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Thread: TJ Maxx pays $6.50 an hour and almost no local residents work there, Attardo said.

  1. #1
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Posted on Tue, Aug. 19, 2003



    TJ Maxx, work force under fire
    PITTSTON TOWNSHIP: Officials, citizens voice concerns about possible illegal immigrants.
    By MARK SCARAMASTRO and MICHAEL McNARNEY
    tlnews@leader.net

    More than 40 township residents, many applauding speakers critical of what they believe is a largely Hispanic work force at the new TJ Maxx warehouse, jammed Monday night's meeting of the township supervisors.
    Police Chief Stephen Rinaldi - out of uniform but sitting at the supervisors table - told residents and township officials not to talk about the topic.

    "Don't bring the immigrants up," Rinaldi told Tom Szumski of Boston Street, who had signed up at the start of the meeting to talk about TJ Maxx.

    "Why not?" a lady in the back row shot back.

    "I can't divulge the information," Rinaldi said. "It's being taken care of." Rinaldi offered to tell the lady in secret, after the meeting, what was happening.

    But that didn't stop Szumski, Supervisor Anthony Attardo and others from speaking out.

    Szumski was concerned that illegal aliens were working at the warehouse, in the Grimes Industrial Park, and asked supervisors to call the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to make sure workers were in the country legally.

    Szumski said he owned a contracting business in California for years but was put out of business by competition hiring illegal aliens as cheap labor. He doesn't want to see the area "overrun" by illegal immigrants, he said.

    "They're not going to be paying any taxes, and they're going to be getting everything for free," Szumski said. "Where do you think they are coming from, Minnesota?"

    Attardo proposed a resolution endorsing strict enforcement of immigration laws in the township, but it was not acted upon. He also wants Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Philadelphia, and U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Pittsburgh, to help open an INS office in the Wilkes-Barre area.

    The 1-million-square-foot TJ Maxx warehouse employs about 500 and is in a Keystone Opportunity Zone that exempts the company from most taxes. All the township sees from the operation, Attardo said, is $5 per year, per employee, or about $2,500.

    "We made a big mistake when we zoned the property KOZ," Attardo said.

    Attardo said that when a Scranton lawyer representing TJ Maxx approached the supervisors two years ago, the township was promised that TJ Maxx would hire local people and pay them $8 to $10 an hour for general labor and $14 to $16 an hour for supervisors. There was also to be a 50-cent raise after six months and full medical benefits after 90 days.

    TJ Maxx pays $6.50 an hour and almost no local residents work there, Attardo said.

    "We were lied to," Attardo said.

    TIMES LEADER STAFF PHOTO/PETE G. WILCOX

    Pittston Township is at risk of being 'overrun' by illegal immigrants, township resident Tom Szumski of Boston Street told supervisors Monday night at the township building. Supervisors have criticized the hiring of and low wages paid to what's perceived as a predominantly Hispanic work force at the TJ Maxx warehouse at the Grimes Industrial Park.







    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2003 Times Leader and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.
    http://www.timesleader.com

  2. #2
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Posted on Tue, Aug. 19, 2003



    TJ Maxx, work force under fire
    PITTSTON TOWNSHIP: Officials, citizens voice concerns about possible illegal immigrants.
    By MARK SCARAMASTRO and MICHAEL McNARNEY
    tlnews@leader.net

    More than 40 township residents, many applauding speakers critical of what they believe is a largely Hispanic work force at the new TJ Maxx warehouse, jammed Monday night's meeting of the township supervisors.
    Police Chief Stephen Rinaldi - out of uniform but sitting at the supervisors table - told residents and township officials not to talk about the topic.

    "Don't bring the immigrants up," Rinaldi told Tom Szumski of Boston Street, who had signed up at the start of the meeting to talk about TJ Maxx.

    "Why not?" a lady in the back row shot back.

    "I can't divulge the information," Rinaldi said. "It's being taken care of." Rinaldi offered to tell the lady in secret, after the meeting, what was happening.

    But that didn't stop Szumski, Supervisor Anthony Attardo and others from speaking out.

