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Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Return Americans

  1. #1
    Guest
    I have seen in this forum, that INS inspectors are returning many Europeans and Canadians, on many different grounds.
    Relationships between countries are based on reciprocity.
    It Would be interesting to see what would be the reactions of Americans, if foreign governments start getting fed up of the USA sending their citizens back, and apply reciprocity to Americans at their POE's, and start refussing admission to Americans (Here I don't mean deportations which are a different matter, I mean people refused admission).
    Also regarding marriage, what would be the reaction of Americans, if foreign gvmnts start taking forever to admit American spouses of their citizens (in most countries this is a simple process).
    So if you are having this kind of problem, it may be a godd idea to write to your countrie's Foreign Ministry. No common citizen will make INS change, but maybe a formal protest from the G-7 countries will. Good luck to you all.

  2. #2
    Guest
    I have seen in this forum, that INS inspectors are returning many Europeans and Canadians, on many different grounds.
    Relationships between countries are based on reciprocity.
    It Would be interesting to see what would be the reactions of Americans, if foreign governments start getting fed up of the USA sending their citizens back, and apply reciprocity to Americans at their POE's, and start refussing admission to Americans (Here I don't mean deportations which are a different matter, I mean people refused admission).
    Also regarding marriage, what would be the reaction of Americans, if foreign gvmnts start taking forever to admit American spouses of their citizens (in most countries this is a simple process).
    So if you are having this kind of problem, it may be a godd idea to write to your countrie's Foreign Ministry. No common citizen will make INS change, but maybe a formal protest from the G-7 countries will. Good luck to you all.

  3. #3
    Guest
    Just out of curiosity, what makes you think it is any easier or quicker in other countries? Many European countries in fact have much stricter immigration rules than the US does. Did you know in many European countries, immigrants in several visa categories have to report to immigratio in that country once every 12 months.

    Also, no other country in the world has nearly as many people trying to enter the country as the US does. Most Americans that travel (as far as I know) do not intend to stay illegally, most of them very much intend to go back home. This is not true for a lot of people that come to the US, especially from certain countries.

  4. #4
    Guest
    I know, it is hard in Europe, that is why I was specific about Marriage cases. I have friends who have married Spaniards, Italians, French, Norwegians and Swedes, the process in all of these cases has been very straightforward, i.e., they enter the country, and fix your papers while you are there. No restrictions in coming in and going out whenever you please.
    It is true that MANY people want to enter the US to live there, but it is not exclusive to the USA. Because of its size, total population and size of the economy, it is the major recepient of people wanting to live there, but, the EU as a whole, probably has a similar number of people wanting to go there, specially from Asia and Africa. The USA on the other hand is a major recepient of immigrants specially from Latin America + Far East.
    And it is not limited to USA / Canada /Europe, immigration (legal an ilegal), also happens in the following regions:
    South East Asia, and India region to: Taiwan, Korea, Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong.
    Angola, Zimbabwe and sorrounding countries to South Africa.
    And you may be surprised by some lesser known cases as:
    Nicaragua to Costa Rica
    Honduras + Nicaragua to El Salvador
    Colombia to Venezuela, Costa Rica and Panama
    Haiti to Dominican Republic.
    And there are probably MANY more (hey, even Iraq to Libya!!)

    So my friend, yes the US is the major recepient of immigrants, but it is a world wide phenomenon.

  5. #5
    Guest
    USA is not the only country turning people away. Countries like Germany and Finland (I believe) have been critizised for turning a lot of people away at the border. Different countries have different immigration issues, and their laws will reflect those issues.

    But, since marriage based immigration was the topic of discussion... way back when, it used to be very easy for people that married a US citizen to just cross the border, and be issued a green card right on the spot. However, with the large volume of people trying to come to the US, it turned out to be a big problem with a lot of people only getting married to get a green card, and then they would divorce right away. A country must be able to protect itself from these types of things, and adjust their immigration laws accordingly. In most countries, perhaps this is not a problem, so there's no need to have long and complicated immigration procedures.

    I am currently in the process of adjusting my status to PR based on marriage, so I know very well how frustrating the process is... don't get me started

    However, the US is not, and should not be obligated to adjust the immigration laws to please governments and citizens of other countries.

  6. #6
    Guest
    Hi Marksap

    Please don't get me wrong, every country has the right to enact whatever law it desires. I found this forum because a friend told me that I wanted to read about complicated laws, I should take a look at it.
    When I wrote, I just wanted to point the following:
    a) You are right in stating that a lot of people marry just to get green cards (the situation is similar in most 1st. world countries), so the screening is more than justified, what is not, is the restriction of movement during such a long screening process (long is a key word here).
    My wife is not from where I live, so she immigrated here. Did she have to go trough tight screening, Yes she did. Was her freedom of movement hindered because she was my wife, no way, it was actually facilitated becase she was married to a local resident.
    So my question was: What would be the reaction of Americans, if by marrying a foreigner their rights would be as restricted in their spouses country, as they become to a foreigner (during the processing period) in the US when he/she marries an American?

    b) From what I read in this forum, many Canadians/Europeans (from VWP countries), are being refused entry into the US. for a variety of reasons (being married to an American, Single Overstays {which is VERY different from multipleoverstays}, visiting the USA too often, INS mistakes in record keeping). Once again, you are right when you indicate that most Americans go back to the USA, but so do most Canadians and Europeans.
    So, my second question was: What would be the reaction of Americans, if they start being refused entry into Europe/Canada because they are married to a Canadian/European, because they overstayed once some years ago (many have), because they travel two often to Canada/Europe, or because of errors in the records of the Canadian/European entry/exit records?

    I'm sure they would not like it!

    I must point out, I like the US, I travel there for short business visits, and do quite a bit of business with US companies, so please don't interpret this posting as coming from somebody who does not like that country, but I think some "reciprocity" from Canada/Europe in the above mentioned points, would even be healthy.

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