kozak on Wednesday fired back with more than his usual warning shots.
                            Authorities say the suspected smugglers reacted with a full attack on Kozak's cabin, in a sparsely populated area some four miles east of Douglas.
                            The smugglers' attack resulted in his home being struck with more than 30 shots from an AK-47 and a handgun.
                            His 24-foot trailer was set ablaze and Kozak said he's now wondering just how far he's willing to take this personal drug war.
                            Some Douglas residents - and soon-to-be illegal entrants in Agua Prieta - say they worry Wednesday's incident is indicative of the biggest fear of vigilantism are coming true - shootouts between Americans and illegal border crossers.
                            Others in the community say Kozak did nothing but defend his property, faulting instead an uncontrolled border.
                            Kozak, a 58-year-old Oregon native who moved to his 40-acre "slice of the American pie" two years ago from Huachuca City, says he will defend his home.
                            "What am I supposed to do? Wrap a fence around my cabin and hide in there?" he asked.
                            Kozak said he does not blame the illegal entrants who frequently walk through the gullies around his cabin, leaving him alone on their journey north.
                            His concern is the trucks racing across his land, their loads covered in tarps and the tail lights disconnected to avoid the attention of federal agents.
                            First he put up gates to try to stop the smugglers. After three $200 gates and spending hundreds more for fences and posts, Kozak gave up because they were simply knocked over by the trespassers.
                            Kozak moved on to other barricades, made of wood and barbed wire with danger signs.
                            That's when the shots started. The shooting then was random, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents told him they were happening because he was trying to stop drug loads.
                            Kozak responded with his own warning shots.
                            But Wednesday, when a maroon truck drove across his property, something in Kozak snapped.
                            He opened fire on the truck with his rifle, placing three rounds in the hood.
                            The truck raced away.
                            Meanwhile, Kozak parked his own truck sideways on the road to block their return path and went inside to fix himself a pot of coffee.
                            That's when the shooting started.
                            The first bullet hit the wall, destroyed the kettle on the stove. The next bullet went into the water heater, followed by three more shots that ripped into the house. One bullet hit a photo al***, passing through 20 pictures before stopping.
                            Kozak took cover, grabbed his rifle and went out the front door. The s******* were gone.
                            His travel trailer, set up sideways on the smuggler's route, was on fire. It's now a melted ruin of ash.
                            "That's the first time they ever unloaded that many rounds," he says. "They gave me a message and said, 'Don't shoot at us any more.'"
                            Officials agree.
                            "We kind of suspect that their reaction is to his firing on them," said Rod Rothrock, a commander with the Cochise County Sheriff's Department. "You could always expect violence to instigate violence."
                            He said his deputies have increased their patrols nearby. "We will do the best we can, but we're obviously not in a position to post a guard there," he said.
                            Ranch Rescue, the private militia that offers patrol services to ranchers along the border, wants to help to Kozak, said militia leader Jack Foote.
                            "This is the point that we reached, they're going to continue to attack American citizens and burn our homes down," he said.
                            Kozak has said he doesn't want it.
                            Douglas Mayor Ray Borane groaned when he heard of the shooting and that militia groups were eager to help.
                            "Ranch Rescue's been wanting this to happen and unfortunately, I don't believe they know the depth or magnitude of what could happen to them or the relations between both countries," he said.
                            "This is the beginning of what could become a series of confrontations," he said.
                            Jose Perez, a 36-year-old Mexican waiting to cross illegally from Agua Prieta Friday night, said the rumors that illegal entrants are targets reach all the way to Mexico City. "I hope nobody shoots at me," he said.
                            Dave Stoddard, a retired Border Patrol agent living in Douglas, looked at the shooting as an inevitable clash.
                            While he said Kozak shouldn't have fired first, smugglers shouldn't be running loads through his property, Stoddard said.
                            The Border Patrol's job was made more difficult by Kozak's forbidding them to enter his land, said Tucson Sector spokesman Andy Adame.
                            Kozak says he threatened the agency with an injunction because, like the smugglers, the agents kept cutting down his fences.
                            In the meantime, Kozak has loaded his important papers and bundles of clothes into his truck - just in case the smugglers torch his home next.
                            He said agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement have stopped by twice a day to check on him, but he knows they can't keep coming out.
                            Kozak said he plans to stick it out.
                            "Where should I go? A trailer court in Tucson?" he asked.
                            "I don't want to hurt anyone. But if someone shoots at me, I will defend myself."
                            Illegals stretch resources on border
                            Arizona's four border counties spent $15.5 million of taxpayers money last year capturing and prosecuting thousands of illegal immigrants who committed burglary, car theft and other crimes, according to new testimony on the high cost of the border crisis.
                            The cost to Arizona isn't being measured only in dollars: Testimony on Tuesday also warned of damage to national parks and riparian areas and an erosion of faith in the federal government's ability to solve the mounting border woes.
                            "I've never seen such a devastating, pervasive socioeconomic and environmental impact along the border," Cochise County Sheriff Larry Dever said after submitting a statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee. "Of all the damage being done, perhaps the greatest is the loss of confidence by our citizens that our government is willing or able to do anything about this situation."
                            "I think people will be very, very surprised that county governments endure such an impact," said Tanis Salant of the University of Arizona. "These are unreimbursed by the federal government. People need to realize that whatever is financed through the county general fund, it is local taxpayers bearing the burden."
                            The federal government is already paying millions of dollars a year for the cost of incarcerating illegal immigrants, but the tab is left to counties when immigrants commit other crimes. Sen. Jon Kyl said he is trying to prod the Senate into reimbursing counties more for emergency medical care and other services

