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  • Five Immigration Myths Explained

    Five Immigration Myths Explained

    Regardless of the reasons for immigrating, myths still abound regarding immigrants once they arrive in the United States. Now's the time to separate some of this fact from fiction.

    Myth Number 1: Immigrants take jobs away from Americans.

    Myth Number 2: America is being overrun by immigrants.

    Myth Number 3: Most immigrants are a drain on the U.S. economy.

    Myth Number 4: Immigrants aren't really interested in becoming part of American society.

    Myth Number 5: Immigrants contribute little to American society.



    Myth Number 1: Immigrants take jobs away from Americans.
    Nothing could be further from the truth. Studies have shown that quite the opposite is true: Immigrants create jobs. Specifically various recent studies have shown that:


    Immigrants are more likely to be self-employed and start new businesses. Small businesses, 18 percent of which are started by immigrants, account for up to 80 percent of the new jobs available in the United States each year.
    Slightly more than 10 percent of the U.S. industrial workforce, or roughly 2.2 million Americans, are employed by foreign companies doing business in the United States. Additionally, the top 105 multinational corporations doing business here have U.S. affiliates that are so large they would qualify for the Fortune 500 list solely on the basis of their stateside operations.



    Myth Number 2: America is being overrun by immigrants.
    This, unfortunately, is another case where perception is out of sync with reality. To be sure, the number of immigrants living in the United States is larger than ever before, but these numbers are relatively small as a percentage of the population. More importantly, the percentage of immigrants in the total population has decreased. So far, no single decade has topped 1901-1910 for immigration admissions. Further, even though the United States has one of the world's most generous refugee resettlement programs, less than 1.5 percent of the world's refugee population finds its way to the United States.

    Perhaps the misperception regarding numbers of immigrants rests in the fact that in the 1980s, three-quarters of all immigrants entering the United States settled in just six states: California, New York, Texas, Florida, New Jersey, and Illinois. Also, the vast majority of immigrants settle in urban areas. In 1990, 93 percent of foreign-born Americans lived in metropolitan areas, compared with 73 percent of native-born Americans.



    Myth Number 3: Most immigrants are a drain on the U.S. economy.

    Once again, nothing could be further from the truth:


    Immigrants collectively earn $240 billion a year, pay $90 billion a year in taxes, and receive $5 billion in welfare.
    New immigrants must prove that they won't be a burden before they are allowed to enter the United States. Compared to the native-born population, immigrants are more likely to be employed, save more of their earnings, and are more likely to start new businesses.
    Immigrants have a slightly higher per capita income than natives and a slightly lower household income. But, their income levels rise over time: Among those entering before 1980, median household income in 1989 was $35,733 (vs. $30,176 for natives) and per capita income was $19,423 (vs. $14,367 for natives).
    Non-refugee immigrants of working age are less prone to welfare than natives.



    Myth Number 4: Immigrants aren't really interested in becoming part of American society.
    All evidence points to the contrary. Immigrants are very interested in being part of our society. In fact, the grandparents and parents of immigrant children have expressed some concern that their youngsters are assimilating too quickly.


    Immigrants want to learn and speak English. Reports from throughout the United States indicate that the demand for classes in English as a second language far outstrips supply. After 15 years in America, 75 percent of Spanish-speaking immigrants speak English on a regular basis. The children of immigrants, although bilingual, prefer English to their native tongue at astounding rates.
    Immigrants and refugees intermarry outside their group at a rate of 1 in 3. The rate is even higher, 1 out of 2, for their children.



    Myth Number 5: Immigrants contribute little to American society.
    Baloney. Besides their significant economic contributions, immigrants continually have helped shape and mold the fabric of our society.


    Immigrants, for the most part, are firm believers in family unity. They are more likely than natives to live in families: 76 percent vs. 70 percent. They also tend to have more children: 2.25 vs 1.93. Immigrants are more likely to be married: 60 percent vs. 55 percent. Only 8 percent of immigrants are divorced or separated compared to 11 percent of natives.
    Immigrants recognize the value of an education. While many lack a high school education, they are just as likely as natives to hold a college degree: 20 percent. That rate rose during the 1980s: Among those admitted in 1987-1990, 29 percent held a college degree. Immigrants are also twice as likely as natives to hold Ph.D.'s.
    Immigrants respect the law as much, if not more, than native born Americans. They are less likely than natives to be confined to a state prison. Among the five states with the most immigrants--California, Florida, Illinois, New York, Texas--only New York has a greater share of immigrants in its prisons than in its general population.
    So, who are these people we call immigrants? They could be your parents, your grandparents, your teachers, your friends, your doctors, your policemen, your grocer, your waiter, your cook, your babysitter, your gardener, your lawyer, your favorite actor, actress, or sports hero, your mayor, your congressman or senator, your shopkeeper. Immigrants permeate the fabric of America. They are an integral and important part of our society, its goals and its values. They are the backbone that helps make this country great. They are what sets us apart from every nation in this world. In short, they are us.

