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Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: another broken family

  1. #1
    Guest
    http://www.newsday.com/news/yahoo/ny...ol%2Dheadlines
    ---------------------------
    Hoping for a Miracle
    Lindenhurst wife battles INS to set husband free

    By Bart Jones
    STAFF WRITER

    October 23, 2002
    The ordeal started with eight FBI and INS agents
    banging at 5 a.m. on the door of Christine and Naim Shahab, teenage sweethearts who grew up together in Lindenhurst, graduated from the district high school and got married in the local Catholic church.

    Christine said the agents asked Naim to come with
    them, but not to worry, it was probably just a mistake.

    "Please don't take my daughter," she pleaded, afraid that then 2-year-old Savannah also would be seized.

    Nearly eight months later, Naim is still sitting in a jail in Newton, N.J., and the Immigration and Naturalization Service wants to deport him to battle-scarred Afghanistan, the nation he and his parents left two decades ago when he was 8 because, they say, political violence threatened their lives.

    "All I want is to be free and be with my family" on Long Island, the 1993 Lindenhurst High School graduate said yesterday in a telephone interview from the Sussex County Jail.

    His wife is so desperate, she has sold the couple's home and is poised to follow her husband to Afghanistan, though she says she can't bear to take her daughter to what was the land of the Taliban and may have to leave her behind, for now.

    "I don't want to give up but I just feel like it's never going to end," Christine, 24, said. "I'm ready to give in" and stop appealing the case.

    Naim, 27, runs his own car audio business in Lindenhurst, pays taxes, is married
    to a U.S. citizen and is the father of a U.S. citizen. But INS officials say that is
    not enough to allow him to stay in America. They say his parents lost a long-running political asylum case and ignored a deportation order issued a decade ago, when he was 17, and now the entire family must face the consequences.

    "If the family didn't leave when they were ordered to leave ... they in effect became fugitives," an INS official said yesterday. "There is a misconception that many people have that marriage to a U.S. citizen heals all legal wounds. That is not correct."

    The official, who asked not to be named, added that "any representation which would indicate that these folks are somehow or other being railroaded, I think is improper."

    But Christine said Naim's parents, who are also being held in jails in New Jersey and may be deported, didn't go back to Afghanistan because they probably would have been killed. Two of his relatives were murdered for political reasons in the 1970s, she said.

    She and Naim applied for permanent U.S. residency for him right after they were married in 1997, and were assured by INS officials that he would get his green card shortly, she said. Instead, their case has become lost in a maze of bureaucracy.

    "This is a disgraceful action by the U.S. government," said the couple's Manhattan-based attorney, Jules Coven, a past president of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. "Basically, the government has destroyed their
    life."

    He scoffed at INS assertions that Naim was a "fugitive," saying Naim regularly showed up at Manhattan INS offices to apply for renewal of a work authorization and that his paperwork was routinely approved.

    In fact, Naim was at the INS offices applying for the latest renewal a month before
    agents went to their home March 7, Christine said.

    The couple won a temporary stay of deportation Sept. 6 from a federal judge in Manhattan, but he has not ruled on their petition to force the INS to decide on Naim's pending green card application and give him legal status. Another possibility is for Naim to go to Afghanistan and seek a visa to return to the United States as the spouse of a U.S. citizen, though there is no telling, officials said, how long that might take or if it would be approved.

    Meanwhile, the couple's options are running out.
    Christine can visit her husband only once a week at the Sussex County Jail, on Sundays, for about a half-hour as permitted by jail rules. She leaves home at 5:30 a.m. so she can get back in time to open the couple's business, Audio Garage, which she now runs alone.

    Little Savannah doesn't understand what is happening to her father. She stares at photographs in the couple's wedding album, and says, "I love you, Daddy." Naim missed his daughter's third birthday party on Sept. 28, but she too visits him in jail on Sundays.

    The prospect of the family being separated for years is tearing apart Christine's parents, who adore Naim. "My family is breaking apart in front of my eyes and there's nothing I can do about it," said Christine's father, Thomas Ormsby, 50, a
    retired telephone company installation foreman.

    The INS official said he sympathized with the family's plight, but that the agency
    is under a mandate to carry out U.S. immigration laws and Naim's family broke the law.

    Christine said she is pleading for mercy: "We're hoping for a miracle."