    Szumski was concerned that illegal aliens were working at the warehouse, in the Grimes Industrial Park, and asked supervisors to call the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to make sure workers were in the country legally.

    Szumski said he owned a contracting business in California for years but was put out of business by competition hiring illegal aliens as cheap labor. He doesn't want to see the area "overrun" by illegal immigrants, he said.

    "They're not going to be paying any taxes, and they're going to be getting everything for free," Szumski said. "Where do you think they are coming from, Minnesota?"

    Attardo proposed a resolution endorsing strict enforcement of immigration laws in the township, but it was not acted upon. He also wants Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Philadelphia, and U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum, R-Pittsburgh, to help open an INS office in the Wilkes-Barre area.

    The 1-million-square-foot TJ Maxx warehouse employs about 500 and is in a Keystone Opportunity Zone that exempts the company from most taxes. All the township sees from the operation, Attardo said, is $5 per year, per employee, or about $2,500.

    "We made a big mistake when we zoned the property KOZ," Attardo said.

    Attardo said that when a Scranton lawyer representing TJ Maxx approached the supervisors two years ago, the township was promised that TJ Maxx would hire local people and pay them $8 to $10 an hour for general labor and $14 to $16 an hour for supervisors. There was also to be a 50-cent raise after six months and full medical benefits after 90 days.

    TJ Maxx pays $6.50 an hour and almost no local residents work there, Attardo said.

    "We were lied to," Attardo said.

    TIMES LEADER STAFF PHOTO/PETE G. WILCOX

    Pittston Township is at risk of being 'overrun' by illegal immigrants, township resident Tom Szumski of Boston Street told supervisors Monday night at the township building. Supervisors have criticized the hiring of and low wages paid to what's perceived as a predominantly Hispanic work force at the TJ Maxx warehouse at the Grimes Industrial Park.







    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2003 Times Leader and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.
    http://www.timesleader.com

  3. #3
    Guest
    I am so tired of reading ACELAW's posts. If you can't offer an opinion on something - don't post. I don't mind the cutting and pasting if you are using it to back up a statement, but you are just randomly cutting & Pasting. Do you not have an opinion on anything yourself?????

  4. #4
    Guest
    acelaw and kenny and some other names are abusing this forum by posting anti-immigrant and hate messages.
    rajoo

  5. #5
    I think things like this are unnecessary also. We can all find news articles, bulletin boards, etc. to read the same information. While I'm complaining I'll also say I truly detest someone using up so much space for the Topic.

  6. #6
    Guest
    I used to try to argue with Acelaw, but I gave it up. He cannot follow a logical discussion. He can only cut and paste. I don't know why someone so anti-immigrant would waste so much time posting on an immigration advise board in the first place.

  7. #7
    COMING TO AMERICA
    Illegals crushing L.A. health system?
    Report says 'epidemic' crisis threatens capacity to serve citizens

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Posted: August 21, 2003
    1:00 a.m. Eastern


    By Jon Dougherty
    2003 WorldNetDaily.com

    The cost to provide medical care to illegal immigrants is severely affecting the ability of Los Angeles County and other parts of California to provide health services to all its residents as numerous emergency rooms close and hospitals plunge deeper into debt.

    According to a new report by Project USA, an immigration reform group that supports immigration limits and restrictions, illegals who routinely use emergency rooms as free clinics are costing L.A. County and state taxpayers $340 million annually a figure that rises each year, even as lawmakers in Sacramento struggle to dig the state out of its $38 billion budget deficit.


    California hospitals must treat illegal aliens

    California officials, says Project USA, note the problem is "epidemic" in the state, adding "since employers usually pay illegal aliens 'off the books,' neither the employer nor the workers pay payroll taxes."

    Citing federal statutes, experts and reformists say there are laws on the books ostensibly forbidding or restricting the kind of free, non-emergency health care available to aliens. "Yet," says Project USA's report, "a link from the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services' website ... instructs 'immigrants' to access many of the public services forbidden to them by federal law."

