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Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: 2002 Poverty Guidelines (very long, but informative)

  1. #1
    Guest
    What are the income requirements for an Affidavit of Support?
    You also must meet certain income requirements (whether you are a sponsor, a joint sponsor, or a substitute sponsor). You must show that your household income is equal to or higher than 125 percent of the U.S. poverty level for your household size (See table below.) Your household size includes you, your dependents, any relatives living with you, and the immigrants you are sponsoring. For example, if you have a spouse and two children and you want to sponsor your brother and his wife, you must prove that your household income is equal to or higher than 125 percent of the U.S. poverty level for a family of six, or $30,325, from the table below. You must also include in your household size any immigrants you have previously sponsored under this part of the law. In the above example, if you had previously sponsored your parents and your sister, your household size would be nine persons and you would need a household income of $41,875 ($38,025 + $3,850).

    If you, the sponsor, are on active duty in the Armed Forces of the United States, and the immigrant you are sponsoring is your spouse or child, your income only needs to equal 100 percent of the U.S. poverty level for your family size.



    2002 POVERTY GUIDELINES*
    Minimum Income Requirement for Use in Completing Form I-864

    For the 48 Contiguous States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam:
    Sponsor's Household Size 100% Poverty Line 125% Poverty Line
    2 11,940 14,925
    3 15,020 18,775
    4 18,100 22,625
    5 21,180 26,475
    6 24,260 30,325
    7 27,340 34,175
    8 30,420 38,025
    Add $3,080 for each additional person Add $3,850 for each additional person



    For Alaska:
    Sponsor's Household Size 100% Poverty Line 125% Poverty Line
    2 14,930 18,662
    3 18,780 23,474
    4 22,630 28,286
    5 26,480 33,098
    6 30,330 37,910
    7 34,180 42,722
    8 38,030 47,534
    Add $3,850 for each additional person Add $4,812 for each additional person



    For Hawaii:
    Sponsor's Household Size 100% Poverty Line 125% Poverty Line
    2 13,740 17,175
    3 17,280 21,600
    4 20,820 26,025
    5 24,360 30,450
    6 27,900 34,875
    7 31,440 39,300
    8 34,980 43,725
    Add $3,540 for each additional person Add $4,425 for each additional person


    *These poverty guidelines remain in effect for use with the Form I-864 Affidavit of Support from April 1, 2002, until new poverty guidelines go into effect in the Spring of 2003.

    If you cannot meet the minimum income requirements using your earned income, you have various options:

    You may add the cash value of your assets such as money in savings accounts, stocks, bonds, and property. To determine the amount of assets required to qualify, subtract your household income from the minimum income requirement (125 percent of the poverty level for your family size). You must prove the cash value of your assets is worth five times this difference (the amount left over).

    Example for a household size of 4:
    125 percent of 2002 poverty guideline
    $22,625

    sponsor's income
    $18,000

    Difference
    $4,625

    Multiply by 5
    x 5

    Minimum Required Cash Value of Assets
    $23,125


    You may count the income and assets of members of your household who are related to you by birth, marriage, or adoption. To use their income you must have listed them as dependents on your most recent federal tax return or they must have lived with you for the last 6 months. They must also complete a Form I-864A, Contract between Sponsor and Household Member. If the relative you are sponsoring meets these criteria you may include the value of their income and assets, but the immigrant does not need to complete Form I-864A unless he or she has accompanying family members.


    You may count the assets of the relatives you are sponsoring.

    What are My Responsibilities as a Sponsor?
    When you sign the Affidavit of Support, you accept legal responsibility for financially supporting the sponsored immigrant(s) until they become U.S. citizens or can be credited with 40 quarters of work. Any joint sponsors or household members whose income is used to meet the minimum income requirements are also legally responsible for financially supporting the sponsored immigrant. If the immigrant receives any "means-tested public benefits," you are responsible for repaying the cost of those benefits to the agency that provided them. If you do not repay the debt, the agency can sue you in court to get the money owed. When in doubt, ask the benefit provider whether the benefit is a "means-tested public benefit."

    Currently, Federal means-tested public benefits include Food Stamps, Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and the State Child Health Insurance Program (CHIP). States and local jurisdictions may also designate certain of their programs as means-tested public benefits.

    The following types of programs are not counted as means-tested public benefits: emergency Medicaid; short-term, non-cash emergency relief; services provided under the National School Lunch and Child Nutrition Acts; immunizations and testing and treatment for communicable diseases; student assistance under the Higher Education Act and the Public Health Service Act; certain forms of foster-care or adoption assistance under the Social Security Act; Head Start programs; means-tested programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act; and Job Training Partnership Act programs.


    What if my address changes?
    If you change your address after you become a sponsor, you are required by law to notify the INS within 30 days by filing INS Form I-865, Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address. If you fail to notify INS of your change of address, you may be fined.

  2. #2
    Guest
    What are the income requirements for an Affidavit of Support?
    You also must meet certain income requirements (whether you are a sponsor, a joint sponsor, or a substitute sponsor). You must show that your household income is equal to or higher than 125 percent of the U.S. poverty level for your household size (See table below.) Your household size includes you, your dependents, any relatives living with you, and the immigrants you are sponsoring. For example, if you have a spouse and two children and you want to sponsor your brother and his wife, you must prove that your household income is equal to or higher than 125 percent of the U.S. poverty level for a family of six, or $30,325, from the table below. You must also include in your household size any immigrants you have previously sponsored under this part of the law. In the above example, if you had previously sponsored your parents and your sister, your household size would be nine persons and you would need a household income of $41,875 ($38,025 + $3,850).

