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US Consulates On Allegations Of Illegal Visa Sales

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  • #31
    Hey, Miami, why don't you post the link?

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    • #32
      I don't see why these immigrants are in such a huff over what Mr. Cintron and Mr. Rico did. . They should be forgiven and allowed to "adjust" their "illegal" status. After all , they were just trying to give some people a chance at a better life. If it weren't for the "bad" US immigration laws, they wouldn't have had to break the law and commit fraud. Sound familar??? It should. It's the same lame argument that all the illegals and overstayers ect. give every time they are caught. Now they can see how we Americans feel when they try that lame one on us.

      Comment


      • #33
        Guest6, get out!

        Comment


        • #34
          WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Assistant Attorney General Michael Chertoff of the Criminal Division and United States Attorney Michael Shelby of the Southern District of Texas announced today that four former employees at the U.S. Consulate in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, have pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit visa fraud.

          The four defendants – former visa adjudicator Miguel Partida and former visa clerks Sergio Genaro Ochoa-Alarcon, Benjamin Antonio Ayala-Morales, and Ramon Alberto Torres-Galvan – entered their guilty pleas before U.S. District Court Judge Keith P. Ellison today at federal court in Laredo, Texas. They had been charged in one-count criminal informations with conspiracy to sell visas.

          The four defendants face a maximum five years in prison as a result of their guilty pleas. Sentencing will be determined at a later date. Partida, 41, was arrested Feb. 5, 2003, but has been released on bail. Ochoa-Alarcon, 31, Ayala-Morales, 34, and Torres-Galvan, 34, have been in custody since their arrests on Jan. 30, 2003. Sentencing for all four defendants is scheduled for June 12, 2003.

          The guilty pleas arose from a criminal investigation that began approximately seven months ago, and ultimately resulted in the closure of the U.S. Consulate office in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, on Jan. 29, 2003. As part of a plea agreement, the defendants are cooperating with an ongoing criminal investigation.

          According to documents filed at federal court in the Laredo Division of the Southern District of Texas, federal agents initiated the investigation after allegations that consulate employees were involved in a scheme to provide visas and border crossing cards in exchange for money. The scheme involved people buying visas without required interviews, and without the required determination that a person was qualified for a visas. The duties of the four men who pleaded guilty included interviewing applicants for U.S. visas, reviewing the applications, and approving non-immigrant visas for travel to the United States.

          "Today's pleas are especially critical in light of our efforts to secure our borders and protect the national security," said Assistant Attorney General Michael Chertoff. "Those who sell entry to the United States for their own profit will be caught and punished."

          The investigation into visa fraud at the Nuevo Laredo Consulate is being conducted by Special Agents of the Diplomatic Security Service, United States Department of State, and Special Agents of the newly created Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security. The criminal case is being prosecuted by Trial Attorney Peter Zeidenberg of the Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Public Integrity Section; Jim Oliver of the Criminal Division's Domestic Security Section; and Assistant United States Attorney Dixie Morrow of the Laredo Division office of the United States Attorney for the Southern District of Texas.

          Comment


          • #35
            Many of you folks heard about what happened at the end of January: a couple of folks at the Western Service Center were finally indicted for something they did last year. It seems they were discovered to be illegally shredding many legal documents at the California Service Center... actually, as many as 90,000 documents. The shredding wasn't undertaken by INS federal officers, but rather by private contractors - private company employees who, under contract with the federal government, carry out the mail room operations.

            According to the various news sources citing what has been learned, the manager of the Western Service Center mail room one Dawn Randall, 24 years old was indicted at the end of January by a federal grand jury, along with a supervisor who worked under her, Leonel Salazar, 34 years of age. Both were accused of ordering low-level employees to destroy thousands of documents beginning in February of 2002 and continuing several months thereafter. The purpose: to reduce a growing backlog of unprocessed paperwork that the Western Service Center was facing.