    http://www.aila.org/contentViewer.as...7,142#section1

  • #2
    Five Immigration Myths Explained

    Regardless of the reasons for immigrating, myths still abound regarding immigrants once they arrive in the United States. Now's the time to separate some of this fact from fiction.

    Myth Number 1: Immigrants take jobs away from Americans.

    Myth Number 2: America is being overrun by immigrants.

    Myth Number 3: Most immigrants are a drain on the U.S. economy.

    Myth Number 4: Immigrants aren't really interested in becoming part of American society.

    Myth Number 5: Immigrants contribute little to American society.



    Myth Number 1: Immigrants take jobs away from Americans.
    Nothing could be further from the truth. Studies have shown that quite the opposite is true: Immigrants create jobs. Specifically various recent studies have shown that:


    Immigrants are more likely to be self-employed and start new businesses. Small businesses, 18 percent of which are started by immigrants, account for up to 80 percent of the new jobs available in the United States each year.
    Slightly more than 10 percent of the U.S. industrial workforce, or roughly 2.2 million Americans, are employed by foreign companies doing business in the United States. Additionally, the top 105 multinational corporations doing business here have U.S. affiliates that are so large they would qualify for the Fortune 500 list solely on the basis of their stateside operations.



    Myth Number 2: America is being overrun by immigrants.
    This, unfortunately, is another case where perception is out of sync with reality. To be sure, the number of immigrants living in the United States is larger than ever before, but these numbers are relatively small as a percentage of the population. More importantly, the percentage of immigrants in the total population has decreased. So far, no single decade has topped 1901-1910 for immigration admissions. Further, even though the United States has one of the world's most generous refugee resettlement programs, less than 1.5 percent of the world's refugee population finds its way to the United States.

    Perhaps the misperception regarding numbers of immigrants rests in the fact that in the 1980s, three-quarters of all immigrants entering the United States settled in just six states: California, New York, Texas, Florida, New Jersey, and Illinois. Also, the vast majority of immigrants settle in urban areas. In 1990, 93 percent of foreign-born Americans lived in metropolitan areas, compared with 73 percent of native-born Americans.



    Myth Number 3: Most immigrants are a drain on the U.S. economy.

    Once again, nothing could be further from the truth:


    Immigrants collectively earn $240 billion a year, pay $90 billion a year in taxes, and receive $5 billion in welfare.
    New immigrants must prove that they won't be a burden before they are allowed to enter the United States. Compared to the native-born population, immigrants are more likely to be employed, save more of their earnings, and are more likely to start new businesses.
    Immigrants have a slightly higher per capita income than natives and a slightly lower household income. But, their income levels rise over time: Among those entering before 1980, median household income in 1989 was $35,733 (vs. $30,176 for natives) and per capita income was $19,423 (vs. $14,367 for natives).
    Non-refugee immigrants of working age are less prone to welfare than natives.



    Myth Number 4: Immigrants aren't really interested in becoming part of American society.
    All evidence points to the contrary. Immigrants are very interested in being part of our society. In fact, the grandparents and parents of immigrant children have expressed some concern that their youngsters are assimilating too quickly.


    Immigrants want to learn and speak English. Reports from throughout the United States indicate that the demand for classes in English as a second language far outstrips supply. After 15 years in America, 75 percent of Spanish-speaking immigrants speak English on a regular basis. The children of immigrants, although bilingual, prefer English to their native tongue at astounding rates.
    Immigrants and refugees intermarry outside their group at a rate of 1 in 3. The rate is even higher, 1 out of 2, for their children.



    Myth Number 5: Immigrants contribute little to American society.
    Baloney. Besides their significant economic contributions, immigrants continually have helped shape and mold the fabric of our society.


