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  • I need advice on how to bring my wife to the states

    I just got married this month to my wife in Korea.. I live in the states and she lives in Korea. Before our marriage we never lived together and shortly after our marriage i had to return to the states because of work and my apartment. After our marriage we spent every night together till i left for the states and i know what color her tooth brush is (pink)and also that she grinds her teeth very loudly when she sleeps(lol read a couple of the other threads.) Our marriage is for real... i am returning to Korea in June when my lease ends to live with her till she gets her visa but i want to file the I-130 now so that we get an early start. We would like to return to the states in Sept. Because i start school that month and then live together her till i finish school and then return to Korea forever. I have no real proof other than a joint bank account here in the states, affidavit's from friends and family. our marriage certificate signed and notarized by the consulate at the US Embassy in Seoul. She does not want to be a US Citizen nor do i want her to i just want to be able to live with her here in the states until we can return to Korea. Once i finish school and return to Korea, I am going to become a Korean Citizen and give up my US citizenship. What should i do, what do i need? what type of visa can she get that allows her to work while we live here? Any advise is helpful thanks

  • #2
    I just got married this month to my wife in Korea.. I live in the states and she lives in Korea. Before our marriage we never lived together and shortly after our marriage i had to return to the states because of work and my apartment. After our marriage we spent every night together till i left for the states and i know what color her tooth brush is (pink)and also that she grinds her teeth very loudly when she sleeps(lol read a couple of the other threads.) Our marriage is for real... i am returning to Korea in June when my lease ends to live with her till she gets her visa but i want to file the I-130 now so that we get an early start. We would like to return to the states in Sept. Because i start school that month and then live together her till i finish school and then return to Korea forever. I have no real proof other than a joint bank account here in the states, affidavit's from friends and family. our marriage certificate signed and notarized by the consulate at the US Embassy in Seoul. She does not want to be a US Citizen nor do i want her to i just want to be able to live with her here in the states until we can return to Korea. Once i finish school and return to Korea, I am going to become a Korean Citizen and give up my US citizenship. What should i do, what do i need? what type of visa can she get that allows her to work while we live here? Any advise is helpful thanks

    Comment


    • #3
      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by MARRIED2AKOREAN:
      I just got married this month to my wife in Korea.. I live in the states and she lives in Korea. Before our marriage we never lived together and shortly after our marriage i had to return to the states because of work and my apartment. After our marriage we spent every night together till i left for the states and i know what color her tooth brush is (pink)and also that she grinds her teeth very loudly when she sleeps(lol read a couple of the other threads.) Our marriage is for real... i am returning to Korea in June when my lease ends to live with her till she gets her visa but i want to file the I-130 now so that we get an early start. We would like to return to the states in Sept. Because i start school that month and then live together her till i finish school and then return to Korea forever. I have no real proof other than a joint bank account here in the states, affidavit's from friends and family. our marriage certificate signed and notarized by the consulate at the US Embassy in Seoul. She does not want to be a US Citizen nor do i want her to i just want to be able to live with her here in the states until we can return to Korea. Once i finish school and return to Korea, I am going to become a Korean Citizen and give up my US citizenship. What should i do, what do i need? what type of visa can she get that allows her to work while we live here? Any advise is helpful thanks </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
      First, congratulations on your marriage. If you are going to bring your wife over, you will need to file the I-130. When she comes, she does not have to become a USC automatically nor is there any requirement for an immigrant to become a USC, JFYI. After a certain time of living in this country, she can choose to become a USC. Click Here to learn more about the process and good luck.
      "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

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      • #4
        How to bring your wife to the US? Put her in an airplane. Unless she lives in Mexico who can walk to cross the border, she needs to take a ship or plane. Funny...but I'm sure j e r k s like Someone12 would find my comment and joke funny. That's what they want to hear. But seriously speaking, the best thing to do is to seek the professional advice of a lawyer. People here have limited knowledge and what you get are just free opinionated information.

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        • #5
          Do you know what it would take for you to receive either Korean alien registration card or long term Korean visa? If one has that, I-130 can be filed in at the US embassy in Korea instead of USA, and the whole process is much shorter.
          Anyway, it seams that if you file I-130 now, your wife may be in the States by the end of the year or sooner. After the completition of the process, she would receive CR-1 immigrant visa, and a green card shortly after arrival.
          She can also go for K-3 (you file I-129 after I-130), which is non-immigrant visa and would have to complete the process (adjust status) in the US. K3 used to be faster than IR/CR-1, but not lately...so check those 2 (3 if you are Korean resident) options and see which best suits you.