            I don't know how many of you folks remember back to 2002 and what was going on with the INS, but the Western Service Center is not a location where Lorenzo, Kim, and I file a great deal of cases. However, I do remember experiencing a little bit of confusion as to the expediency with which they were able to suddenly get "current." Now we know what happened: apparently (and according to the indictment) Ms. Randall ordered her subordinates at the INS to count the number of unprocessed papers in the filing center. They indicated to her that about 90,000 documents were waiting to be handled. According to the report, she ordered at least five night shift workers to begin shredding many boxes of these papers. By the end of March, no backlog existed, amazingly. Ms. Randall ordered the subordinates to treat the incoming paper with this innovative policy, making sure the backlog was avoided. The INS supervisors, unaware of the details, must have been happy, and so was everyone, except those poor folks whose stuff was being destroyed. And what exactly was being shredded? Good question:

            U.S. passports

            Foreign passports

            Asylum applications

            I-140 petitions

            I-129 petitions

            Employment authorization requests

            Original birth certificates

            Advanced parole requests

            Applications for U.S. citizenship
            Pretty much anything you can think of that goes through a service center office was destroyed, and not just the applications, but original documentation that is virtually irreplaceable, depending on what country the person comes from. Obviously, there was no INS policy to substantiate this, as the poor U.S. attorney tasked with explaining this to the press pointed out. Instead, this was just the whim of several individuals deciding that they were sick and tired of looking at mountains of papers.

            Now, I'm not defending the INS, or justifying their lack of supervision over this catastrophic event, but it's important to point this out: this was not the act of career INS service center officers, but the act of contractors.

            So what are federal contractors? They are private corporations who, under agreement with federal contracting standards, obtain lucrative contracts to provide certain services to the federal government, where it is supposedly more cost-effective to do so. So who was this contractor? That's where things get really interesting...

            According to the New York Times, the company in charge of servicing not just the Western Service Center but all four INS Service Centers is called JHM Research and Development, a Maryland corporation. The owner? A fellow named John H. Macklin, who is the President of JHM. The New York Times apparently tried to contact Mr. Macklin but had no luck. Small wonder... I dug further, and check this out...

            According to the company's website, JHM Research & Development, Inc., was incorporated in 1987 under the laws of the district corporation. The self-described company profile includes the following statement:

            "The company is a wholly owned and operated minority enterprise certified by the Minority Business Opportunity Commission of the Small Business Administration (SBA) and the State of Maryland."

            Aha! That told me a lot: based on what are informally known as federal "set asides," the federal government HAS to give business to minority-owned contractors whenever possible. JHM is one such provider. Specifically, JHM appears to be an African-American owned business, based on it's advertising in www.melanet.com, described on its home page as "The Uncut Black Experience". For $45 a year, Mr. Macklin runs his ad on Melanet, "seeking cooperative relationships with 'Majority-owned' firms as well as other 'Minority-owned" firms." Check it out at:

            http://www.melanet.com/mebc/minority_directory

            Back at their homepage, the company's profile then goes on to talk extensively about JHM basing its corporate philosophy on the Tenet of Quality Management (TQM). Now, without taking a cheap shot at the company, as a pretty devout student of the Japanese- rooted tenets of TQM, it was pretty hard for me to swallow their lingo regarding "a responsive organization" and top-to-bottom "commitment to quality" when:

            the head of the company (or at least a spokesperson) is unavailable to major media given a catastrophic event like this

            the organization couldn't even figure out that 90,000 cases were destroyed at the hands of one of their employees.

            That, folks, is not adherence to TQM, anyway you cut it.

            But what was more disturbing to me was what was pointed out within the New York Times article: according to the article, the contract awarded through the minority-granted JHM Research & Development of Maryland is actually carried out by two sub-contractors. Neither of these was identified in either the New York Times article, the JHM website, nor anything else I could find. Why, I wondered?

            I made a call to an old friend who knows a lot about federal contracting, and his understanding is that the only subcontracting a designated minority firm can do is to other minority-owned firms. My own reading of the rules is different: the whole reason for the complex regulations associated with federal contracting registration as a minority-owned company is to ensure opportunity for disadvantaged companies; it is not something one can "convey" to others at will. In fact, I found there is an entire industry which caters to registering such minority-owned companies to do business with the Federal Government. Check this out:

            http://www.ezcertify.com

            I'm assuming that these two subcontractors comport to the minority award definitions upon which this massive contract had to be awarded...

