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an convention refugee can be deported ?

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  • #16
    Check Mira, Massachusetts Immigrant and refugee Advocacy Coalition. www.miracoalition.org
    or email flopez@miracoalition.org with questions. Althogh it's an advocacy group for Massachsetts residents you mind email with questions or see if they have a forum on their site. Lutheran Services might also be able to give you some advise.

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    • #17
      <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by explora:
      Check Mira, Massachusetts Immigrant and refugee Advocacy Coalition. www.miracoalition.org
      or email flopez@miracoalition.org with questions. Althogh it's an advocacy group for Massachsetts residents you mind email with questions or see if they have a forum on their site. Lutheran Services might also be able to give you some advise. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>that's something constructive
      thank you
      roco

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      • #18
        Cocorocotum,
        Forgot to mention www.shusterman.com
        There's many headings and subheadings you can click on to retrieve a wealth of info on green cards, deportation, waiting times, citizenship, nurses, and more! Very informative. I think you'll appreciate it.

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        • #19
          <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by explora:
          Cocorocotum,
          Forgot to mention www.shusterman.com
          There's many headings and subheadings you can click on to retrieve a wealth of info on green cards, deportation, waiting times, citizenship, nurses, and more! Very informative. I think you'll appreciate it. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>nothing. about refugee deportation
          roco

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          • #20
            roco,
            Sorry you didn't find anything. I thought I saw something about asylum but maybe it didn't contain much info. They state on the site (Shusterman) you can contact them about a consultation. I don't know, it might be free. Have you found anything on the web anywhere regarding your question? Later in my web browsing I'll keep my eyes peeled for you.

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            • #21
              I have a dream...a Somali squatter camp in Martha's Vineyard.

              The Somali Bantu (also called Jarir, Jareer, Wagosha or Mushunguli) are an ethnic minority group in Somalia. They are the descendants of people from various Bantu ethnic groups in what is today Tanzania, Malawi and Mozambique who were brought to Somalia as slaves in the 19th century. At the beginning of the 20th century, slavery in Somalia was abolished by the Italian colonial administration; they continued to be despised and discriminated by parts of the Somali society. Contrary to the Somali, who are mainly nomadic herders, the Bantu are mainly sedentary farmers. They may have darker skin than the lighter skinned Somalis.

              In 2000 the United States classified the Bantu as a priority and began preparations for resettlement to select cities throughout the United States, among those it is known that Salt Lake City, Utah received about 1,000 of the refugees. In New England, Manchester, New Hampshire and Burlington, Vermont have received influxes of Bantus.

              Though currently limited to no more than 15,000 individuals, Somali Bantu have direct clan relationships with at least 100,000 others in Somalia. Every refugee flow that the U.S. government has initiated suggests that it is realistic to expect that most of these 100,000 people will eventually make it to the United States one way or another. Another one million Bantus live in Somalia, many of whom can be expected to try to emigrate. Whenever a group is designated as favored for resettlement to the United States, the group attracts large numbers of new members. According to study author David Martin, former General Counsel of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, those who are not in any danger in their home country arrange to adopt the selected group's characteristics, even moving to a refugee camp if that increases chances of resettlement to the United States.

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