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  • LeoBosanquet
    replied
    When it comes to PPF warranty details, Mum Sports doesn't leave you guessing. Their website provides clear insights into the warranty coverage for their PPF products. It's reassuring to know that you're protected when you choose Mum Sports for your vehicle's paint protection needs.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    just sending this to the front of the line!!!!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    you might be interested in briefly scanning this.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    .

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    and thanks to you to afriend... you have been a major support throughout this whole mess!!!!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    rpc, you are definitely right... if I weren't half as sane as I am I would have told my husband to just come back in over the border (but I am sane...).

    I do tend to agree with you. The times that I have been given are 9 months. My personal opinion is that the "official" time is 1 1/2 - 2 years, but (even the "nice Ecuadorian INS" lady said) times can vary. My guess, and my hope, is that they give you the longer times in order to keep people from calling and complaining, etc.

    However, I am so tired of waiting. Sometimes I just get so frustrated... but I am sure that you can understand!!!

    I have already started looking into getting residency/working in Canada and I think I have a job lined up this summer in Ecuador (at least enough to entertain me if not pay me well - by US standards).

    I am trying not to get my hopes up... it seems like everytime I do, something happens to crush them. But I guess that is life.... but I really do appreciate your words, they do help to keep that spark of hope alive (and it is so important)!!!!!

    Also, if you guys really have to go by the embassy for any reason (i.e. to ask a question or other stupid thing)remember that my husband lives in Guayaquil, and I will be there in March and over the summer (mid-May, June, July, to mid-Aug.) and would be more than happy to help you out in any way possible (even going by the embassy... actually I think my husband made "friends" with one of the guards, and might even be giving her English classes sometime this year, so they aren't all bad!!!)

    And if you feel bad about it - remember when I go down there I don't have a "real" job, I only have his friends and family, and I generally have no money... so it gets kind of boring. An errand might even help to entertain me

    Anyway, I know what a hassle and a mess this is!! If there is anything we can do to help you guys out (due to our proximity to the embassy, etc.) just let us know!

    And please please please keep me up to date on your case!

    Good luck and hang in there!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I am so sorry to hear this. I will be going down this road soon. I know the person told you it would take 1.5-2 years to process your 601, but I would question this. You and I know, when calling the INS service line, we get different answers, dont ask me why, lack of training? Lack of respect on their part? It's a fact, 3 different calls will give you 3 different answers to the same question. I also know the same applies for the consulate at Quayaquil. My wife called them once asking if she could get a tourist visa to visit me, they told her YES, she needs to apply and she would be granted it. This is false, even if she some how was granted it, at the POE she would surley be denied. She called again, different week and asked and this time was told the correct answer. And when she does call, the people are rude and dont want to talk or answer questions, they tell her if she has questions to come to consulate. Lets see, 5+ hour bus ride, hours waiting in line, bus ride back home...for what? For them to answer you question incorrectly and be rude to your face.

    The lawer who i spoke with (in CT) who has processed 601's for ecuadorians and brazilians say the average time is 6-9months. And yes, all his 601's have gone through Ecuador. Maybe things have changed. I'm not saying call until you get the answer you want, but dig around the net, compare times to other consulates. I wonder if consulate could give you hard figures, are the 601 public information?
    But I would be damned to stay away from my son, my wife for 2+ years more.
    I am closely following your case, as it parallels mine.
    If it really is going to take the time you said, I would be start looking for other country to live in that would accept you and your family.

    This burns so much, this is what makes illegal boarder crossing an option.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Dear Spouse,

    I am sorry to hear the disappointments, I know it's easy for me to say to cheer up, but my prayers are with you. God's miracle can happen
    anytime.

    I've heard that US consulate processed the i-601 longer, but here's some for you.

    http://britishexpats.com/forum/showt...hreadid=124598

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hi. I said I would let you guys know how my interview in december went. Unfortunately, I am more than a little disheartened, so this will not be very detailed.

    First, to make it clear, we expected to be denied and told to file the I-601.

    However, it was not really an interview. We arrived at 6:30 in the morning and the building opened at 7:00 (there was already a line.) We then waited (standing because there were no more seats) until about 1:00pm until we were called for our "first interview" at which time we went up to a bank teller style window and gave the appropriate documents to an very nice Ecuadorian woman.

    We were then told to leave and go to lunch and return for the "next interview" (getting lunch was very nice) we returned in about an hour and were among just a few people that were waiting and were called relatively promptly. Again we returned to a bank teller type window and were told that my husband needed to file the waiver (this we knew) but for the 10 year bar (as he was only officially assigned a five year bar we had hoped that he would not be given the 10 year bar.) They then told us that the we had to file for fingerprints which (unlike in the USA where they require only a few hours to process) would take about 3-4 months to get the results back from the fingerprints and that we were unable to file until after the fingerprints were returned. Almost no questions were asked and the gentleman (American) that spoke to us didn't even know that five year bars existed. He was very short and rude and frankly I think he somewhat enjoyed giving us bad news.

    We were sent back to our seat and then called again for something else... back to another bank teller window to talk to the very nice Ecuadorian lady that informed us that in guayaquil ecuador they process all of the waivers for both ecuador and brazil which means that the average wait time was a year and a half to two years (which we had been expecting to be 6 months to a year).