    On the department's website, 20 welfare- and social services-related programs are listed as being available to "immigrants." They include food stamps, housing assistance, childcare, job and educational assistance, as well as state-funded health care benefits under a program called Medi-Cal.

    "No wonder 40 percent of Medi-Cal patients are now non-English speaking foreigners demanding costly translator services at public expense," said the report. "And no wonder an entire industry has sprung up in Asia advising sick Asians how to access U.S. health care."

    The report says L.A. County, using "'Orwellian' doublespeak," tries to convince immigrants "they can access cash benefits to which they are not lawfully entitled because ... the cash benefits aren't really cash benefits."

    "Some of the above programs may provide cash benefits," says information on the L.A. Department of Public Services website. "The purpose of such benefits is not for income maintenance but rather to avoid the need for on-going cash assistance for income maintenance; therefore, they are not subject to public charge consideration."

    Across the nation

    As WorldNetDaily reported, mass immigration is posing a host of economic hardships on the nation. Many of the states hardest hit by illegal immigration are already struggling with budget problems.

    Urban sprawl, congestion, school overcrowding and soaring prices for homes in the 1990s are all byproducts of "record levels of mass immigration," said a report issued earlier this month by the Federation for American Immigration Reform, or FAIR.

    An earlier report blamed nearly all of California's population growth during the 1990s on "a massive inflow of immigrants and births to immigrants, not from internal growth."

    But supporters of providing free health care to immigrants say U.S. health care professionals have an obligation to aliens as well as citizens.

    "Doctors within the public health care system have been encouraged to report sick, illegal immigrants to the authorities to help them deport such people," says a report by the Hastings Center, a health-care think tank in Washington. "The obvious question is whether health care professionals have moral obligations to their patients that preclude participation in such practices."

    "Unsurprisingly," the analysis continues, "immigrants' organizations have suggested that doctors should have the health of their patients in mind, and support their attempts to immigrate into a country that has a functioning health care system."

    "It is disturbing that sick immigrants ... cannot even rely on their general practitioners to keep confidentiality," it said.

    Also, supporters say children of illegal immigrants could suffer or die if they don't receive medical attention, even care to which they are not necessarily entitled under the law.

    Nevertheless, critics of continued high levels of immigration say the burden it is placing on health care is becoming unsustainable.

    "Illegal immigration is no free lunch, and it's becoming apparent as emergency rooms in border states close because of costs incurred by illegal aliens and leave hardworking Americans with no healthcare options," David Ray, a spokesman for FAIR, told WorldNetDaily. "If illegal immigration is not stopped at the border, its negative consequences, including bankrupt emergency rooms and overcrowded schools, quickly become everyone's financial burden."

    Mark Krikorian, head of the Center for Immigration Studies, said there is no easy way out of the current dilemmas posed by illegal immigration. But doing nothing is worse, he told WorldNetDaily.

    "The solution is to start enforcing the law not just at the border, which is politically easy, but also inside the country," he said.

    Other experts agree, saying once illegals are in the country it is next to impossible to stop them from using public services, even those from which they are banned. The answer, say immigration reformers, is to stop illegals at the border through direct enforcement and other measures designed to discourage so many migrants from coming.

    For starters, said Krikorian, the federal government should begin issuing "steep fines" to employers who hire illegal aliens. And he said government should deny "illegal aliens access not only to jobs but also to bank accounts, mortgages, colleges, driver's licenses, professional licenses of all kinds."

    Prosecution of illegal border jumpers and criminalizing the overstaying of visas, as well as seizing "the assets of captured illegal aliens, as we do with drug offenders," also would dramatically reduce illegal immigration, he said.

    Ray contended current immigration laws and policies were conflicting with efforts to reduce state expenditures, especially on the West Coast.

    "It's ironic that on the one hand, Californians are screaming about the high cost of open borders, yet on the other hand they're pushing for laws that allow illegal aliens access to their state drivers license," he said.

    "For those who claim that illegal aliens provide the cheap labor to keep their dinner tables set, they're forgetting the 'giant ****ing sound' made by the huge demand illegal aliens place on all of our social services," Ray said. "California, in the midst of its current budget crisis, is starting to see the real cost of virtually open borders. Interior states should take heed."