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Acelaw,

                              Do you pretend to be THAT smart, or are you?

                              E:"RESPECT PEOPLE IN OUR COUNTRY = DO NOT TRY TO MAKE PEOPLE INTO HATING EACH OTHER, TREAT EVERYONE WITH DUE REGARD, DO NOT SPOIL THEM EITHER". What part of what I have said you do NOT understand?

                              Now, If ANY individual (and I care not if it be Mexican, American or what else Nationality) crosess someone's PRIVATE PROPERTY, DESTROYS AND LOOTS it, SMUGGLES DRUGS or runs PEOPLE smuggling rings, then THAT INDIVIDUAL IS A CRIMINAL, and must be treated, prosecuted and punished as such.

                              But I see there a distinction between those individuals who come here to commit crimes, and those who come here to do constructive/hard work.
                              Latter, if working here without EAD, are in violation of law too, but there is a great distinction between a bloody murderer and a guy who speeds on highway for some reason.
                              Nobody says you must award a high-way speeding guy with tons of prizes and pedestal of honor instead of a ticket, big fine and possible court day.
                              But it is just equally senseless to say: "HM, this guy who speeded on highway is Mexican. And the guy we caught yesterday, the murderer, was also Mexican. So, let's just make it a crime: being a Mexican.And we will punish, treat all those MEXICANS the same way, like marauding murderers, no matter if they were really marauding or just speeding on highway.
                              HM, smart us!!!
                              HM, smart AX-LAW!!"

                              UNLIKE YOU ,Acelaw, I don't say : "Hey look, I've got X-number of criminal Mexicans here: let's now use these guys to portray ENTIRE MEXICAN NATION as a NATION OF MARAUDERS, so we can advance our anti-mexican, anti-immigrationist agenda and punish all Mexicans for the crimes of some!!!Oh, what a SMART AX-LAW I AM!! OH, WHAT A SMART AX-LAW I AM!! AND NO ONE EVER WILL NOTICE !!! ALL I GOT TO DO IS COPY-PASTE AS MANY BAD ARTICLES ABOUT IMMIGRATION AND IMMIGRANTS AS I COULD!!! NOONE WILL NOTICE HOW I USE CERTAIN NUMBER OF CRIMINAL MEXICANS TO DISCREDIT ENTIRE NATION !!! OH, WHAT A SMART AX-LAW I AM!!! OH, WHAT A SMART AX-LAW I AM!!"

                              I told you before, Acelaw, that with reasoning such as yours you are better off wearing bearskin, hunting beasts with swinging AX in your hands.
                              Obviously, it would be a disaster to let you run the political affairs: nothing short of resentful and vengeful extremist would come out of you.

                              As to me-I choose the other path.

                              I say, as President Bush does: "We've got to respect people who are in our couyntry.We've got to treat them with decency".

                              Good luck.

                              Comment

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