            I did mention to you that the award granted to Mr. Macklin's corporation was $325 million, didn't I? (-;

            I went back to the JHM client's website to find out what other companies they were serving. Check out this list:

            U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

            Food and Drug Administration

            Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms

            National Institutes of Health
            That was just the list of current clients. According to their website, the "new contract awards" included the Service Center Operations (remember, $325 million contract), National Institutes of Health (two contracts), Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (three contracts), and a host of prior contracts including the FBI, USDA, NOAH, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Department of Commerce, and others.

            Quite an impressive list of clients and clearly a massive and impressive history of success. Obviously an organization with this level of activity must be employing thousands of minority workers, truly taking advantage of the federal purpose of minority contracting, stimulating the economy throughout the many regions in which it is involved, right? This company must be a regular font of job generation for his own African-American community, as well as for other minorities, a real example for the job generation responsibilities which fall upon the shoulders of those of us who are successful minority entrepreneurs, right?

            Well, I'm not so sure: imagine my surprise when I clicked on the employment opportunities icon at www.jhmrad.com and found this line:

            "No positions available at this time."

            We lack the investigative reporting resources (and budget) of the New York Times, but, damn...$325 million dollar contract, no response from the company, two mystery subcontractors and 90,000 shredded files??? Here are the questions this Caribbean cowboy needs answered:

            Who are the two subcontracting companies carrying out the contract awarded to JHM?

            Where is JHM management, and where and how have they supervised the contractor activities carried out at the Service Centers, and why won't they explain what has happened and how this was possible, nearly a year later?

            Did JHM ever have the capacity to carry out the INS Service Center contracts, or for that matter, any other contracts, or does it simply "farm out" contracts to other ventors?

            If the answer to the preceding question is "No," is that permissible under GSA and federal contractor guidelines?

            Are the "heirs" to the contract awarded to JHM registered with the Federal Government as minority contractors themselves, pre- approved, or are the funds "set aside" for disadvantaged businesses going to other companies?

            What kind of profits does JHM make as a result of the federal contracts it receives?

            Has the U.S. Government reviewed other JHM contracts based on the California Service Center fiasco to see if this can happen in other existing contracts, given that the company has done nothing to explain what it has done to address the situation?

            And the real question I want answered:

            If, with all these contracts and all this money, there are "no positions available at this time," how many minority men and women has JHM hired in, say, the past five years?

            Let's see some W-2s, a press release, an acknowledgment on your website of how you blew it and what you are doing to not blow it again. Let's see some accountability, Mr. Macklin. You've built a hell of a company, but you owe a lot of people an explanation. If you truly believe in TQM as I do, enough of "talking the talk" ...it's time to "walk the walk."



            http://www.usvisanews.com/memo2035.html

            Comment


            • #36
              An employee of the Department of Homeland Security, and formerly the INS, was indicted Wednesday on charges that he took bribes from undocumented immigrants to issue fraudulent employment authorization documents.

              According to the Dallas Morning News, Anthony Fitzgerald Brown, 33, of Lancaster, Texas, was charged with one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States and to commit bribery in connection with identification documents, the Justice Department said.

              Brown could face up to 380 years in prison and a $6.5 million fine if convicted.

              Also charged in the indictment was Nadeem Ahmed, 38, and Salim Noorani, 43. Both face one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States and commit bribery and fraud in connection with identification documents.



              http://www.visalaw.com/03apr3/13apr303.html

              Comment


              • #37
                Thread goes up...

                Comment


                • #38
                  WASHINGTON, D.C.- Assistant Attorney General Michael Chertoff of the Criminal Division and McGregor W. Scott, United States Attorney for the Eastern District of California announced today that a federal grand jury in Sacramento returned an 18-count indictment charging nine persons, including two former State Department employees, in connection with an alleged corrupt scheme, operating out of the U.S. Embassy in Sri Lanka, to sell entry visas to the United States.