    Immigrants, for the most part, are firm believers in family unity. They are more likely than natives to live in families: 76 percent vs. 70 percent. They also tend to have more children: 2.25 vs 1.93. Immigrants are more likely to be married: 60 percent vs. 55 percent. Only 8 percent of immigrants are divorced or separated compared to 11 percent of natives.
    Immigrants recognize the value of an education. While many lack a high school education, they are just as likely as natives to hold a college degree: 20 percent. That rate rose during the 1980s: Among those admitted in 1987-1990, 29 percent held a college degree. Immigrants are also twice as likely as natives to hold Ph.D.'s.
    Immigrants respect the law as much, if not more, than native born Americans. They are less likely than natives to be confined to a state prison. Among the five states with the most immigrants--California, Florida, Illinois, New York, Texas--only New York has a greater share of immigrants in its prisons than in its general population.
    So, who are these people we call immigrants? They could be your parents, your grandparents, your teachers, your friends, your doctors, your policemen, your grocer, your waiter, your cook, your babysitter, your gardener, your lawyer, your favorite actor, actress, or sports hero, your mayor, your congressman or senator, your shopkeeper. Immigrants permeate the fabric of America. They are an integral and important part of our society, its goals and its values. They are the backbone that helps make this country great. They are what sets us apart from every nation in this world. In short, they are us.

    http://www.aila.org/contentViewer.as...7,142#section1

    Comment


    • #3
      WHO ARE AMERICAN? ALL THE AMERICAN EXCEPT THE NATIVE INDIAN ARE IMMIGRANTS, THERFORE, NOBODY CAN SAY ANY THING AGAINST IMMIGRANTS.

      Comment


      • #4
        My granparents were legal immigrants. Does that make me, second generation American-born, an immigrant? We all need to stop looking back one hundred years or more and focus on the present. What are illegal contributing? Do their contributions outweigh the liabilities of their presence here? Is their contribution to the labor pool more important than the billions of untaxed dollars they send home? These are questions that are pertinent, not whether the sins of the past should be revisited or worse, recommitted. We Americans and America's legal residents need to examine these issues. Stay focused.

        Comment


        • #5
          That's what is required to regularize the illegals's paper work so that they are liable to pay their taxes. To keep them out side the tax law is not the answer.

          Comment


          • #6
            Vito ,you are right.Keeping them out of the country is the only answer. All of the latest information shows that they will never in their lifetime or their childrens lifetime be able to make up what they are costing us every day.It should be easy to see that the states with the most illegals have the biggest budget problems. Due to the fact that they have no education, they wii only get minimum wage jobs. But they have many many children,even though they cannot afford them. That is our fault because they know they don't have to pay medical bills here so they keep on having kids. I don't understand how they can think that that is alright to do. Most Americans wait until they can afford children. With the exception of welfare people. And they are usually the uneducated also. These people usually are not concerned with their childrens education. Mexicans have the highest dropout and failure rate in the country. It must be their culture because Asians who come here not speaking the language are at the top of their classes in a years time.They all tend to go to college and get good jobs, and then pay taxes. Mexicans on the other hand cost us $65,000each every 10 years they are here. We cannot afford to let them stay here. It is sad they have a bad life in mexico, but they should stay there and change things. They will never be better there until some mexicans start to do something instead of running away and having Americans take care of them

            Comment


            • #7
              This is our land .
              You all are occupying our land by force.
              you do not have rights to discuss such issue.
              ask your conscious .
              Red Indians

              Comment


              • #8
                Have you ever thought of why US doesn't simply shut down its door given the efficiency of the great democracy if the problems of immigration, legal or illegal, are so devastating and obvious? Why? maybe, it's just a maybe, the lawmakers, adnimistration officials, business leaders, you know, the "elite" people who run this country and have made this the most sucessful nation in recent human history know better? Of course you think these are the dumb asses, but hey, they successfully made this the greatest nation, I say good job and will stick with them and their ideas

                Comment


                • #9
                  Elite, You could not be more wrong. The reason the elite don't say anything is because it is their business that is exploiting the dirt cheap labor. And most of all they live in gated areas where they don,t have to have them living in their neighborhoods. Their kids go to private school,not the ones overrun with mexicans who can,t learn. Their walls aren't spray painted time and time again. They don't live next door to 30 people in one house,with 5broken down cars outside(uninsured)They don't have to wait 5hours in an emergency room because there are 95 mexicans in there using it as a free clinic. THAT is why they don't say anything. If they ever have to live next to one (or 30)they will have the army on the border with machine guns

                  Comment

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