    Related stories:

    'Mass' immigration causing urban 'bloat'

    Immigration fueling California growth

    Border becoming smuggler's paradise

    Expert: Crack down on illegals inside U.S.

    Hispanics sue over forced deportations

  8. #8
    acelaw and kenny and some other names are abusing this forum by posting anti-immigrant and hate messages.
    rajoo




    Still Learning

    Member
    posted August 20, 2003 04:11 PM
    I think things like this are unnecessary also. We can all find news articles, bulletin boards, etc. to read the same information. While I'm complaining I'll also say I truly detest someone using up so much space for the Topic.




    Chipmunk

    Member
    posted August 20, 2003 04:27 PM
    I used to try to argue with Acelaw, but I gave it up. He cannot follow a logical discussion. He can only cut and paste. I don't know why someone so anti-immigrant would waste so much time posting on an immigration advise board in the first place.

    Who is abusing WHO HERE???? Chipmonk its ok for you to not agree with the ***s but let some one diagree with illegal immigration and its wrong???? Raciest ETC....Check our laws and get back to me LOLOLOL.SOON OK.

    Immigration in California
    State Population 33,871,648
    Population Increase 1990-2000 4,111,627
    Foreign-Born Population 8,864,255
    Percent Foreign-Born 26.2%
    Illegal Resident Population 2,300,0001
    2025 Population Projection 49,285,000
    All numbers are from the U.S. Census Bureau unless otherwise noted.
    Additional Census Bureau, INS, and other immigration-related data are available for California and its local jurisdictions.
    Immigration-driven population growth is taking its toll on California, the largest growing state in the U.S. In the last ten years, 4.1 million new residents settled in California. More than 60 percent of these new residents were immigrants. California has not just the greatest number of immigrants of any state; it also has more than twice as many as the next leading state. California is home to 28 percent of the nation's immigrants (versus ten percent of the U.S.-born population).

    This large-scale population growth is bringing traffic, pollution, overcrowded schools, and lack of affordable housing to the state, decreasing quality of life, and straining natural resources. The net cost of immigration to the state was $28 billion in 1996; 71 percent of the cost was due to legal immigration.2

    Profile in Numbers
    Population Increase
    At 33.9 million people, California had the largest population gain of any state in the country during the past decade. Between 1990 and 2000, California's population increased by 14 percent, adding 4.1 million people. The state's population increase accounted for 13 percent of the country's population increase between 1990 and 2000.

    Between 2000 and 2001, California had five of the top ten counties with the largest population increase in the country. During the same period, of California's 475 cities, 429 increased in population.3

    In 2000, California had 217 people per square mile (173 percent higher than the national average of 79.6), up from 191 people per square mile in 1990.4


    California has the largest foreign-born population in the country. Between 1990 and 2000, California's foreign-born population increased by 2.4 million people, bringing its total foreign-born population to 8.9 million.5 This is a 37 percent increase over the 1990 total foreign-born population of 6.5 million people.6

    Immigrants now make up 26 percent of the state's population, which is well above the national rate of 11 percent, and for the first time, immigrants now make up a larger portion of California's population than newcomers from other states.7

    California's foreign-born make up 28 percent of the nation's total foreign-born.

    About 15.9 million people in California are immigrants or the children or immigrants -- nearly half of all state residents.8

    Trends for the Future
    The Census Bureau's middle series projection estimates that California's population will increase by 52 percent between 2000 and 2025, to 49 million.