    Copyright 2002, Newsday, Inc.

  2. #2
    Guest
    http://www.newsday.com/news/yahoo/ny...ol%2Dheadlines
    ---------------------------
    Hoping for a Miracle
    Lindenhurst wife battles INS to set husband free

    By Bart Jones
    STAFF WRITER

    October 23, 2002
    The ordeal started with eight FBI and INS agents
    banging at 5 a.m. on the door of Christine and Naim Shahab, teenage sweethearts who grew up together in Lindenhurst, graduated from the district high school and got married in the local Catholic church.

    Christine said the agents asked Naim to come with
    them, but not to worry, it was probably just a mistake.

    "Please don't take my daughter," she pleaded, afraid that then 2-year-old Savannah also would be seized.

    Nearly eight months later, Naim is still sitting in a jail in Newton, N.J., and the Immigration and Naturalization Service wants to deport him to battle-scarred Afghanistan, the nation he and his parents left two decades ago when he was 8 because, they say, political violence threatened their lives.

    "All I want is to be free and be with my family" on Long Island, the 1993 Lindenhurst High School graduate said yesterday in a telephone interview from the Sussex County Jail.

    His wife is so desperate, she has sold the couple's home and is poised to follow her husband to Afghanistan, though she says she can't bear to take her daughter to what was the land of the Taliban and may have to leave her behind, for now.

    "I don't want to give up but I just feel like it's never going to end," Christine, 24, said. "I'm ready to give in" and stop appealing the case.

    Naim, 27, runs his own car audio business in Lindenhurst, pays taxes, is married
    to a U.S. citizen and is the father of a U.S. citizen. But INS officials say that is
    not enough to allow him to stay in America. They say his parents lost a long-running political asylum case and ignored a deportation order issued a decade ago, when he was 17, and now the entire family must face the consequences.

    "If the family didn't leave when they were ordered to leave ... they in effect became fugitives," an INS official said yesterday. "There is a misconception that many people have that marriage to a U.S. citizen heals all legal wounds. That is not correct."

    The official, who asked not to be named, added that "any representation which would indicate that these folks are somehow or other being railroaded, I think is improper."

    But Christine said Naim's parents, who are also being held in jails in New Jersey and may be deported, didn't go back to Afghanistan because they probably would have been killed. Two of his relatives were murdered for political reasons in the 1970s, she said.

    She and Naim applied for permanent U.S. residency for him right after they were married in 1997, and were assured by INS officials that he would get his green card shortly, she said. Instead, their case has become lost in a maze of bureaucracy.

    "This is a disgraceful action by the U.S. government," said the couple's Manhattan-based attorney, Jules Coven, a past president of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. "Basically, the government has destroyed their
    life."

    He scoffed at INS assertions that Naim was a "fugitive," saying Naim regularly showed up at Manhattan INS offices to apply for renewal of a work authorization and that his paperwork was routinely approved.

    In fact, Naim was at the INS offices applying for the latest renewal a month before
    agents went to their home March 7, Christine said.

    The couple won a temporary stay of deportation Sept. 6 from a federal judge in Manhattan, but he has not ruled on their petition to force the INS to decide on Naim's pending green card application and give him legal status. Another possibility is for Naim to go to Afghanistan and seek a visa to return to the United States as the spouse of a U.S. citizen, though there is no telling, officials said, how long that might take or if it would be approved.

    Meanwhile, the couple's options are running out.
    Christine can visit her husband only once a week at the Sussex County Jail, on Sundays, for about a half-hour as permitted by jail rules. She leaves home at 5:30 a.m. so she can get back in time to open the couple's business, Audio Garage, which she now runs alone.

    Little Savannah doesn't understand what is happening to her father. She stares at photographs in the couple's wedding album, and says, "I love you, Daddy." Naim missed his daughter's third birthday party on Sept. 28, but she too visits him in jail on Sundays.

    The prospect of the family being separated for years is tearing apart Christine's parents, who adore Naim. "My family is breaking apart in front of my eyes and there's nothing I can do about it," said Christine's father, Thomas Ormsby, 50, a
    retired telephone company installation foreman.

    The INS official said he sympathized with the family's plight, but that the agency
    is under a mandate to carry out U.S. immigration laws and Naim's family broke the law.

    Christine said she is pleading for mercy: "We're hoping for a miracle."

