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  • dream act

    hi i was 8 year old when i came to U.S.A i came here with my parents. i have been in school since 1993 i just finished my high school. my dad told me about a law called dream act can it help me get my green card or any other legal status ? and i am new york queens area in thank you for your help

  • #2
    hi i was 8 year old when i came to U.S.A i came here with my parents. i have been in school since 1993 i just finished my high school. my dad told me about a law called dream act can it help me get my green card or any other legal status ? and i am new york queens area in thank you for your help

    Comment


    • #3
      kingofnyc17,

      Hey what's up? Dream Act passed Senate last year but it didn't make further progress before the year ended.

      The Student Adjustment Act, which is very similar to Dream Act, was introduced this month, and the Dream Act is almost planning on be re-introduced very soon.

      Since you're in New York, you're allowed to pay in-state tuition, similar to Cali, Texas, and Utah.

      Hopefully both of the acts will go through congress during the summer, keep your fingers crossed.

      Comment


      • #4
        Letter: Immigrants deserve U.S. benefits


        posted: April 24, 2003


        In the editorial, "Undocumented aliens not entitled to in-state tuition," (CT, April 23), the author's point is well argued.
        However, Americans should wonder why Mexico is actively pushing for the acceptance of Mexican identification cards in many states, an amnesty for millions of illegal Mexicans and more guest-worker visas.

        Why have Mexico and numerous Mexican-American leaders vigorously lobbied for benefits for millions of illegal Mexican immigrants, such as in-state tuition and driver's licenses for illegal aliens?

        Last June, a Zogby poll showed that 58 percent of Mexicans in Mexico believe the U.S. Southwest rightfully belongs to them, and 57 percent of Mexicans do not believe they need U.S. permission to enter this country.

        "The Mexican nation extends beyond its territories enclosed by its borders, and Mexican migrants are a very important part of it," said Ernesto Zedillo, former president of Mexico, at the National Council of La Raza in Chicago in 1997.

        In the last decade, the Hispanic population exploded all over the U.S. Even in North Carolina it increased by more than 600 percent.

        "As goes the Latino population, will go the state of California; and as goes the state of California, will go the United States of America," said former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry Cisneros to a Hispanic audience in 1995.

        "My friends, the stakes are big," Cisneros said. "This is a fight worth making."

        But is Mexico using immigration to control American policies and, eventually, control the entire United States? While Mexican immigrants seem to possess no political agenda, we should remember "” children born in the United States, even to illegal immigrants and guest workers, are U.S. citizens and can vote when they turn 18.



        by Yeh Ling-Ling
        Executive Director, Diversity Alliance for a Sustainable America

        Comment


        • #5
          House vote likely kills in-state tuition for illegals
          By Peggy Lowe, Rocky Mountain News
          April 24, 2003

          House Republicans effectively killed a bill Wednesday that would have allowed illegal immigrants to attend state colleges at resident tuition rates.

          The GOP majority, on a 35-30 vote, sent House Bill 1178 to the State Veterans & Military Affairs Committee, a graveyard for many bills.

          "This was gutless," said an angry Rep. Jack Pommer, D-Boulder. "They purposefully dodged this vote."

          Republicans argued that illegal immigrants shouldn't have the same benefits as U.S. citizens. Granting such services makes federal laws irrelevant, said Rep. Shawn Mitchell, R-Broomfield.

          "The state should not be in the business of abrogating federal immigration law," Mitchell said.

          HB 1178 would have allowed illegal immigrants who have spent three consecutive years in a Colorado high school to get resident rates for the first year in a state college - but only if they applied for U.S. residency during that time.

          That would have helped Jesus Apodaca, an 18-year-old Aurora honor student and illegal immigrant who started a firestorm last summer when he said he was unable to attend college because he could not afford the out-of-state tuition rates the state's universities charge illegal immigrants.

          HB 1178 was sponsored by Rep. Val Vigil, D-Thornton, who said the illegal-immigrant parents of many of these children don't get residency status for them. The year of lower-priced tuition would allow Colorado students to become part of a well-educated work force, he said.

          But Rep. Mike May, R-Parker, said the state's tight budget shouldn't be spent on illegal immigrants' college tuition.

          "This is the wrong time and the wrong message," May said.

          Comment

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