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Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: BICE Revokes Bonds, Detains after Hearings

  1. #1
    The Connecticut Chapter of the AILA reported on August 14, 2003 that the Hartford, Connecticut Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (BICE) has begun revoking bonds of foreign nationals after they lose their removal cases before the immigration court. After the merits hearing in removal proceedings in immigration court, those individuals who lose their cases, are immediately taken into detention by BICE, and held until they can be physically removed from the U.S.

    Individuals who are put into removal (formerly, deportation) proceedings are, in some instances, allowed to post bonds rather than be detained in BICE custody pending their removal hearings. These bonds generally continue to their departures, in the event that they did not win their cases in immigration court. Merits hearings are held when the foreign nationals have been put into removal proceedings, but claim eligibility for immigration benefits on some legal basis. The court will accept certain applications for immigration relief, consider supporting documentary evidence, and hear witness testimony.

    Though BICE headquarters officials have not released a formal statement regarding this "pilot program," DHS employees in Hartford and other parts of the U.S. have indicated their plan to extend this practice nation-wide. It is not clear whether individuals who are in proceedings, but were never detained (therefore, did not require a bond), will be held following unsuccessful merits hearings. Presumably, the reason for this change in policy is that, historically, many people who were ordered removed (or deported), would not actually depart the U.S. at the required time. They would simply disappear to evade removal from the U.S. Prior to September 11, 2001, there were not adequate resources to track and pursue these people if they were not criminals or otherwise regarded as dangerous. The new measure would eliminate the problem and forcibly remove these people soon after their immigration court hearings. Of course, it also prevents them from wrapping up legitimate financial and business matters before being forcibly returned to their respective home countries.

    Those who are subject to a removal proceeding should obtain qualified and experienced immigration assistance. The attorney should be local to the area, as regular in-person court appearances generally are required for all removal hearings. Of course, ideally, no one should put him/herself into the position of facing a removal proceeding.

  2. #2
    The Connecticut Chapter of the AILA reported on August 14, 2003 that the Hartford, Connecticut Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (BICE) has begun revoking bonds of foreign nationals after they lose their removal cases before the immigration court. After the merits hearing in removal proceedings in immigration court, those individuals who lose their cases, are immediately taken into detention by BICE, and held until they can be physically removed from the U.S.

    Individuals who are put into removal (formerly, deportation) proceedings are, in some instances, allowed to post bonds rather than be detained in BICE custody pending their removal hearings. These bonds generally continue to their departures, in the event that they did not win their cases in immigration court. Merits hearings are held when the foreign nationals have been put into removal proceedings, but claim eligibility for immigration benefits on some legal basis. The court will accept certain applications for immigration relief, consider supporting documentary evidence, and hear witness testimony.

    Though BICE headquarters officials have not released a formal statement regarding this "pilot program," DHS employees in Hartford and other parts of the U.S. have indicated their plan to extend this practice nation-wide. It is not clear whether individuals who are in proceedings, but were never detained (therefore, did not require a bond), will be held following unsuccessful merits hearings. Presumably, the reason for this change in policy is that, historically, many people who were ordered removed (or deported), would not actually depart the U.S. at the required time. They would simply disappear to evade removal from the U.S. Prior to September 11, 2001, there were not adequate resources to track and pursue these people if they were not criminals or otherwise regarded as dangerous. The new measure would eliminate the problem and forcibly remove these people soon after their immigration court hearings. Of course, it also prevents them from wrapping up legitimate financial and business matters before being forcibly returned to their respective home countries.

    Those who are subject to a removal proceeding should obtain qualified and experienced immigration assistance. The attorney should be local to the area, as regular in-person court appearances generally are required for all removal hearings. Of course, ideally, no one should put him/herself into the position of facing a removal proceeding.

  3. #3
    Guest
    what the hell is this lady talking about,you are either here legally as a guest worker or not,whebn your time runs out,go back to your country,your people,and apply again. Why all the bull**** talk

  4. #4
    Do you think that EVERYBODY is here illegally??

  5. #5
    Guest
    Amen. This is what I would like to see, no bonds, esp. for those who pose even minimal flight risk. I would like to be deputized for the seizure, holding without bail, and escort to the tarmac of one woman, whose description in mere criminal parlance is a feat not easily undertaken. That is the rip-off, conspiratorial woman I married. She lied about everything, in her recent and distant past. Her family lied. A female she ran off with, conspired. That girl's mother was ex-INS, and she helped blow the cover off an inter-state ring, involved in many things: fraud schemes, elder abuse rip-off,
    cult activity (something Brazillian, Venezuelan), kidnapping schemes have begun to emerge. These people are socio-paths. They flaunt themselves. I say hold 'em, no-bond 'em, hear 'em, boot 'em.

  6. #6
    Close Monitoring of those Subject to Removal
    ____________________________________________

    The ICE structure includes the Office of Detention and Removal, which is responsible for immigration enforcement and removal issues. The Hartford Project is an experimental project involving detaining foreign nationals who lose their removal cases in Immigration Court. As an alternative to detention, ICE is considering different methods of tracking foreign nationals, including electronic monitoring, in those cases where detention is not mandatory.

    ICE is also working on accounting for all foreign nationals who have received a final order of removal / deportation. Some people with final orders, particularly those not considered to be dangerous, have lingered in the U.S. for many years. This is the problem that ICE is attempting to address through the Hartford Project and other efforts.

    http://www.murthy.com/ukice.html

  7. #7

    Re: BICE Revokes Bonds, Detains after Hearings

    If, after paying a bond and being released, you do not appear for future court hearings, the bond will be revoked and the U.S. government will keep the money. Plain and simple!

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