                  The indictment followed the arrests of eight of the nine defendants and searches at five locations in three states. According to a 130-page complaint unsealed in Sacramento yesterday, the scheme allegedly involved the payment of hundreds of thousands of dollars by persons in Sacramento and elsewhere to two married State Department employees between 2000 and 2003, in exchange for the issuance of visas to various foreign nationals, primarily from Vietnam and India.

                  The complaint further alleges that Acey R. Johnson, while working in the consular affairs section of the U.S. Embassy in Sri Lanka, issued visas to scores of persons pursuant to the scheme.

                  The indictment charges all nine defendants with conspiring to defraud the United States and to bribe public officials and to commit visa fraud. The charged defendants are: Long N. Lee, 51, a State Department Foreign Service Officer and career State Department employee; Acey R. Johnson, 32, who is married to Long N. Lee and was until recently a Consular Associate employed in the consular section of the U.S. Embassy in Sri Lanka; Vinesh Prasad, 33, of Sacramento; his brother Minesh Prasad, 28, of Sacramento; Narinderjit Singh Bhullar, 40, of Sacramento; his brother Davinder Singh Bhullar, 44, of India; Phuong-Hien Lam Trinh, 35, of Torrance, California; Rajwant S. Virk, 46, of Herndon, Virginia; and Rachhpal Singh, 32, of Hayward, California. The indictment also charges some of the defendants with additional charges. The status of the defendants is as follows:

                  Acey R. Johnson, 32, who was until recently a Consular Associate employed in the consular section of the U.S. Embassy in Sri Lanka, was arrested on the morning of Tuesday, April 29, 2003, at his home in Port Orford, Oregon by Special Agents with the Diplomatic Security Service of the U.S. State Department ("DSS") and the FBI. He appeared in U.S. District Court yesterday in Medford, Oregon, and was ordered detained pending further proceedings in Medford on Monday, May 5, 2003 at 1:30 p.m.

                  Long N. Lee, 51, a State Department Foreign Service Officer and career State Department employee, who is married to defendant Johnson, was arrested at Dulles International Airport yesterday evening after being escorted from the U.S. Embassy in Colombo, Sri Lanka to the United States by DSS agents. She is scheduled to appear today at 2:00 p.m. before a U.S. Magistrate Judge in Alexandria, Virginia. Long had been the chief administrative officer at the Embassy.

                  Vinesh Prasad, 33, and Minesh Prasad, 28, of Sacramento, were arrested Tuesday morning, April 29, 2003, at their home in Sacramento. They appeared yesterday before a Magistrate Judge in Sacramento, and were ordered detained pending further proceedings on Wednesday, May 7, 2003, at 2:00 p.m.

                  Narinderjit Singh Bhullar, 40, of Sacramento, was arrested Tuesday morning at his home in Sacramento. He appeared before a Magistrate Judge that same day, and was scheduled to appear again for further proceedings today at 2:00 p.m. in Sacramento.

                  Phuong-Hien Lam Trinh, 35, of Torrance, California, was arrested Tuesday morning at her home in Torrance. She appeared yesterday before a Magistrate Judge in Los Angeles, who ordered her released upon the posting of bail in the amount of $100,000 secured by real property. She was ordered to appear in Sacramento on Friday, May 9, 2003, at 2:00 p.m.

                  Rajwant S. Virk, 46, of Herndon, Virginia, was arrested Tuesday morning at his home in Herndon. He appeared that same day before a Magistrate Judge in Alexandria, Virginia. He was released on bond and is expected to appear there again today at 2:00 p.m. for further proceedings.

                  Rachhpal Singh, 32, of Hayward, California, was arrested Tuesday morning at his home Hayward. He appeared yesterday before a Magistrate Judge in San Francisco, where he was released on bond and ordered to appear in U.S. District Court in Sacramento on Tuesday, May 6, 2003, at 2:00 p.m.

                  Davinder Singh Bhullar, 44, remains at large and is believed to be in India. He is currently a fugitive in an unrelated criminal case also pending in U.S. District Court in Sacramento.