    In a Public Policy Institute poll released May 21, 82 percent said the state's projected population increase would make California a less desirable place to live.9

    Impact on Environment and Quality of Life
    Water: : California officials say population growth is outrunning the water supply.10 Each newcomer to the state uses about 140 gallons of water every day.11 Water officials predict that by 2020 the state will be short by between 2.4 million and 6 million acre-feet of water (an acre-foot is about enough water to supply two typical families for a year).12 Under the worst-case scenario, cities could be forced to reduce their reliance on local ground water from 75 percent to 57 percent, making up the difference with higher-priced imported water, which will increase household water bills.13

    "Every official California water plan projects a huge gap between need and supply," says former Illinois Senator Paul Simon, author of a book on water shortages. "Symbolic of California's problems is the story of Owens Lake. Early in this century, Los Angeles-area water authorities understood that they'd face problems as the population grew, so they purchased the third-largest body of water in the state, Owens Lake. Today it is called Owens Dry Lake, because L.A. has ****ed it dry."14


    Traffic: California already has five of the nation's 20 most congested metro areas, and traffic jams statewide cost $21 billion a year in lost time and wasted fuel, according to the Texas Transportation Institute. The state's official forecast says the number of miles driven on Los Angeles and Orange County roads will increase 40 percent by 2020. In San Bernardino County, driving will grow 86 percent by 2020, but officials say they can afford just 10 percent more highway capacity. In Sacramento, even with $15 billion in planned road improvements, congestion will increase by 400 percent in the next 20 years.15 In the San Fernando Valley area, the average morning rush-hour speed of 31 mph is expected to fall to 16 mph by 2025.16

    Los Angeles has been the most traffic-choked urban area in the country for 15 years in a row.17 The total vehicle miles traveled in the region almost doubled in the last 20 years.18

    Disappearing open space: Population growth increases housing needs and generally causes greater development of open space and sprawl. Although California was once home to five million acres of wetlands, today only 454,000 acres survive -- a loss of over 90 percent.19 The total number of housing units in California increased by over one million units during the 1990s.20,21 An area equivalent to one and a half times the size of Rhode Island was paved over in California during that period.22,23 The California Department of Housing and Community Development found that Los Angeles and Orange Counties do not have a sufficient amount of developable land in order to accommodate population growth in the next 20 years.24 To meet the needs of its expanding population, California will need 4.3 million more housing units by 2020, says the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy, guaranteeing that open space will continue to vanish.25

    Farmland Loss: The Central Valley, which provides half of all fruits and vegetables to America, is the most threatened farm region in the country due to its massive population increase, according to American Farmland Trust. In the past 20 years, over two million people have moved to the region, shrinking cropland by 500,000 acres.26 The valley's current population of 5.5 million is expected to grow to 12.5 million by 2040, reducing farmland by another one million to 2.5 million acres.27

    Crowded Housing: A rise in crowded housing often correlates with an increase in the number of foreign-born.28,29 California's number of severely crowded households increased by 42 percent, to 1,048,000, in 2000. This was nine percent of all households.30,31


    California has the most crowded cities in the country, as measured by the percentage of packed households. Of the 50 cities with the highest percentage of crowded homes, 39 are in California.32 Los Angeles County has the highest rate of severe crowding in the U.S., at 15 percent.33 In the Los Angeles-Riverside-Orange County area, 12 percent of all households are considered severely crowded.34 Experts say the trend in California is being driven by immigrants who come for jobs but can't afford the rents. Families move in together and often take boarders to help pay rents or mortgages. So many people living in single-family homes strains services such as trash collection, schools, and public safety.

    Lack of Affordable Housing: Every year, California builds about 140,000 new places for people to live. Every year, that's 80,000 short, say state housing officials. Only one in three Californians can afford a median-priced home of more than $250,000. Millions of working people spend more than half their paychecks for rent. The state's Department of Housing and Community Development warns of extreme shortages in years ahead.35

    Nine of the ten least affordable housing markets in the nation are in California.36 The National Low Income Housing Coalition says that California is the least affordable state for renters seeking two-bedroom apartments.37 Both renters and homeowners in California devote a larger share of their incomes to housing than their counterparts in almost all states. Nearly half of California's renters spend 30 percent or more of their incomes on rent. More than a fifth of all homeowners in the state spend more than 40 percent of their income on their mortgage and other housing costs.38 To afford the average two-bedroom apartment, a worker has to earn three times the minimum wage or work 126 hours a week at minimum wage in order to pay for it.39 It's more than twice as difficult to afford a home in the state compared with the rest of the country, according to the California Association of Realtors.40