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          • #6
            Korea seems to be the less favored nations. With North Korean agents all over the South, the US is warry of Korean immigrants these days.

            Comment


            • #7
              <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by aneri:
              Do you know what it would take for you to receive either Korean alien registration card or long term Korean visa? If one has that, I-130 can be filed in at the US embassy in Korea instead of USA, and the whole process is much shorter.
              Anyway, it seams that if you file I-130 now, your wife may be in the States by the end of the year or sooner. After the completition of the process, she would receive CR-1 immigrant visa, and a green card shortly after arrival.
              She can also go for K-3 (you file I-129 after I-130), which is non-immigrant visa and would have to complete the process (adjust status) in the US. K3 used to be faster than IR/CR-1, but not lately...so check those 2 (3 if you are Korean resident) options and see which best suits you. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
              My understanding is that he still needs a processed I-130 to get the CR-1 visa irregardless of whether one has a Korean Resident card or not. Well, that is what the Dept of State Web Site indicates. Furthermore, if he was a US soldier stationed in Korea, she would have to give up her Korean residency card so that she can move to the US.

              As for long processing times with a Korean, that is now rare, except with with military aspect. It is now with China and India that are delayed because of security clearance.
              "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

              Comment


              • #8
                I was at one time a service man in Korea but i have not been in the military for the last two years now... and actually as far as NIV's are concerned South Korea has one of the highest approval ratings of any country in the world.. like 95%... so you guys think it would be faster for me to do the whole thing over there? or should i file the I-130 like tomorrow...? I don't know? i mean i don't have to start school this fall but i really would like to... if i have to wait another year ..it's just one more year i have to spend in the states.. but as far as Korean visa's are concerned the have a F-2 visa that is basically a long term family visa that i am in the process of getting to go back in June.. Korea is so much easier than the states... it's like 4 forms and then congratulations here is your visa.. why can't the states be like that?

                Comment


                • #9
                  <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by MARRIED2AKOREAN:
                  I was at one time a service man in Korea but i have not been in the military for the last two years now... and actually as far as NIV's are concerned South Korea has one of the highest approval ratings of any country in the world.. like 95%... so you guys think it would be faster for me to do the whole thing over there? or should i file the I-130 like tomorrow...? I don't know? i mean i don't have to start school this fall but i really would like to... if i have to wait another year ..it's just one more year i have to spend in the states.. but as far as Korean visa's are concerned the have a F-2 visa that is basically a long term family visa that i am in the process of getting to go back in June.. Korea is so much easier than the states... it's like 4 forms and then congratulations here is your visa.. why can't the states be like that? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
                  File the I-130 with the National Visa Center so that your spouse can come on a CR-1 or K3 visa. Follow the instructions on the link I provided in the first reply.
                  "Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams on Defense of the boston Massacre

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Hudson:
                    My understanding is that he still needs a processed I-130 to get the CR-1 visa irregardless of whether one has a Korean Resident card or not. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                    That's correct. The difference is wheather he can only file I-130 in the US through USCIS service center (longer process, but can start it now) or also has an option of submitting I-130 at the US consulate in Korea (simplier and shorter process, has to be resident there, can't do it before June...). The result is CR/IR-1 visa either way.

                    M2K, if you deacide to file I-130 at the consulate in Korea, check out if there are any additional requirements (like time spent in Korea) besides being a resident there. I am just giving you an additional option to what Hudson already wrote.

                    Do you know which is your USCIS Service center? How long does it take them to process I-130?
                    https://egov.immigration.gov/cris/js...d=bGnEP10mPNjg

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      He can not file through the Consulate in Korea, stopped that.

                      So the route is K3/CR1 - see www.visajourney.com if you want to DIY or get a Immigration Lawyer to do it for you.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Theone:
                        He can not file through the Consulate in Korea, stopped that. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

                        Why not if he gets that F2?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          yeah...looks like direct fillings of I-130 at US embassies have been put on hold.

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