                  In addition to the conspiracy charged against all defendants, defendants Johnson, Lee and Vinesh and Minesh Prasad are each charged with ten counts of wire fraud, one count of mail fraud, and one count of bribery. Defendants Vinesh and Minesh Prasad, Narinderjit Singh Bhullar and his brother Davinder Singh Bhullar are charged with one count of visa fraud, and Narinderjit and Davinder Singh Bhullar are each charged with one count of wire fraud. Vinesh Prasad is further charged with one count of encouraging illegal entry of aliens for financial gain, and with two counts of money laundering. Finally, Narinderjit Singh Bhullar is charged with one count of money laundering.

                  Each of the charges in the indictment is a felony. The maximum sentence for the conspiracy charge, and for each wire fraud, mail fraud, and money laundering charge is five years in prison. The visa fraud and encouraging entry by aliens charges each has a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison, and the bribery charge has a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison. Each count in the indictment also carries a penalty of up to a three-year period of supervised release, and a $250,000 fine. The indictment also seeks forfeiture of various properties, bank accounts, and over $175,000 in cash seized during searches on Tuesday.

                  The case is being prosecuted in U.S. District Court in Sacramento by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Benjamin B. Wagner and S. Robert Tice-Raskin of the U.S. Attorney's Office, and Noah D. Bookbinder of the Public Integrity Section, headed by Noel L. Hillman, Chief. The case is the product of an extensive investigation conducted by the Diplomatic Security Service and the Joint Terrorism Task Force for the Eastern District of California, a task force headquartered at the FBI offices in Sacramento. Sri Lankan law enforcement authorities also provided assistance in the investigation. The U.S. Attorney thanked the U.S. Ambassador in Sri Lanka, E. Ashley Wills, for his assistance.

                  The United States Attorney's Office noted that the complaint and indictment are only accusations, and that the defendants are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

                  ###

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    how can i find someone who has a greencard? only know name and state?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Contact the BCIS.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Two Department Of State Employees Charged With Visa Fraud
                        __________________________________________________

                        The Department of Justice announced last week that a federal grand jury in Sacramento has returned an 18-count indictment charging nine persons, including two former employees of the State Department, in connection with a scheme to sell entry visas into the United States. Eight of the nine defendants were arrested at locations in three states. The State Department employees charged are Long N. Lee, 51, and Acey R. Johnson, 32, and the two are married.

                        According to the 130-page complaint, the visa scheme involved the payment of hundreds of thousands of dollars to the State Department employees in exchange for the issuing of visas to various foreign nationals, primarily from Vietnam and India.

                        All nine defendants are charged with conspiring to defraud the United States and to bribe public officials and to commit visa fraud.

                        In addition to conspiracy, Johnson and Lee are also charged with ten counts of wire fraud, one count of mail fraud, and one count of bribery. Vinesh Prasad, 33, is also charged with one count of visa fraud, one count of wire fraud, one count of encouraging illegal entry of aliens for financial gain, and two counts of money laundering. The other defendants are Minesh Prasad, 28; Phuong-Hien Lam Trinh, 35; Rajwant S. Virk, 46; Davinder Singh Bhullar, 44; and Rachhpal Singh, 32.

                        Bhullar remains at large and is believed to be in India. He is currently a fugitive in an unrelated criminal case also pending in U.S. District Court in Sacramento.

                        Each of the charges in the indictment is considered a felony. The maximum sentence for the conspiracy charge, and for each wire fraud, mail fraud and money laundering charge is five years in prison, and each count also carries a penalty of up to three years of supervised release and a $250,000 fine.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          WASHINGTON, D.C. - Assistant Attorney General Michael Chertoff of the Criminal Division and United States Attorney Johnny Sutton announced today that Rustem Muho, also known as Galli Franco, pleaded guilty in federal District Court in Del Rio, Texas, to a charge of conspiracy to smuggle aliens into the United States.

                          Rustem Muho was named in a one count indictment returned on February 19, 2003. The defendant was arrested by agents of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Houston on January 28, 2003. The indictment charged Muho with one count of conspiracy to bring or attempt to bring aliens into the United States.

