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Beware of Fake Amnesty Scams

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  • Beware of Fake Amnesty Scams

    IT seems that the scam artists are at it again: tricking People into applying for Amnesty under CSS/LULAC, with the promise of obtaining work authorization.To these people' horror, they are now receiving interview notices from USCIS on their amnesty applications, and are going through sleepless, tearful nights, knowing that their future in America may now be even more in jeopardy.
    By way of background, there was an amnesty program available to aliens who had actually entered the U.S. before January 1, 1982, and had lived in the United States continuously since that date.

    The Catholic Social Services (CSS) and the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) later brought lawsuits over the way in which Legacy INS was handling the amnesty program.Eventually these cases were settled, and qualified applicants had until December 31, 2005 to submit their amnesty applications.

    The scam artists, with their smooth talking, convinced many people to apply for the amnesty, even though the people were not eligible.These consultants convinced their victims that the consultants knew more about immigration law than licensed attorneys, and were aware of these little known "short cuts." Some aliens were charged anywhere from $2,500 to $5,000 for the consultant "services."

    Applications were submitted containing false information, especially the date that the alien entered the U.S. (which had to be before January 1, 1982).Although the aliens may have obtained work authorizations, they are now receiving interview notices on their amnesty applications.To make matters worse, their ÒtrustedÓ consultants have disappeared.

    When these aliens receive their interview notice, they are in a panic. Let's look at some of the problems they will face in trying to pursue (or prove they are eligible for) this fake amnesty claim:

    -The law requires that the alien must have been in the U.S. before January 1, 1982.So, if an applicant was born in the 1970s, they would have to have entered the U.S. when they were a small child, like 8 or 9 yrs. old.How did they get here at such an early age?What have they been doing all those years?

    -Many of these same amnesty applicants went to college and graduated in their home country after 1982.How could they have been in the U.S. since January 1982 (to be eligible for the amnesty), yet attend school in their country years later?

    -Many of these people had children in their home country after January 1982.Their children's birth certificates, listing them as the parent, are public records, which USCIS can obtain. How could they have lived in the U.S. "continuously" since 1982, yet give birth (or father children) in their home country?

    -Most of these People applied for, and were issued visas, at their U.S. Embassy after January 1982.How could they be applying for a visa at the Embassy after 1982, when they were supposedly in the U.S. since 1982?

    These are just a sampling of the contradictions and problems that these people now have with their cases, and some of the few ways that DHS is going to be able to "catch" them in their lies.They now have a record with DHS that may affect their future ability to legalize their status legally.

    If you had applied for a fake amnesty, I would highly recommend that you seek the advice of a reputable attorney, who can evaluate your situation, and see if there are legitimate ways for you to legalize your status.Remember, if something sounds too good to be true (such as a quick work authorization with no strings attached), believe me, there are plenty of life-long strings attached, which could result in deportation/removal.

  • #2
    IT seems that the scam artists are at it again: tricking People into applying for Amnesty under CSS/LULAC, with the promise of obtaining work authorization.To these people' horror, they are now receiving interview notices from USCIS on their amnesty applications, and are going through sleepless, tearful nights, knowing that their future in America may now be even more in jeopardy.
    By way of background, there was an amnesty program available to aliens who had actually entered the U.S. before January 1, 1982, and had lived in the United States continuously since that date.

    The Catholic Social Services (CSS) and the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) later brought lawsuits over the way in which Legacy INS was handling the amnesty program.Eventually these cases were settled, and qualified applicants had until December 31, 2005 to submit their amnesty applications.

    The scam artists, with their smooth talking, convinced many people to apply for the amnesty, even though the people were not eligible.These consultants convinced their victims that the consultants knew more about immigration law than licensed attorneys, and were aware of these little known "short cuts." Some aliens were charged anywhere from $2,500 to $5,000 for the consultant "services."

    Applications were submitted containing false information, especially the date that the alien entered the U.S. (which had to be before January 1, 1982).Although the aliens may have obtained work authorizations, they are now receiving interview notices on their amnesty applications.To make matters worse, their ÒtrustedÓ consultants have disappeared.

    When these aliens receive their interview notice, they are in a panic. Let's look at some of the problems they will face in trying to pursue (or prove they are eligible for) this fake amnesty claim:

    -The law requires that the alien must have been in the U.S. before January 1, 1982.So, if an applicant was born in the 1970s, they would have to have entered the U.S. when they were a small child, like 8 or 9 yrs. old.How did they get here at such an early age?What have they been doing all those years?

    -Many of these same amnesty applicants went to college and graduated in their home country after 1982.How could they have been in the U.S. since January 1982 (to be eligible for the amnesty), yet attend school in their country years later?

    -Many of these people had children in their home country after January 1982.Their children's birth certificates, listing them as the parent, are public records, which USCIS can obtain. How could they have lived in the U.S. "continuously" since 1982, yet give birth (or father children) in their home country?

    -Most of these People applied for, and were issued visas, at their U.S. Embassy after January 1982.How could they be applying for a visa at the Embassy after 1982, when they were supposedly in the U.S. since 1982?

    These are just a sampling of the contradictions and problems that these people now have with their cases, and some of the few ways that DHS is going to be able to "catch" them in their lies.They now have a record with DHS that may affect their future ability to legalize their status legally.

    If you had applied for a fake amnesty, I would highly recommend that you seek the advice of a reputable attorney, who can evaluate your situation, and see if there are legitimate ways for you to legalize your status.Remember, if something sounds too good to be true (such as a quick work authorization with no strings attached), believe me, there are plenty of life-long strings attached, which could result in deportation/removal.

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