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Lets hear from all folks from all countries that are here breaking our laws and good will for even letting you come TO visit, lots of nations won't, or get an education, MOST WON'T LET YOU , which you sign a promise to leave when your time expirie

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  • Lets hear from all folks from all countries that are here breaking our laws and good will for even letting you come TO visit, lots of nations won't, or get an education, MOST WON'T LET YOU , which you sign a promise to leave when your time expirie

    TO ALL AND SKS
    Lets hear from all folks from all countries that are here breaking our laws and good will for even letting you come TO visit, lots of nations won't, or get an education, MOST WON'T LET YOU , which you sign a promise to leave when your time expiries,or cross your Border illegaly. WHAT WOULD HAPPEN TO ME IF I WENT TO YOUR HOME LAND AND ACTED THIS WAY??? YEARS IN JAIL, FINES , BEATINGS ETC ????

  • #2
    TO ALL AND SKS
    Lets hear from all folks from all countries that are here breaking our laws and good will for even letting you come TO visit, lots of nations won't, or get an education, MOST WON'T LET YOU , which you sign a promise to leave when your time expiries,or cross your Border illegaly. WHAT WOULD HAPPEN TO ME IF I WENT TO YOUR HOME LAND AND ACTED THIS WAY??? YEARS IN JAIL, FINES , BEATINGS ETC ????

    Comment


    • #3
      "Lets hear from all folks from all countries that are here breaking our laws and good will for even letting you come TO visit, lots of nations won't, or get an education, MOST WON'T LET YOU , which you sign a promise to leave when your time expiries,or cross your Border illegaly. WHAT WOULD HAPPEN TO ME IF I WENT TO YOUR HOME LAND AND ACTED THIS WAY??? YEARS IN JAIL, FINES , BEATINGS ETC ???"

      Who cares? I, frankly, am not very concerned about how other countries handle their immigration issues. I can't answer your question because I do not know immigration law in such countries as Phillipines, England, India, etc. Are they efficient? Do they have the ability to track people down? Do they face the same amount of immigration as the U.S.?

      Comment


      • #4
        Reply to your question acelaw:
        I lived in 3 countries so far and I had to deal with immigration all the time.It has never ever been so difficult as it is in US.Never had problems extending a visa or receiving legal work permit.
        What you forget to mention acelaw is that immigration laws in US sometimes makes no sense and there are a lot of loops in it.They made me illegal!!!!!I did everything I suppose to,even got married while in status.Never worked 'cos my visa didn't allow me,don't even have a drivers license.
        And now married to a USC the BCIS still doesn't allow me to adjust my status because my visa type.And I still don't work or drive.
        I'm here because Ihave a husband who I love very much and he doesn't wanna move to another country.
        Something like this would never ever happen in a foreign country!!!!!!Once you're married to a citizen they allow you to have a normal family life.
        Immigration laws in this country unfortunately hurting those who are in bona fide marriages,they haven't done anything illegal until there messed up laws make them to.
        I also understand where you coming from Acelaw!!But don't you think maybe it's time to make some changes in the immigration laws.
        The countries where I used to live you do not get away(specially millions of people)with being illegal but they give you the chance NOT TO become illegal!!!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          One more thing Acelaw!!!
          Certain undocumented aliens,whom are eligible for specific laws have more privileges and rights than a USC!!!!!This is the frustration that my husband tries to deal with and it is NOT easy!!!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Certain undocumented aliens,whom are eligible for specific laws have more privileges and rights than a USC!!!!!This is the frustration that my husband tries to deal with and it is NOT easy!!!!!

            And if you read my posts thats what I fight against, why should some one be able illegaly decide for those who live and those that try and do it legal, they have no right to do that. Then add injury to insult, my taxes have to pay for it. It also makes folks say, Hey this is not fair so I will just do as they do, I understand that, it brings all this corruption with it.We try to stop it and we are raciest????