                          According to the indictment, between October, 2002, and January, 2003, the defendant conspired with other persons to bring Albanian nationals into the United States, using routes from Albania through Europe, Central America and Mexico. The defendant arranged for airline and land passage and paid for food and housing during the trip. Part of the journey involved hiding the smuggled aliens in the bathroom of a bus traveling from San Salvador, El Salvador, to Guatemala City, Guatemala. The defendant charged up to $12,000 for illegal passage into the United States for trips that took as long as three months.

                          The maximum sentence for conspiracy is ten years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000. Sentencing will be on Aug.14, 2003 before Judge Alia Moses Ludlam.

                          The indictment and plea are the result of on-going investigation into the smuggling of illegal aliens into the United States by the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The case was prosecuted by trial attorney Anne Marie Farrar, from the Domestic Security Section of the U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, and Assistant United States Attorney Robert Cadena.



                          http://www.ilw.com/lawyers/immigdail...smuggling.shtm

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
                            FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 2003
                            WWW.USDOJ.GOV
                            CRM
                            (202) 514-2008
                            TDD (202) 514-1888




                            DEFENDANT PLEADS GUILTY IN CASE INVOLVING SCHEME TO SELL VISAS



                            WASHINGTON, D.C. - Assistant Attorney General Michael Chertoff of the Criminal Division and U.S. Attorney McGregor W. Scott of the Eastern District of California announced today that Rajwant S. Virk has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Sacramento, Calif., to one count of conspiring to defraud the United States, bribe State Department officials and commit visa fraud.

                            Virk, 46, of Herndon, Virginia, is one of nine defendants charged as part of an ongoing visa fraud investigation. Virk has agreed to cooperate with the government's continuing investigation. He faces a maximum penalty of five years in prison at sentencing, scheduled for Aug. 22, 2003.

                            Seven other defendants charged in a May 1, 2003 indictment also appeared today before U.S. District Judge Garland E. Burrell. Judge Burrell also heard argument on a motion relating to the bail status of defendants Vinesh Prasad, 33, and Minesh Pradad, 28, both of Sacramento. Defendants Acey R. Johnson, 32, who until recently was a Consular Associate employed in the consular section of the U.S. Embassy in Sri Lanka, and his spouse Long N. Lee, a State Department Foreign Service Officer and career State Department employee, are also in federal custody. Defendants Narinderjit Singh Bhullar, 40, of Sacramento, Phuong-Hien Lam Trinh, 35, of Torrance, Calif., and Rachhpal Singh, 32, of Hayward, Calif., were previously released on bail.

                            The ninth defendant charged in the case is a fugitive.

                            According to a criminal complaint unsealed April 29, 2003, the defendants were allegedly involved in a scheme in which Johnson and Lee took hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes between 2000 and 2003 in exchange for the issuance of visas to various foreign nationals, primarily from Vietnam and India. In his plea today, Virk admitted that he started making payments to Johnson and Lee in 1999 to obtain visas for others wishing to enter the United States. He also admitted that in 2002 and 2003, he coordinated the travel of aliens to Sri Lanka directly with defendant Long Lee, where the aliens were given visas at the U.S. Embassy to enter the United States. Virk also admitted that, after arranging for the issuance of the visas, Lee instructed Virk to purchase cashiers checks in amounts under $10,000, payable to Lee and Johnson, to their relatives, and to accounts which they controlled. Virk also admitted that he delivered cash to family members of Lee.

                            In addition to a conspiracy charge against all defendants, several of the defendants are charged with wire fraud, bribery, visa fraud and other felony offenses. The case is being prosecuted in U.S. District Court in Sacramento by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Benjamin B. Wagner and S. Robert Tice-Raskin of the U.S. Attorney's Office, and Noah D. Bookbinder of the Public Integrity Section, headed by Section Chief Noel L. Hillman. The case is the product of an extensive investigation conducted by the Diplomatic Security Service of the U.S. Department of State, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the California Anti-Terrorism Information Center (CATIC) and several other state and federal agencies associated with the Joint Terrorism Task Force for the Eastern District of California, including the California Bureau of Investigation, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and the Bureau of Immigration Control and Enforcement of the Department of Homeland Security. Sri Lankan law enforcement authorities also provided assistance in the investigation.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              My alien friend says these types of things were regularly done in his home country

                              Comment

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