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Thread: 53 % Denied Green Cards

  1. #1
    Michael
    Guest
    Their wed of deceit unraveled

    53% denied green cards


    By LESLIE CASIMIR
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

    Even if the bride wore white, there's no guarantee of the green.
    More than half of all green card applications stemming from marriages to U.S. citizens in 2001 were denied by immigration officers, a top U.S. official told the Daily News.

    Of the 17,900 marriage-based petitions processed in fiscal year 2003, 9,500 were denied, or a record 53%, said Mary Ann Gantner, interim director of the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services' district in New York. The year before, 30% were denied.

    "We've done a significant amount of training in the last year with our officers so they are better able to detect fraudulent documents and phony marriages," said Gantner, who beefed up her interviewing staff in New York to 40 from 32.

    Of those denied green cards in 2003, 11% of the couples were caught lying in their interviews, tripping up on some of the most mundane details of married life, interview officers reported.

    For example, some people couldn't say how many bedrooms were in their apartments, how their spouses got to and from work, or even where the in-laws lived, Gantner said. The sham marriage participants now face deportation and hefty fines.

    Others who were rejected simply got cold feet, and never showed up for interviews with immigrations officials. There is generally a two-year lag between weddings and processing of marriage-based green card applications.

    Gantner said the bulk of those rejected were part of the stampede to the city clerk's office in 2001, when long lines of immigrants wrapped around the marriage license bureau at 1 Centre St.

    The rush was set off when an immigration law was temporarily reinstated by Congress allowing undocumented immigrants - who normally would have to go back home and wait several years - to apply for green cards based on family relationships and employer sponsorship.

    Marriage to a U.S. citizen is the simplest and fastest way for an unskilled worker - such as a janitor or nanny - to gain legal residency.

    And marriage remains the most popular way to get a green card, representing the bulk of applications received in the New York district, Gantner said.

    "People are scared, people are desperate," said Marcia Needleman, a Manhattan immigration attorney, who discourages her clients from taking part in phony marriages.

    Gantner said she does not feel sorry for those who commit fraud. "My sympathies lie more with the individual who is waiting in their home country - waiting in line - doing things legally," she said.

    Originally published on November 24, 2003

  2. #2
    Michael
    Guest
    Their wed of deceit unraveled

    53% denied green cards


    By LESLIE CASIMIR
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

    Even if the bride wore white, there's no guarantee of the green.
    More than half of all green card applications stemming from marriages to U.S. citizens in 2001 were denied by immigration officers, a top U.S. official told the Daily News.

    Of the 17,900 marriage-based petitions processed in fiscal year 2003, 9,500 were denied, or a record 53%, said Mary Ann Gantner, interim director of the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services' district in New York. The year before, 30% were denied.

    "We've done a significant amount of training in the last year with our officers so they are better able to detect fraudulent documents and phony marriages," said Gantner, who beefed up her interviewing staff in New York to 40 from 32.

    Of those denied green cards in 2003, 11% of the couples were caught lying in their interviews, tripping up on some of the most mundane details of married life, interview officers reported.

    For example, some people couldn't say how many bedrooms were in their apartments, how their spouses got to and from work, or even where the in-laws lived, Gantner said. The sham marriage participants now face deportation and hefty fines.

    Others who were rejected simply got cold feet, and never showed up for interviews with immigrations officials. There is generally a two-year lag between weddings and processing of marriage-based green card applications.

    Gantner said the bulk of those rejected were part of the stampede to the city clerk's office in 2001, when long lines of immigrants wrapped around the marriage license bureau at 1 Centre St.

    The rush was set off when an immigration law was temporarily reinstated by Congress allowing undocumented immigrants - who normally would have to go back home and wait several years - to apply for green cards based on family relationships and employer sponsorship.

    Marriage to a U.S. citizen is the simplest and fastest way for an unskilled worker - such as a janitor or nanny - to gain legal residency.

    And marriage remains the most popular way to get a green card, representing the bulk of applications received in the New York district, Gantner said.

    "People are scared, people are desperate," said Marcia Needleman, a Manhattan immigration attorney, who discourages her clients from taking part in phony marriages.

    Gantner said she does not feel sorry for those who commit fraud. "My sympathies lie more with the individual who is waiting in their home country - waiting in line - doing things legally," she said.

    Originally published on November 24, 2003

  3. #3
    Mr. acelaw or guest or who?!; and you will see that anybody in a genuie marriage agrees (alien or not) because for the deeds of a few everybody is being punished with long waits, suspicions, and fraud accusations!

  4. #4
    Fifty percent (and those are just the ones found out) is hardly a "few"

  5. #5
    So, Michael, we should then see a huge number of fraud investigations and deportations.
    Would you be so kind to provide direct link to this article or the primary source of data, which, I doubt, even exists ?

  6. #6
    Sam11:

    The source is the NEW YORK POST NEWSPAPER DATED TODAY, and they got the information through an US OFFICIAL

  7. #7
    Can you supply me with the link.
    There is nothing in their on-line edition.
    This data is very interesting; everybody knows that there is a lot of fraud involved, but it is very difficult to catch.
    53%- sounds unreal.

  8. #8
    I read it on the paper version of the newspaper.

    Many people got married to avoid deportation for SPECIAL REGISTRATION and also to take advantage of 245i

  9. #9
    That is a small segment of middle easterns who were very carefully scrutinized after 9/11.
    Overall statistics are very different, I think around 95+ approval rates.

  10. #10
    "Of the 17,900 marriage-based petitions processed in fiscal year 2003, 9,500 were denied, or a record 53%, said Mary Ann Gantner, interim director of the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services' district in New York. The year before, 30% were denied."

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