    If you, the sponsor, are on active duty in the Armed Forces of the United States, and the immigrant you are sponsoring is your spouse or child, your income only needs to equal 100 percent of the U.S. poverty level for your family size.



    2002 POVERTY GUIDELINES*
    Minimum Income Requirement for Use in Completing Form I-864

    For the 48 Contiguous States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam:
    Sponsor's Household Size 100% Poverty Line 125% Poverty Line
    2 11,940 14,925
    3 15,020 18,775
    4 18,100 22,625
    5 21,180 26,475
    6 24,260 30,325
    7 27,340 34,175
    8 30,420 38,025
    Add $3,080 for each additional person Add $3,850 for each additional person



    For Alaska:
    Sponsor's Household Size 100% Poverty Line 125% Poverty Line
    2 14,930 18,662
    3 18,780 23,474
    4 22,630 28,286
    5 26,480 33,098
    6 30,330 37,910
    7 34,180 42,722
    8 38,030 47,534
    Add $3,850 for each additional person Add $4,812 for each additional person



    For Hawaii:
    Sponsor's Household Size 100% Poverty Line 125% Poverty Line
    2 13,740 17,175
    3 17,280 21,600
    4 20,820 26,025
    5 24,360 30,450
    6 27,900 34,875
    7 31,440 39,300
    8 34,980 43,725
    Add $3,540 for each additional person Add $4,425 for each additional person


    *These poverty guidelines remain in effect for use with the Form I-864 Affidavit of Support from April 1, 2002, until new poverty guidelines go into effect in the Spring of 2003.

    If you cannot meet the minimum income requirements using your earned income, you have various options:

    You may add the cash value of your assets such as money in savings accounts, stocks, bonds, and property. To determine the amount of assets required to qualify, subtract your household income from the minimum income requirement (125 percent of the poverty level for your family size). You must prove the cash value of your assets is worth five times this difference (the amount left over).

    Example for a household size of 4:
    125 percent of 2002 poverty guideline
    $22,625

    sponsor's income
    $18,000

    Difference
    $4,625

    Multiply by 5
    x 5

    Minimum Required Cash Value of Assets
    $23,125


    You may count the income and assets of members of your household who are related to you by birth, marriage, or adoption. To use their income you must have listed them as dependents on your most recent federal tax return or they must have lived with you for the last 6 months. They must also complete a Form I-864A, Contract between Sponsor and Household Member. If the relative you are sponsoring meets these criteria you may include the value of their income and assets, but the immigrant does not need to complete Form I-864A unless he or she has accompanying family members.


    You may count the assets of the relatives you are sponsoring.

    What are My Responsibilities as a Sponsor?
    When you sign the Affidavit of Support, you accept legal responsibility for financially supporting the sponsored immigrant(s) until they become U.S. citizens or can be credited with 40 quarters of work. Any joint sponsors or household members whose income is used to meet the minimum income requirements are also legally responsible for financially supporting the sponsored immigrant. If the immigrant receives any "means-tested public benefits," you are responsible for repaying the cost of those benefits to the agency that provided them. If you do not repay the debt, the agency can sue you in court to get the money owed. When in doubt, ask the benefit provider whether the benefit is a "means-tested public benefit."

    Currently, Federal means-tested public benefits include Food Stamps, Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and the State Child Health Insurance Program (CHIP). States and local jurisdictions may also designate certain of their programs as means-tested public benefits.

    The following types of programs are not counted as means-tested public benefits: emergency Medicaid; short-term, non-cash emergency relief; services provided under the National School Lunch and Child Nutrition Acts; immunizations and testing and treatment for communicable diseases; student assistance under the Higher Education Act and the Public Health Service Act; certain forms of foster-care or adoption assistance under the Social Security Act; Head Start programs; means-tested programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act; and Job Training Partnership Act programs.


    What if my address changes?
    If you change your address after you become a sponsor, you are required by law to notify the INS within 30 days by filing INS Form I-865, Sponsor's Notice of Change of Address. If you fail to notify INS of your change of address, you may be fined.

  3. #3
    Guest
    Thanks for the posting elvis. I was looking for this info today and saw your post.

  4. #4
    Guest
    This info. is included in the package sent to propective immigrant by the NVC. tHE FORM IS 1-864p

  5. #5
    Guest
    Hi Elvis
    My Name is martina,and I have been reading your article,Iam desperate to find answers.I have been living here in the U.S.A 11 years now I have a permanent Resident Alien card that does not exp.I have a good paying job and iam divorced for about 4 years now. I met someone from my own country (Germany) and we fell in love,he had to go back he lives in switzerland right now. We are trying to find a way to be togethera.s.a.p marriage would be one option.But i found out that I would have to become a u.S citizen it would go faster,but even that process would take forever,right and then i would have to file a petition Fiance Visa for him right.Would we have a chance if i would just sponser him I could easely do it with my Income and then get married over here and do all the legal stuff from here?
    I know people say be patient but we miss each other alot,would this be a way to get him over here so we can be together or can't I do this because iam not a U.S Citizen and if we just go ahead and get married anyway while he is here would he have to have a SS# or would be a passport all we need and his birth certificate!
    Please don't make fun of me I have read some of the repplies that some people send and it is sad that they have to be that way!
    Thank you so much.......

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