            This article was sent to me, it is a good example of how people take advantage of our system,

            The Agandas entered the country on tourist visas in 1990, opened a dry cleaning store near Yakima, then sought to stay.

            which is not perfect, but with so many who are trying to beat the system, it affects folks who are trying to do it legal, place the blame where it belongs, this system worked fine until over run with people trying to fraudulently come here, overstaying visa ETC..., then asking for adjustments ,all this creates a mess, they created the work for these folks and the delays because of the sheer volume of these type actions and I pay the costs, then blame us for the problem??? We have to investigate each one of these cases, for all our safety, so we have increased spending here, MY TAXES and the Fees you pay to try and make it better. Do you have over a million per year legal trying to come to those countries that you speak of??? Then add the 500,000 PLUS illegals that they must also deal with and what do you except??? A BIG MESS. That's why we have immigration laws to limit the flow and the problems that unregulated immigration brings, if you all would like to pay say$1000.00 per application , then we could employ a lot more people , is it our fault you had the wrong type visa?I suport folks trying to do it right, but you had the wrong visa and you have what you think is a very good case in your mind , just like all the others think their case and reasons are just as valid for breaking our laws. Thus it ruins it for every one. How can an immigration officer play god, your reason is OK, yours is not??? I do not want that happening, so to be fair as possible to all, we have to have one law for all,so it may not seem fair but how else do you do it?? but when you pick chose what you will obey, then the system breaks down and that is what is happening.

            While I sympathize with this family for their health problems that does not excuse the fact that they entered America and then failed to live up to the agreement made upon entry. Instead they opened a dry cleaning establishment and decided they were going to STAY in violation of the *tourist* visa that they entered on. That is FRAUD in my book.

            I wonder how many LEGAL AMERICANS Rep. Clements and Skinner have gone to *bat* for for the same reasons they have this illegal immigrant family. Take the SAME set of circumstances (health problems) and see how many defense funds get set up to help LEGAL Citizens.

            I am sure there are many LEGAL families in Rep. Clements district who could use the clout of Clement's office and his efforts to meet with aides of the President to help them.

            Read the last lines of the article to see that this is another sham being played by these ILLEGALS. Another ploy to stay in America (with the full assistance of US government political officials) in violation of the LAW.

            EMOTIONS overruling the LAW - once again.

            Jackie
            WGEN


            http://www.tribnet.com/news/local/st...-3793238c.html

            Filipino family granted last-minute stay of deportation

            JOHN K. WILEY; The Associated Press

            SPOKANE - A federal judge granted a 60-day stay of a Filipino family's deportation on Monday, a day before the husband, wife and daughter were scheduled to leave the country.

            U.S. District Judge Edward Shea in Richland issued the order after attorneys representing Judy Aganda argued her health would not permit her to be deported. She has been treated for brain cancer.

            The order is the latest twist in a decade-long quest by Tomas, Judy and Jennylyn Aganda to remain in the United States.

            "We had a victory today," State Rep. Jim Clements (R-Yakima) said by telephone after the ruling. "The judge decided we might talk about all the legal rights, but the last thing he wanted to consider was her last rites."

            The stay allows supporters of the Agandas to regroup, Clements said.

            "We're going to get a defense fund, and we're going to go to bat for them," he said.

            Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman Garrison Courtney said the agency would comply with the court order.

            The Agandas' lawyer, Jeff Webster of Seattle, did not immediately return a call for comment Monday afternoon.

            Tomas, 55, Judy, 48, and Jennylyn, 15, surrendered their passports in Seattle last Monday after the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against them.

            They had purchased one-way tickets to the Philippines.

            The Agandas entered the country on tourist visas in 1990, opened a dry cleaning store near Yakima, then sought to stay.

            Supporters' pleas to allow the family to remain in the country for humanitarian reasons went all the way to the White House.

            Clements and Rep. Mary Skinner, another Yakima Republican, worked with the state's congressional delegation to try to block the Agandas' deportations.

            Clements obtained an audience with an aide to President Bush to talk about the case when the chief executive visited the state last week.

            More than 4,000 people signed petitions asking officials to grant a stay while Judy Aganda recovers. But the newly renamed immigration bureau - formerly the Immigration and Naturalization Service - said it has proof that Judy Aganda's medical treatment could continue in the Philippines.

            "She's not getting treatment for brain cancer any more. The mother merely requires MRI scans to determine whether the cancer has reappeared," Courtney said from the agency's headquarters in Washington, D.C., prior to Shea's ruling. "Her last treatment was in February. We've talked to the Public Health Service and oncologists, and they say it's OK to move her."

            (Published 12:01AM, August 26th, 2003)

            Comment


            • #7
              YOU ARE STILL FULL OF S H I +

              Comment


              • #8
                Hey look at me Im ACELAW I can cut and paste



                MemberMember
                posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.


                posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                Member
                posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                Member
                posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                Member
                posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                Member
                posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                Member
                posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hey look at me Im ACELAW I can cut and paste



                  MemberMember
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.


