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Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: The Pope is senile.

  1. #1
    Guest
    Pope John Paul II led worshippers in celebrating Christmas, invoking Jesus as a symbol of peace as Vatican officials increasingly voice their opposition to a war in Iraq.


    Speaking during a midnight Mass ushering in the holiday, the pope said Jesus' birth "is a sign of hope for the whole human family; a sign of peace for those suffering from conflicts of every kind; a sign of freedom for the poor and oppressed; a sign of mercy for those caught up in the vicious circle of sin."


    Hours earlier, the Vatican newspaper, L'Osservatore Romano, headlined its Christmas editions: "Humanity can win the 'battle' of peace."


    "While the clouds of war lengthen, the minds and hearts of men in all continents are drawn to Christmas," the newspaper wrote in a front-page article.


    It was the latest in a chorus of Vatican voices coming out against a war in Iraq, which the United States says is hoarding weapons of mass destruction.


    In recent days, top Vatican officials have said a "preventive" war against Iraq had no legal justification and could spark an anti-Christian campaign in the Muslim world.


    On Christmas Eve, a life-sized Nativity scene was unveiled in St. Peter's Square depicting the birth of Jesus in a Bethlehem manger.


    Bagpipes played and children's choirs sang on the warm winter's night as visitors marveled at the creche and *****ling Croatian Christmas tree that stood next to the piazza's obelisk.


    After nightfall, John Paul went to his studio window above the piazza and lit a candle, a silent vigil for peace that has been a hallmark of his 24-year papacy.


    The pope later emerged for the lengthy midnight Mass, looking a bit tired but resplendent in gold-trimmed white vestments. The 82-year-old pope suffers from the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and has trouble walking.


    As hymns rang out in the marble basilica, 12 children from nine countries and dressed in traditional costumes presented wreaths on the church altar as John Paul looked on smiling.


    Vatican officials have been increasingly speaking out against the prospect of war, drawing a sharp difference between a strike against Iraq and what Church officials had said was a "just war" against terrorism following the Sept. 11 attacks.


    Archbishop Renato Martino, the prefect of the Council for Justice and Peace and the Vatican's former U.N. envoy, told reporters last week that a preventive war was a "war of aggression" and therefore not a "just war."


    And Monday, the Vatican's foreign minister, Archbishop Jean-Louis Tauran, warned of the consequences a war on Iraq could ignite in the Islamic world.


    "A type of anti-Christian, anti-Western crusade could be incited because some ignorant masses mix everything together," the Rome daily La Repubblica quoted Tauran as saying.


    The pope himself has recently decried all the conflicts engulfing the world, mentioning the "forgotten" wars but also the one between Israel and the Palestinians and its effects on the Holy Land.


    This year, Palestinians were celebrating a somber Christmas in Bethlehem, the traditional birthplace of Jesus, following renewed occupation of the biblical city by Israeli troops.

  2. #2
    Guest
    Pope John Paul II led worshippers in celebrating Christmas, invoking Jesus as a symbol of peace as Vatican officials increasingly voice their opposition to a war in Iraq.


    Speaking during a midnight Mass ushering in the holiday, the pope said Jesus' birth "is a sign of hope for the whole human family; a sign of peace for those suffering from conflicts of every kind; a sign of freedom for the poor and oppressed; a sign of mercy for those caught up in the vicious circle of sin."


    Hours earlier, the Vatican newspaper, L'Osservatore Romano, headlined its Christmas editions: "Humanity can win the 'battle' of peace."


    "While the clouds of war lengthen, the minds and hearts of men in all continents are drawn to Christmas," the newspaper wrote in a front-page article.


    It was the latest in a chorus of Vatican voices coming out against a war in Iraq, which the United States says is hoarding weapons of mass destruction.


    In recent days, top Vatican officials have said a "preventive" war against Iraq had no legal justification and could spark an anti-Christian campaign in the Muslim world.


    On Christmas Eve, a life-sized Nativity scene was unveiled in St. Peter's Square depicting the birth of Jesus in a Bethlehem manger.


    Bagpipes played and children's choirs sang on the warm winter's night as visitors marveled at the creche and *****ling Croatian Christmas tree that stood next to the piazza's obelisk.


    After nightfall, John Paul went to his studio window above the piazza and lit a candle, a silent vigil for peace that has been a hallmark of his 24-year papacy.


    The pope later emerged for the lengthy midnight Mass, looking a bit tired but resplendent in gold-trimmed white vestments. The 82-year-old pope suffers from the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and has trouble walking.


    As hymns rang out in the marble basilica, 12 children from nine countries and dressed in traditional costumes presented wreaths on the church altar as John Paul looked on smiling.


    Vatican officials have been increasingly speaking out against the prospect of war, drawing a sharp difference between a strike against Iraq and what Church officials had said was a "just war" against terrorism following the Sept. 11 attacks.


    Archbishop Renato Martino, the prefect of the Council for Justice and Peace and the Vatican's former U.N. envoy, told reporters last week that a preventive war was a "war of aggression" and therefore not a "just war."


    And Monday, the Vatican's foreign minister, Archbishop Jean-Louis Tauran, warned of the consequences a war on Iraq could ignite in the Islamic world.


    "A type of anti-Christian, anti-Western crusade could be incited because some ignorant masses mix everything together," the Rome daily La Repubblica quoted Tauran as saying.


    The pope himself has recently decried all the conflicts engulfing the world, mentioning the "forgotten" wars but also the one between Israel and the Palestinians and its effects on the Holy Land.


    This year, Palestinians were celebrating a somber Christmas in Bethlehem, the traditional birthplace of Jesus, following renewed occupation of the biblical city by Israeli troops.

  3. #3
    Guest
    why he doh talk about them buller-men "priests" who only want to rub young boys stones?

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