    Copyright 2002, Newsday, Inc.

  3. #3
    Guest
    I hope you can read this post. I truly remember that it's always in the "discretion" of the IO the miracle we can call. How it is being practiced? with enforcing what is written and ordered as a law? with at least including humanitarian consideration?

    Based on what I have read, the family owned a business and have proven somehow that they are valuable people. I will be very happy to see a consideration for this kind of case, rather than LPRs commiting crimes and can get a chance for pardon. The husband wants to stay with his family. I'm sure if he can be granted a green card with a big title as "lifetime conditional" to be renewed every month, he'll be very glad to accept it and call it miracle. If he commits another INS violation, I'll vote for him to go.

    "There is a misconception that many people have that marriage to a U.S. citizen heals all legal wounds. That is not correct."
    --To everyone adjusting status through marriage:
    Do this in good faith, let us protect other human being also. I will not be very happy in the future to tell my children that, "one criteria of good marriage is your fiance's legal status here".

    let's ask our families who can vote to continue supporting the fair immigration law that preserves "family unity".

    God bless.

  4. #4
    Guest
    Although this case is heart breaking, what needs to be pointed out is that this individual had been in this country for YEARS as an illegal alien after his family ignored a deportation order.

    So I ask, is it fair to those of us who do not break immigration law to have individuals who do get the benefits that we are seeking? I don't think so. What about all of us who are seperated from our families for years as we 'wade through the system' according to the rules? Is it fair?

    That being said, now that this case is getting all the exposure that it is, a polititian will pick up on it and influce the INS' decision. You watch, this individual will get his case reversed for POLITICAL reasons, not legitimate reasons.

  5. #5
    Guest
    Your allegations are just the same as this:" Illegal immigrants takes US Citizens their jobs!!!".... Please be real... these people is suffering as much as anyone of us or maybe more... if we are expecting INS or US Country to receive us as part of them... why are we not respecting other immigrants rights....

    Some of them were affraid of been deported, just as everyone else... but maybe didn't have any opportunity or knowledge, or support... who knows... that's not the important issue here...

    We as immigrants want to live in US and we "would like" US to allow us to live here... they pick, they select, based on reasons that may be right or not.... it's up to the United States of America to receive whom ever they want to.

    Live with that...

  6. #6
    Guest
    Be Real...

    Are your comments directed to me? If they are then you are way off base. I am an immigrant myself and don't even remotely think that immigrants take jobs away from USC's. As a matter of fact, if you have read my other posts, you will see that I feel that immigrants CREATE jobs for USC's!

    I just feel that if there are rules, then they should apply to everyone otherwise it is not fair to those of us who do follow them. If the rules don't work, then work on changing the rules not picking and choosing the ones that we want to follow.

    Of course, there always has to be room for compasion and discretion. But I bet you will find thousands of terrible stories like this so why should this person get an 'exception' while others have their lives ruined and torn apart for exactly the same thing...

    Also remember why this story is coming out now and not months ago! It is being released by Democrat's trying to embarrass the Republican Gov't weeks before an election. Isn't it nice how things work in politics?

  7. #7
    Guest
    Hi ARQU

    I agree with you in most of your comments and possitions, but i just don't want us to become more rigids in our convictions than some citizens that use to put all illegal immigrants in a black box and marked them with and "X".

    Political reason are some of the "wrong reasons" I metioned before... but at least they may help someone at the end...

    Of course I'm worry because this kind of things may delay the process of my case... but hey!!... it will be processed at it's own time... this may be the time for someone else... I just keep working, hoping and helping... just the same you're doing here...

    Keep on the good support your providing in this forum... and thanks for been here for us...

  8. #8
    Guest
    I agree with you that no one should ignore deportation order -- that is really a big thing. BTW, this is not the first time this story appear in the news, in fact it was quite some time ago. According to that article, he was picked up and still being detained because of the "Absconder List Apprehension Program", due to Sept 11. What is interesting was they declared in their application (AOS-USC marriage) that they had a deportation order. Their family thought that they did everything that they supposed to be doing when they file the AOS, and even renewing his EAD. They've been married for years and application was pending for years also. Should he be picked up when INS review his application? He is still being detained, if I can recall because of the investigation tying up with terrorism.

    I wish I can find the first article I read.

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