                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                  Member
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                  Member
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                  Member
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                  Member
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                  Member
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                  Hey look at me Im ACELAW I can cut and paste



                  MemberMember
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.


                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                  Member
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                  Member
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                  Member
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                  Member
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                  Member
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                  Hey look at me Im ACELAW I can cut and paste



                  MemberMember
                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                  "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                  "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                  MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                  According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                  Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                  Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                  "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                  But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                  "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                  "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                  Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                  Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                  Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.


                  posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                  LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                  The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                  MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could sp

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hey look at me Im ACELAW I can cut and paste



                    MemberMember
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.


                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                    Member
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                    Member
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                    Member
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                    Member
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                    Member
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                    Hey look at me Im ACELAW I can cut and paste



                    MemberMember
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.


                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                    Member
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                    Member
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                    Member
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                    Member
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

                    Member
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
                    Hey look at me Im ACELAW I can cut and paste



                    MemberMember
                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could spell political ruin for a white candidate and are upset that little attention has been paid to Bustamante's relationship with the group. He belonged to MEChA while attending Fresno State University in the 1970s.

                    "Whatever you did in your youth, it's what you did at time. You can't disassociate from past," said Manuel Olgin, a former MEChA member and now a counselor at the university. "Now if you're still plugged in and doing stuff, that's a another question. But this is immaterial to me."

                    "Joining MEChA was a right of passage just like if a black student joined a black student union. And if you didn't join, you weren't Chicano. The question is why hasn't he renounced it now. It is racist organization," said radio talk show host Larry Elder.

                    MEChA has as many as 300 chapters in universities across the U.S., with 100 of them in California alone.

                    According to the organization's constitution, "Chicanas and Chicanos must ... politicize our Raza (race) ... and struggle for the self-determination of the Chicano people for the purpose of liberating Aztlan."

                    Aztlan (search) is the area that is currently the southwest United States, but Mechistas claim Aztlan is their homeland to be returned to Mexico and the group says white Americans who currently govern these areas must be removed from power.

                    Bustamante, the grandson of Mexican immigrants, who counts improving race relations among his biggest pursuits, has not responded to Fox News' questions regarding his connection to MEChA, but some of his contemporaries from the group say he was moderate, not militant.

                    "His involvement in MEChA was not in a leadership position. His involvement was in being a member and doing what he could. He was involved at a higher level and that level was in student government," said Tony Garduque, a former MEChA member, who said the group did a lot of good things.

                    But that explanation doesn't wash with critics.

                    "What is a moderate member of a racist organization? 'I was a moderate member of the Klan.' Imagine if a Republican made that statement," Elder said.

                    "I think he should answer for his membership in the group," said syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin. "I think he needs to explain why he has not disassociated himself from a group that is violent, which has caused riots on campus and which has preached anti-Semitism and anti-black ideology."

                    Bustamante left Fresno State early and finished his degree by taking correspondence classes. He was honored by the school last year at age 49 during a Hispanic-only graduation ceremony.

                    Though he defines his "racial ethnic agenda" as one that provides good schools, good jobs and safe neighborhoods, Bustamante has been questioned before about racism. In 2001, he had to apologize profusely to state African-American leaders after mistakenly referring to a black union using the N-word. Bustamante called it a slip of the tongue, but audience members attending the Black History celebration were stunned at the reference, for which he did not apologize until the end of his 10-minute speech.

                    Racist or not, critics say Bustamante's membership in MEChA is certainly more relevant than Arnold Schwarzenegger's father being a Nazi. Schwarzenegger uncovered that truth when he initiated his own search in 1990 of his father's past with the help of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.


                    posted August 27, 2003 09:39 PM
                    LOS ANGELES "” Critics are wondering why Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante (search), who is running to be governor of California, hasn't renounced his association to a little-known Hispanic organization that they say is as racist as the Ku Klux Klan.



                    The Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, or MEChA (search), has used violence in the past to make its case. In 1996, members of the group, who call themselves Mechistas, were videotaped attacking illegal immigration protesters. In 1993, students at UCLA caused $500,000 damage during protests to demand a Chicano studies department. MEChA has also been associated with anti-Semitic groups like Nation of Aztlan.

                    MEChA's motto is "for the race, everything. For those outside the race, nothing." Critics say affiliation with that kind of group could sp

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