    Poverty:: As California has become a magnet for unskilled immigrants who are low-wage employment in restaurants, fields, and factories, poverty remains pervasive. A RAND report finds: "A declining demand for low-skill workers combined with a continuing influx of low-skill immigrants has increased competition for low-skill jobs within the state and has hurt the earnings of some low-skill workers. It has also contributed to a growing disparity between the wages of foreign- and native-born workers."41

    Indeed, the plentiful supply of low-wage immigrant labor has lowered average incomes overall, says a labor specialist with the Public Policy Institute of California.42 Southern California's poverty is extending to suburbs long seen as refuges from urban problems. Riverside County saw a 63 percent rise in poverty and San Bernardino County a 51 percent increase.43


    In Los Angeles, where more than 40 percent of residents were born in another country, 22 percent live at the poverty level, up from 19 percent a decade earlier. Nearly one-third of the city's residents say they can't speak English "very well." One in ten adults in the region has six years of education or less,44 and 19 percent of those over age 24 have less than a ninth-grade education.45

    Nearly three-fifths of the poor children in California are immigrants. The poverty rate for immigrant children (29 percent) is higher than the rate for non-immigrant children (17 percent).46

    Health Care:: In 1994's Proposition 187, California voters banned the use of tax money to provide non-emergency care to illegal aliens, but a U.S. District Judge overturned the ballot proposition in 1999. California now provides both legal and illegal aliens with Emergency Medicaid, pre-natal care, and nursing home care.47 California's Medicaid expenditures for total noncitizens were $3.3 billion in 1994.48 Eighty-two percent of emergency rooms in the state reported losing money in 2000.49 In Santa Cruz, hospitals are so crowded that they regularly close their doors to new emergency patients. When they're open, less urgent patients often have to wait up to ten hours on weekends.50

    Impact of Immigration on Education
    California schools are the most crowded in the nation, and classes often exceed 35 students per teacher (18 is considered ideal).51 Lack of space forces some students to attend class on school stages or in the gym.52 Yet the state is still adding 100,000 new students each year.53

    The state Department of Education estimates that 16 new classrooms will need to be built every day, seven days a week, for the next five years.54 The number of teachers will need to be doubled within ten years, meaning that 300,000 new educators will need to be hired.55

    In Los Angeles, where schools are so crowded that some have lengthened the time between classes to give students time to make their way through packed halls,56 crowding in the next decade is projected to become so severe that some schools will have to hold double sessions (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) and Saturday classes. Even if the district builds 86 new schools, all 49 existing high schools will still have to adopt year-round schedules to keep pace with enrollment increases.57

    California's Class Size Reduction program calls for adding thousands of new K-3 teachers, but finding classroom space has proved impossible in some areas. Many schools have had to give up libraries, art and music classrooms, and science and computer labs to create additional space. Playgrounds are being transformed into parking lots for portable classroom trailers.58


    Half of all children in California have at least one immigrant parent. Nearly one in ten are foreign-born themselves.59

    Illegal Immigration in California
    The Migration Policy Institute estimates that about 2.3 million illegal residents live in California.60 This is an increase of 300,000, or 15 percent, in the number of illegal residents since 1996 and an increase of 859,000, or 60 percent, since 1992. About 26 percent of the country's illegal alien residents live in California, more than in any other state.61

    Illegal immigration cost California taxpayers $8 billion in 1996.62 California's border counties incurred $79 million in emergency care for illegal aliens, the highest cost in the country.63 San Diego County paid $50.3 million during 1999 for criminal justice services and medical care related to illegal aliens. Imperial County spent $5.4 million on illegal aliens in 1999, according to a study on behalf of the United States-Mexico Border Counties Coalition. It costs each person living legally in San Diego and Imperial counties about $18.56 per year to pay for the costs incurred by illegal immigration.64

    Under the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), the federal government has reimbursed California only $240 million of the more than $600 million the state spends annually to lock up illegal immigrant felons. San Bernardino County alone spends more than $2.6 million to house illegal immigrants in its jails.65

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