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Pakistani group urges compliance with INS.

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  • Pakistani group urges compliance with INS.

    Human rights advocates launched a campaign Wednesday to
    urge
    visitors and foreign workers in the United States to keep authorities
    informed of their addresses.

    As of Oct. 1, the Immigration and Naturalization Service began
    enforcing a
    50-year-old law that requires all non-citizens to report any change of
    address within 10 days.

    "Failure to comply with the law is a misdemeanor, punishable by a $200
    fine, and/or up to 30 days in prison and can constitute a violation of
    one's immigration status making one subject to deportation," says a
    message
    distributed by the National Council of Pakistani American.

    So far Pakistanis top the list of immigrants arrested and deported
    after
    the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Pakistani rights groups say that many
    of
    them were "victims of ignorance," who violated the laws because they
    were
    not aware of them.

    Several Arab and Indian groups also have sent similar messages to the
    people from their parts of the world, reminding them of the changes in
    immigration laws and practices.

    The new restrictions apply to all legal permanent residents including
    green
    card holders, people on political asylum and refugees.

    Non-citizens with valid non-immigration visas, such as students,
    visitors
    and alien workers also have to keep INS informed of their whereabouts.

  • #2
    Human rights advocates launched a campaign Wednesday to
    urge
    visitors and foreign workers in the United States to keep authorities
    informed of their addresses.

    As of Oct. 1, the Immigration and Naturalization Service began
    enforcing a
    50-year-old law that requires all non-citizens to report any change of
    address within 10 days.

    "Failure to comply with the law is a misdemeanor, punishable by a $200
    fine, and/or up to 30 days in prison and can constitute a violation of
    one's immigration status making one subject to deportation," says a
    message
    distributed by the National Council of Pakistani American.

    So far Pakistanis top the list of immigrants arrested and deported
    after
    the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Pakistani rights groups say that many
    of
    them were "victims of ignorance," who violated the laws because they
    were
    not aware of them.

    Several Arab and Indian groups also have sent similar messages to the
    people from their parts of the world, reminding them of the changes in
    immigration laws and practices.

    The new restrictions apply to all legal permanent residents including
    green
    card holders, people on political asylum and refugees.

    Non-citizens with valid non-immigration visas, such as students,
    visitors
    and alien workers also have to keep INS informed of their whereabouts.

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