    All of his was through the department of state which has little to no contact with the department of justice or INS.

    We returned a different day and talked to another Ecuadorian woman that worked with the INS while we were fingerprinted. She was very nice.

    Needless to say I was very disturbed. We had expected to have a year to a year and a half (not counting the year that we lost due to our lawyers untimely death) including everything (example the I-130 which was approved in 6 months). We had also expected them to adhere to the assigned bar of five years meaning that even if the waiver was turned down we would still have a chance to be together within a reasonable amount of time (although I am still somewhat unclear as to whether the DOS actually has the ability to decide which bar is applicable.)

    What we walked out of the "interview" with was knowledge that in addition to the six months approval for the I-130, we have to wait 3-4 months for the fingerprint results and 1 and a half to two years for notice as to whether or not our I-601 has been approved. Which brings us to a total of two and a half years to threee years (not counting the wasted year caused by the death of our previous lawyer) to find out whether or not my husband can even come back into the country. Which if he cannot will mean that we will then have 6-7 years to spend without him being admitted to this country.

    I have no idea what I am going to do for the next couple years of my life while we are waiting. I have applied to one of the best graduate schools (in my area) in the USA for my doctoral degree. If I do not stay at my current school or go there my options are to work for the state department (oh irony...) or to declare bankruptcy, move to ecuador, and teach english as a foreign language.

    all I really want is to finish my doctoral degree, let my husband finish his USA college degree (he is already working on it via a special school in Ecuador that is affiliated with a community college in New Jersey and with the University of South Carolina and the University of Florida and credits that are transferable to any other school in the usa). I want to live with my husband and have a child.

    Is it so hard to be a contributing member of the United States? Do they really want me to declare bankruptcy? Oh well... I will have have to decide what to do later... but that is the news for now

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic interview

    interview

    Hi. I said I would let you guys know how my interview in december went. Unfortunately, I am more than a little disheartened, so this will not be very detailed.

    First, to make it clear, we expected to be denied and told to file the I-601.

    However, it was not really an interview. We arrived at 6:30 in the morning and the building opened at 7:00 (there was already a line.) We then waited (standing because there were no more seats) until about 1:00pm until we were called for our "first interview" at which time we went up to a bank teller style window and gave the appropriate documents to an very nice Ecuadorian woman.

    We were then told to leave and go to lunch and return for the "next interview" (getting lunch was very nice) we returned in about an hour and were among just a few people that were waiting and were called relatively promptly. Again we returned to a bank teller type window and were told that my husband needed to file the waiver (this we knew) but for the 10 year bar (as he was only officially assigned a five year bar we had hoped that he would not be given the 10 year bar.) They then told us that the we had to file for fingerprints which (unlike in the USA where they require only a few hours to process) would take about 3-4 months to get the results back from the fingerprints and that we were unable to file until after the fingerprints were returned. Almost no questions were asked and the gentleman (American) that spoke to us didn't even know that five year bars existed. He was very short and rude and frankly I think he somewhat enjoyed giving us bad news.

    We were sent back to our seat and then called again for something else... back to another bank teller window to talk to the very nice Ecuadorian lady that informed us that in guayaquil ecuador they process all of the waivers for both ecuador and brazil which means that the average wait time was a year and a half to two years (which we had been expecting to be 6 months to a year).

    All of his was through the department of state which has little to no contact with the department of justice or INS.

    We returned a different day and talked to another Ecuadorian woman that worked with the INS while we were fingerprinted. She was very nice.

    Needless to say I was very disturbed. We had expected to have a year to a year and a half (not counting the year that we lost due to our lawyers untimely death) including everything (example the I-130 which was approved in 6 months). We had also expected them to adhere to the assigned bar of five years meaning that even if the waiver was turned down we would still have a chance to be together within a reasonable amount of time (although I am still somewhat unclear as to whether the DOS actually has the ability to decide which bar is applicable.)

    What we walked out of the "interview" with was knowledge that in addition to the six months approval for the I-130, we have to wait 3-4 months for the fingerprint results and 1 and a half to two years for notice as to whether or not our I-601 has been approved. Which brings us to a total of two and a half years to threee years (not counting the wasted year caused by the death of our previous lawyer) to find out whether or not my husband can even come back into the country. Which if he cannot will mean that we will then have 6-7 years to spend without him being admitted to this country.

    I have no idea what I am going to do for the next couple years of my life while we are waiting. I have applied to one of the best graduate schools (in my area) in the USA for my doctoral degree. If I do not stay at my current school or go there my options are to work for the state department (oh irony...) or to declare bankruptcy, move to ecuador, and teach english as a foreign language.

    all I really want is to finish my doctoral degree, let my husband finish his USA college degree (he is already working on it via a special school in Ecuador that is affiliated with a community college in New Jersey and with the University of South Carolina and the University of Florida and credits that are transferable to any other school in the usa). I want to live with my husband and have a child.

    Is it so hard to be a contributing member of the United States? Do they really want me to declare bankruptcy? Oh well... I will have have to decide what to do later... but that is the news for now
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